What Bono doesn't say about Africa - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind > Free Your Mind Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-09-2007, 02:23 PM   #21
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
hiphop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the jungle
Posts: 7,410
Local Time: 07:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by last unicorn
(Red) is a business model, not a charity, thus it needs advertising and promotion like any other business.
of course, but it needs 100 mil?

that´s a lot for a campaign.

i know companies who do spend that amount of money for their marketing campaigns, but 100 mil of mktg for red raises a lot of questions if the results aren´t adequate.

why not 10 mil and do something better with the rest?

reminds me of 4/4 colour 40 page reports of environmental projects.

i would like to see exact figures, if no one can provide them, the ad campaign is highly questionable. who´s feeding who here?
__________________

hiphop is offline  
Old 07-09-2007, 02:26 PM   #22
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
hiphop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the jungle
Posts: 7,410
Local Time: 07:24 AM
Re: What Bono doesn't say about Africa

Quote:
Originally posted by MaxFisher
But the fact remains that the West shows a lot more interest in begging bowls than in, say, letting African cotton growers compete fairly in Western markets (see the recent collapse of world trade talks).
very true.
__________________

hiphop is offline  
Old 07-09-2007, 02:28 PM   #23
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
Vincent Vega's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Berlin
Posts: 6,739
Local Time: 07:24 AM
It's probably somewhere between $60-100 million. This is not extra money. The companies that are making Red, such as Motorola, Gap, Sprinter, Apple and so on, have agreed to take some of the money already planned for advertising, and put it into the marketing campaign for Red.
Vincent Vega is offline  
Old 07-09-2007, 08:24 PM   #24
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
hiphop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the jungle
Posts: 7,410
Local Time: 07:24 AM
Sounds a little better. Thanks for update.
hiphop is offline  
Old 07-11-2007, 09:16 PM   #25
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Jamila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,454
Local Time: 11:24 PM
Here is the reply by Bobby Shriver, CEO of (RED), to that nasty totally untrue article about Bono and his organizations for Africa that appeared in the 6 July 2007 edition of the LA Times:



Bright spots in Africa overlooked
July 10, 2007



Re "What Bono doesn't say about Africa," Opinion, July 6


What Vanity Fair did William Easterly read? He ignores the positive stories contained in the Africa issue and perpetuates a falsehood about (Product) RED. Easterly suggests that Vanity Fair portrays a "scary picture of a helpless, backward continent." He must not have read about Kenya's economic growth or Chinese investment in Africa or the Touareg music festival in Mali.


(RED)'s partners have raised more than $25 million for the Global Fund, with more than $19 million already at work in Rwanda and Swaziland. He ignored this too. That is five times the amount the Global Fund raised from private business in the previous four years and more than many governments (e.g., China, Australia) contributed in 2006.


The $100-million marketing number Easterly cites is wrong. The amount spent by our partners Gap, Motorola, Converse, Apple and Armani on marketing their (RED) products is less than half that.


Finally, the Vanity Fair article, "The Lazarus Effect," shows hundreds of thousands of Africans getting their medicine thanks in part to (RED). They are on the rebound. Even for an academic, these are hard stories to ignore.


BOBBY SHRIVER

Chairman, chief executive

(Product) RED

Los Angeles


http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion...ack=1&cset=true


BRAVO, BOBBY!!

Jamila is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 12:18 AM   #26
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington State
Posts: 3,861
Local Time: 05:24 AM
I'm not sure what I believe honestly. I wouldn't be at all suprised if Bono was wrong or right.
shart1780 is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 01:18 AM   #27
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 41,232
Local Time: 12:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by shart1780
I wouldn't be at all suprised if Bono was wrong or right.
Then why post anything? He's obviously spent years researching, and I know this for a fact for I know someone who's prayed on the mountainside with him and has been to several meetings with him.

What is your point of saying this?
BVS is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 03:14 AM   #28
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington State
Posts: 3,861
Local Time: 05:24 AM
Because I felt like expressing my view of it. Is that a problem? So you know someone who did something with Bono one time. Bono isn't a demi-god or anything. I don't trust him, or anyone else, solely because they spent years studying.
shart1780 is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 05:28 AM   #29
Blue Crack Addict
 
last unicorn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: lost in poetry
Posts: 19,446
Local Time: 06:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Jamila
Here is the reply by Bobby Shriver, CEO of (RED), to that nasty totally untrue article about Bono and his organizations for Africa that appeared in the 6 July 2007 edition of the LA Times:



Bright spots in Africa overlooked
July 10, 2007



Re "What Bono doesn't say about Africa," Opinion, July 6


What Vanity Fair did William Easterly read? He ignores the positive stories contained in the Africa issue and perpetuates a falsehood about (Product) RED. Easterly suggests that Vanity Fair portrays a "scary picture of a helpless, backward continent." He must not have read about Kenya's economic growth or Chinese investment in Africa or the Touareg music festival in Mali.


(RED)'s partners have raised more than $25 million for the Global Fund, with more than $19 million already at work in Rwanda and Swaziland. He ignored this too. That is five times the amount the Global Fund raised from private business in the previous four years and more than many governments (e.g., China, Australia) contributed in 2006.


The $100-million marketing number Easterly cites is wrong. The amount spent by our partners Gap, Motorola, Converse, Apple and Armani on marketing their (RED) products is less than half that.


Finally, the Vanity Fair article, "The Lazarus Effect," shows hundreds of thousands of Africans getting their medicine thanks in part to (RED). They are on the rebound. Even for an academic, these are hard stories to ignore.


BOBBY SHRIVER

Chairman, chief executive

(Product) RED

Los Angeles


http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion...ack=1&cset=true


BRAVO, BOBBY!!



Thank you Jamila! Good for Bobby to react that quickly to the LA Times article.
last unicorn is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 08:02 AM   #30
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 41,232
Local Time: 12:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by shart1780
I don't trust him, or anyone else, solely because they spent years studying.
Then who exactly would you use as a source on the subject?
BVS is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 08:22 AM   #31
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
sulawesigirl4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,416
Local Time: 12:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Jamila
He must not have read about Kenya's economic growth or Chinese investment in Africa or the Touareg music festival in Mali.
I happened upon the Vanity Fair issue when I was visiting a friend and stumbled across the article about the Festival du Desert in Mali. Nothing could have pleased me more but to see a huge picture of my friend Habib Koite splashed across the article. When I lived in Mali, I knew these people. I used to go dancing at the Hogon while Toumani Diabate played (just like in the article), and I met the organizer of the desert festival on many occasions. My friends and I would go out with Habib and other musicians after a show and stay up till three in the morning talking about life, culture, religion and politics. Reading the article brought back so many great memories not only of Mali but of the amazing resilience of the people who live there. There is a music scene that thrives completely outside the sphere of Clear Channel and Billboard. People in remote villages listen to local radio stations (often broadcast from their own village with local DJs) and do their chores to the strains of Oumou Sangare and Omar Koita. I've had conversations with complete strangers on the bus in Bamako in which they'll say, "we may be poor in money, but we're rich in culture." And they're right.

As for the festival itself, it has brought a lot of money into one of the poorest and bleakest parts of Mali and introduced a lot of people from outside Africa to amazing music they would not otherwise hear. Every year, a lot of money comes into the local economy from tourism and a lot of it is driven directly from this event. (I used to work as an advisor to the Ministry of Tourism when I lived there.) So while the economic situation is bad and while Malian cotton farmers continue to languish in debt because of subsidies to rich Western farmers that keep the price of cotton below the market value, there are still some bright spots. And I was very happy that this article showed us that. There are so many facets to the problem of poverty and therefore many facets to any "solution" that one might propose. In my experience on the ground, any solutions will likely be a mix of aid, investment, development of local infrastructure, education, and above all, a level playing field on the world market. Anyone who thinks that imposing a market economy and then just letting the "invisible hand" work it all out needs to get out and see things for themselves. It's never as simple as you'd like it to be.

That's just my opinion, for what it's worth.
__________________
"I can't change the world, but I can change the world in me." - Bono

sulawesigirl4 is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 10:52 AM   #32
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
Vincent Vega's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Berlin
Posts: 6,739
Local Time: 07:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by shart1780
Because I felt like expressing my view of it. Is that a problem? So you know someone who did something with Bono one time. Bono isn't a demi-god or anything. I don't trust him, or anyone else, solely because they spent years studying.
Well, there are many interviews with Bono, he has met almost every top-politician of the industrialised and the African countries, his wife opened up a business in Africa, he has co-founded organisation such as One or DATA, he is well respected among most experts, he has learned his stuff from Jeffrey Sachs, one of the world's most renowned economists (wait until I've got my degree ), he has started campaigning in the 1990's for debt relief where he managed to get his message across in Washington and Europe, and so on, and so on.
If you wanted to know about Bono's actual knowledge about this topic, just check out some interviews he's given on that subject. You'll realize that he doesn't answer real tough questions just sketchy, but with a tremendous background knowledge of about every country, its development since liberation, and its leaders...

He isn't a demi-god, that's right, but he is a regular visitor of African nations, and does his amount of research to know some more about the issue than someone solely reading in books or the newspaper about it.
Vincent Vega is offline  
Old 07-12-2007, 08:25 PM   #33
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Jamila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,454
Local Time: 11:24 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by last unicorn




Thank you Jamila! Good for Bobby to react that quickly to the LA Times article.


You're very welcomed, last unicorn.
Jamila is offline  
Old 07-13-2007, 08:14 AM   #34
War Child
 
Earl-Of-IMDb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: in a very peaceful place
Posts: 805
Local Time: 11:24 PM


not to you but to the journalist who wrote that crap article
Earl-Of-IMDb is offline  
Old 07-13-2007, 08:47 AM   #35
Refugee
 
BostonAnne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Posts: 2,052
Local Time: 01:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by sulawesigirl4


I happened upon the Vanity Fair issue when I was visiting a friend and stumbled across the article about the Festival du Desert in Mali. Nothing could have pleased me more but to see a huge picture of my friend Habib Koite splashed across the article. When I lived in Mali, I knew these people. I used to go dancing at the Hogon while Toumani Diabate played (just like in the article), and I met the organizer of the desert festival on many occasions.
I thought of you when I read this, so it was especially nice for me to read your post.
BostonAnne is offline  
Old 07-13-2007, 09:45 PM   #36
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington State
Posts: 3,861
Local Time: 05:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by BonoVoxSupastar


Then who exactly would you use as a source on the subject?
Someone who's views lined up most with mine after I did some research on the subject myself. Bono hasn't done more research than anyone on this planet, I can guarentee that. I think it's silly to think Bono is somehow the leading source of knowledge on the subject. I'm not gonna take his word for it just because he's Bono.
shart1780 is offline  
Old 07-13-2007, 10:17 PM   #37
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 41,232
Local Time: 12:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by shart1780


Someone who's views lined up most with mine after I did some research on the subject myself.
That's kind of a backwards logic don't you think? Shouldn't one be objective when researching a subject?

Quote:
Originally posted by shart1780

Bono hasn't done more research than anyone on this planet, I can guarentee that. I think it's silly to think Bono is somehow the leading source of knowledge on the subject. I'm not gonna take his word for it just because he's Bono.
No one claimed that he's the utmost expert. But you said you don't trust anyone "soley because they've spent years studying". Then who exactly would you trust? Do they have to have a set amount of years and conservative background for you to trust them? That statement just doesn't make any sense.

I agree we should never just take anyone's word, but this isn't some shmoe off the street that just decided to take up a cause.

Are you going to take someone's word who's been there once and studying econmics for 6 months over Bono, just because it is in line with your views? And your views are what? How much research have you done?
BVS is offline  
Old 07-14-2007, 10:28 AM   #38
Blue Crack Addict
 
last unicorn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: lost in poetry
Posts: 19,446
Local Time: 06:24 AM
No, Bono may not be the ultimate expert on anything, as he is saying himself, he is still learning more about the issue and never stops studying. But I think it's quite obvious that he has in fact done more research on this issue than most other people, he knows the right people, he has the connections, he is - as acknowledged by many renowned experts - indeed very knowledgeable on this issue. People who have worked with him or got to know him through his activism say that his mind is almost always focused on Africa and that he's doing a lot of background work, most of which is not known to the public. His "public" work that is shown in the media is just a part of his overall efforts for Africa. I think it's just not fair and shows no respect for the man to say that he is simply talking about these issues without having done enough research. And I am not saying that because he's Bono, but because I have learned so much about him and his work and heard so much about it from other people.
last unicorn is offline  
Old 07-14-2007, 11:25 AM   #39
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
sulawesigirl4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,416
Local Time: 12:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by BostonAnne
I thought of you when I read this, so it was especially nice for me to read your post.
Thank you for thinking of me and for the feedback. I was totally surprised and heart-warmed to read the article and I couldn't help but wish that my time in Mali had been just a little longer so that I could have made it to that particular event. When I was reading the article and nodding my head as to where the author was going and who he was meeting, I kept thinking that I would have loved to have been there to help out as a guide/translator. "Hello, Mr. Blackwell, but I think you should know that I'm here indirectly because of you. You signed this little band called U2, and then I was inspired by a guy called Bono to get off my ass and go to Africa and see if I couldn't help out at least a tiny bit." Oh well. I missed Bono's visit to Mali too by just a few months. Story of my life I guess. lol.

I must admit that it's a little amusing to watch people fight over who knows more about a place that pretty much none of them have ever even visited let alone know anything about. lol. Ah well. It's always easier to find "proof" to back up whatever notion one already believes in and much safer than having to engage in critical thinking. I'll say one thing for sure, I don't think anyone can go to Africa and not have their perspectives on a lot of things radically changed and in ways that would surprise you.
__________________
"I can't change the world, but I can change the world in me." - Bono

sulawesigirl4 is offline  
Old 07-14-2007, 03:40 PM   #40
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,563
Local Time: 01:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by sulawesigirl4


I'll say one thing for sure, I don't think anyone can go to Africa and not have their perspectives on a lot of things radically changed and in ways that would surprise you.
I did not go there for as long as you nor was I as involved as you, but I agree with this 100%. It's not even so much that being in Africa changes things, but when you can sit down and have conversations with the people that all this "research" and "proof" is about, it totally changes your perspective. When you can stay in their homes and work along side of them as equals, even for just a month, everything changes, and changes in ways you don't expect (for example, my experience there certainly did not make me feel more sorry for people, it taught me that doing things because I feel sorry for people isn't really fair to them at all because deep down, you're only doing it to mask your own guilt and feel better about yourself). I think that I have a far more optimistic perspective on what Africa can do for itself now than before I went. The savior complex of the West is pretty embarrassing.
__________________

Liesje is offline  
 

Tags
africa, bono, bono africa

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com
×