Kiss the Future documentary

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cobl04

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Been a LONG time since I've made a thread in here, maybe I'll regret it, but we'll see.

I saw Kiss the Future. It's hard to find information about its release, I see it's been shown at a bunch of film festivals and I saw it at the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) last night.

I thought it was absolutely fantastic. For those who don't know, it's about the Bosnian War, Bill Carter and U2, its title taken from Bono's "fuck the past, kiss the future" proclamation at their Popmart gig in Sarajevo after the war ended (which I'd not seen before).

Going into it, I was a little worried it'd be U2 worship and too much of Bono crapping on, but a huge credit to the filmmakers (it's directed by Nenad Cicin-Sain, written by Bill and produced by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck) the focus is really on the Bosnians who suffered at the hands of their oppressors. U2 don't get a mention until about 15 minutes in, and even from that point, they are never really placed above the story.

I didn't know much about the war, it was just so wonderful to see old footage, hear from local artists (who play a huge role in the film and the story) about their joyful acts of artistic resistance, and really I felt centred them as the outside world started to take an interest. You can see that Bill Carter had to prove he was really on their side and not just another outsider with a camera, and it's awesome seeing how the relationship with U2 came together.

They show a bit of the footage of Bono's interview with Bill for Bosnian TV before an Italian ZooTV show, and I was really struck by the change in Bono's body language and tone of voice. At the start, it feels like he's just another slightly interested, too-cool rock star, but then it cuts away to Bill and some of the Bosnian artists, and then it cuts back to Bono and and Bill, after Bill has started telling Bono about the artistic resistance, and all of a sudden Bono is facing Bill directly, looking right at him, smiling and engaged in the conversation. That's when I was like, "yep, Bono genuinely cares here".

And then you get to see the evolution of the segments with Bill, of course we've all seen these, and they're both empowering and raw, particularly the two with the women who call bullshit on the whole thing. I like how the band didn't get defensive, they were just like, yeah, you're right... there's a scene with one of the band's crew who pulled the pin on it for the following show, and unfortunately I've forgotten how the band responded and where it went next... if anyone can recall, let me know, because I'd hate to think they just sooked. Actually, I think it then went into 'well, how can we do something more', and it evolved into Miss Sarajevo and eventually the Popmart show, but if someone's got more info, please let me know. Anyway, I can't think of many artists in history who would be open to derailing their own live shows. There's also some incredibly heartwarming footage of some Bosnians sending messages to loved ones in the audience from the war in Bosnia.

We then see the Sarajevo beauty pageant, and then the last portion of the film is about the Sarajevo show, and it's the best part. Seeing and hearing the perspectives from the local Bosnian artists and activists, and their transition from skepticism about Bill and U2 (and whether they'd show up) turn into elation was very special. The shots of the crowd in the concert are spine-tingling. What a fucking phenomenal thing to see footage of, and fuck me dead, could you imagine being there? (If there's anyone here who was there, please post!) And the journey of the concert itself is so well-told, with Bono losing his voice and the crowd helping out, there's a real sense of something spiritual and communal happening. The ending, with all the talking heads, from the Bosnian artists to Bono, Edge and Adam, watching One, made me cry like a baby. It's very powerful, seeing the artists sing silently along, and it cuts to Adam at one point, who is in tears.

I learned a lot about the war, the West's wilful ignorance of it, them finally stepping in after an ethnic cleansing massacre of Bosnian Muslims and then Bill Clinton being like "so I dropped some bombs and that was it".

As a U2 superfan I'd have liked a little more time spent on the development of Miss Sarajevo, and I think it's a sad, frustrating and upsetting indictment on the band and the documentary that not a single second of any Pop song is played during the Popmart Sarajevo segment (they make it seem as if the show opens with I Will Follow).

For all the shit that U2 get, I think this documentary is a pretty incredible demonstration of their integrity and healing power. The absolute best thing about it though is the Bosnian artists who take part, and their beautiful authenticity, spirit, reflection, strength, resilience and vulnerability.
 
it's a sad, frustrating and upsetting indictment on the band and the documentary that not a single second of any Pop song is played during the Popmart Sarajevo segment (they make it seem as if the show opens with I Will Follow).

That's...infuriating.
 
Been a LONG time since I've made a thread in here, maybe I'll regret it, but we'll see.



I saw Kiss the Future. It's hard to find information about its release, I see it's been shown at a bunch of film festivals and I saw it at the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) last night.



I thought it was absolutely fantastic. For those who don't know, it's about the Bosnian War, Bill Carter and U2, its title taken from Bono's "fuck the past, kiss the future" proclamation at their Popmart gig in Sarajevo after the war ended (which I'd not seen before).



Going into it, I was a little worried it'd be U2 worship and too much of Bono crapping on, but a huge credit to the filmmakers (it's directed by Nenad Cicin-Sain, written by Bill and produced by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck) the focus is really on the Bosnians who suffered at the hands of their oppressors. U2 don't get a mention until about 15 minutes in, and even from that point, they are never really placed above the story.



I didn't know much about the war, it was just so wonderful to see old footage, hear from local artists (who play a huge role in the film and the story) about their joyful acts of artistic resistance, and really I felt centred them as the outside world started to take an interest. You can see that Bill Carter had to prove he was really on their side and not just another outsider with a camera, and it's awesome seeing how the relationship with U2 came together.



They show a bit of the footage of Bono's interview with Bill for Bosnian TV before an Italian ZooTV show, and I was really struck by the change in Bono's body language and tone of voice. At the start, it feels like he's just another slightly interested, too-cool rock star, but then it cuts away to Bill and some of the Bosnian artists, and then it cuts back to Bono and and Bill, after Bill has started telling Bono about the artistic resistance, and all of a sudden Bono is facing Bill directly, looking right at him, smiling and engaged in the conversation. That's when I was like, "yep, Bono genuinely cares here".



And then you get to see the evolution of the segments with Bill, of course we've all seen these, and they're both empowering and raw, particularly the two with the women who call bullshit on the whole thing. I like how the band didn't get defensive, they were just like, yeah, you're right... there's a scene with one of the band's crew who pulled the pin on it for the following show, and unfortunately I've forgotten how the band responded and where it went next... if anyone can recall, let me know, because I'd hate to think they just sooked. Actually, I think it then went into 'well, how can we do something more', and it evolved into Miss Sarajevo and eventually the Popmart show, but if someone's got more info, please let me know. Anyway, I can't think of many artists in history who would be open to derailing their own live shows. There's also some incredibly heartwarming footage of some Bosnians sending messages to loved ones in the audience from the war in Bosnia.



We then see the Sarajevo beauty pageant, and then the last portion of the film is about the Sarajevo show, and it's the best part. Seeing and hearing the perspectives from the local Bosnian artists and activists, and their transition from skepticism about Bill and U2 (and whether they'd show up) turn into elation was very special. The shots of the crowd in the concert are spine-tingling. What a fucking phenomenal thing to see footage of, and fuck me dead, could you imagine being there? (If there's anyone here who was there, please post!) And the journey of the concert itself is so well-told, with Bono losing his voice and the crowd helping out, there's a real sense of something spiritual and communal happening. The ending, with all the talking heads, from the Bosnian artists to Bono, Edge and Adam, watching One, made me cry like a baby. It's very powerful, seeing the artists sing silently along, and it cuts to Adam at one point, who is in tears.



I learned a lot about the war, the West's wilful ignorance of it, them finally stepping in after an ethnic cleansing massacre of Bosnian Muslims and then Bill Clinton being like "so I dropped some bombs and that was it".



As a U2 superfan I'd have liked a little more time spent on the development of Miss Sarajevo, and I think it's a sad, frustrating and upsetting indictment on the band and the documentary that not a single second of any Pop song is played during the Popmart Sarajevo segment (they make it seem as if the show opens with I Will Follow).



For all the shit that U2 get, I think this documentary is a pretty incredible demonstration of their integrity and healing power. The absolute best thing about it though is the Bosnian artists who take part, and their beautiful authenticity, spirit, reflection, strength, resilience and vulnerability.



Thx for sharing, can’t wait to see it!!
 
I am born in Australia, of Bosnian background, and have just returned to Oz from a 5 week European holiday, the last fortnight I spent in Sarajevo.


I was fortunate enough to see Bono and The Edge arrive at the red carpet for the Sarajevo Film Festival, and even more fortunate to get tickets to the premiere of Kiss the Future in Sarajevo, where Bono, The Edge, Christiane Amanpour and Bill Carter were in attendance. A once in a lifetime experience.


The film as expected received a standing ovation by the crowd, I'll say it was about 1500 in attendance in the open air cinema. Bono, The Edge, Bill, Christiane, and the rest of the crew were in a VIP seating area only about 5 seats away from where we were seated. It was a surreal experience, seeing them walk up to the stage for the speeches section, and as they left you could see them taken aback by the continued applause as they exited.


The crowd went through a variety of emotions throughout the film, the silence during the war footage, the laughter at certain moments when jokes were made by the local artists, and the applause when Bono yelled Viva Sarajevo, and City of the Future during the concert.


I thoroughly enjoyed the documentary, it was very high quality and well put together, and as mentioned it didn't serve as an advertisement for the band, but rather how important the band was for the city during that time. If you speak to Bosnians in Sarajevo, they treasure the band for what they have done.



I highly recommend this documentary, even though I am biased. If anyone is interested, I have some crappy clips I recorded on my phone, including Bono singing Redemption Song.


















 
Thanks for sharing your take on the film, and to SkenU2 for posting about the film festival.

Longtime lurker, rare poster here. This is great timing, as I just read Bill's Fools Rush In and then rented Miss Sarajevo on Vimeo, later finding a cheap DVD copy with bonus material on Amazon. The book and video are well worth the time for anyone who is interested. I've been reading a lot about the conflict since -- I was interested at the time, but there was less info available, obviously -- and am very eager to see Kiss The Future.
 

Under a deal between AMC and Fifth Season, select AMC locations will debut the film on February 23 for what is described as a full theatrical run. Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton, Christiane Amanpour, and former Pres. Bill Clinton are among those who appear in the film directed by Nenad Cicin-Sain and produced by Matt Damon, Ben Affleck, and Sarah Anthony. Kiss the Future will become available to stream later this year exclusively on Paramount+.
 
Been a LONG time since I've made a thread in here, maybe I'll regret it, but we'll see.

I saw Kiss the Future. It's hard to find information about its release, I see it's been shown at a bunch of film festivals and I saw it at the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) last night.

I thought it was absolutely fantastic. For those who don't know, it's about the Bosnian War, Bill Carter and U2, its title taken from Bono's "**** the past, kiss the future" proclamation at their Popmart gig in Sarajevo after the war ended (which I'd not seen before).

Going into it, I was a little worried it'd be U2 worship and too much of Bono crapping on, but a huge credit to the filmmakers (it's directed by Nenad Cicin-Sain, written by Bill and produced by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck) the focus is really on the Bosnians who suffered at the hands of their oppressors. U2 don't get a mention until about 15 minutes in, and even from that point, they are never really placed above the story.

I didn't know much about the war, it was just so wonderful to see old footage, hear from local artists (who play a huge role in the film and the story) about their joyful acts of artistic resistance, and really I felt centred them as the outside world started to take an interest. You can see that Bill Carter had to prove he was really on their side and not just another outsider with a camera, and it's awesome seeing how the relationship with U2 came together.

They show a bit of the footage of Bono's interview with Bill for Bosnian TV before an Italian ZooTV show, and I was really struck by the change in Bono's body language and tone of voice. At the start, it feels like he's just another slightly interested, too-cool rock star, but then it cuts away to Bill and some of the Bosnian artists, and then it cuts back to Bono and and Bill, after Bill has started telling Bono about the artistic resistance, and all of a sudden Bono is facing Bill directly, looking right at him, smiling and engaged in the conversation. That's when I was like, "yep, Bono genuinely cares here".

And then you get to see the evolution of the segments with Bill, of course we've all seen these, and they're both empowering and raw, particularly the two with the women who call bullshit on the whole thing. I like how the band didn't get defensive, they were just like, yeah, you're right... there's a scene with one of the band's crew who pulled the pin on it for the following show, and unfortunately I've forgotten how the band responded and where it went next... if anyone can recall, let me know, because I'd hate to think they just sooked. Actually, I think it then went into 'well, how can we do something more', and it evolved into Miss Sarajevo and eventually the Popmart show, but if someone's got more info, please let me know. Anyway, I can't think of many artists in history who would be open to derailing their own live shows. There's also some incredibly heartwarming footage of some Bosnians sending messages to loved ones in the audience from the war in Bosnia.

We then see the Sarajevo beauty pageant, and then the last portion of the film is about the Sarajevo show, and it's the best part. Seeing and hearing the perspectives from the local Bosnian artists and activists, and their transition from skepticism about Bill and U2 (and whether they'd show up) turn into elation was very special. The shots of the crowd in the concert are spine-tingling. What a ****ing phenomenal thing to see footage of, and **** me dead, could you imagine being there? (If there's anyone here who was there, please post!) And the journey of the concert itself is so well-told, with Bono losing his voice and the crowd helping out, there's a real sense of something spiritual and communal happening. The ending, with all the talking heads, from the Bosnian artists to Bono, Edge and Adam, watching One, made me cry like a baby. It's very powerful, seeing the artists sing silently along, and it cuts to Adam at one point, who is in tears.

I learned a lot about the war, the West's wilful ignorance of it, them finally stepping in after an ethnic cleansing massacre of Bosnian Muslims and then Bill Clinton being like "so I dropped some bombs and that was it".

As a U2 superfan I'd have liked a little more time spent on the development of Miss Sarajevo, and I think it's a sad, frustrating and upsetting indictment on the band and the documentary that not a single second of any Pop song is played during the Popmart Sarajevo segment (they make it seem as if the show opens with I Will Follow).

For all the **** that U2 get, I think this documentary is a pretty incredible demonstration of their integrity and healing power. The absolute best thing about it though is the Bosnian artists who take part, and their beautiful authenticity, spirit, reflection, strength, resilience and vulnerability.
I realize that it has been released to a select few cinemas but the only showing it on February 21st in my big city. I wonder why I have to wait 3 weeks to see it??? Thanks for the info you have provided!!?
 
I was at the show in Sarajevo and didn't know the whole story till today when I watched Kiss the Future (alone in a large theater) What a remarkable doc. U2 caught my interest when I saw the movie guide but the people of Sarajevo captured my heart by the end of the film. Full range of emotions watching this. So glad I made the trek to Bosnia all those years ago
 
Caught it last night. Beautiful and heartbreaking. Yet another reminder, as I just returned from catching them at Sphere this past weekend for the 2nd time, of how ESSENTIAL U2 has been and continues to be.

A force for good, living out their family & band prayer to be useful. So grateful that we still have these lads.
 
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