ANOTHER ONE (species) BITES THE DUST! - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind > Free Your Mind Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-13-2006, 09:48 PM   #1
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Jamila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,454
Local Time: 04:14 AM
ANOTHER ONE (species) BITES THE DUST!

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Con...path=News/News



Rare Chinese dolphin declared extinct
Dec. 13, 2006. 10:36 AM

CHARLES HUTZLER
ASSOCIATED PRESS



BEIJING — An expedition searching for a rare Yangtze River dolphin ended Wednesday without a single sighting and with the team's leader saying one of the world's oldest species was effectively extinct.



The white dolphin known as baiji, shy and nearly blind, dates back some 20 million years. Its disappearance is believed to be the first time in a half-century, since hunting killed off the Caribbean monk seal, that a large aquatic mammal has been driven to extinction.



A few baiji may still exist in their native Yangtze habitat in eastern China but not in sufficient numbers to breed and ward off extinction, said August Pfluger, the Swiss co-leader of the joint Chinese-foreign expedition.



"We have to accept the fact, that the Baiji is functionally extinct. We lost the race," Pfluger said in a statement released by the expedition. "It is a tragedy, a loss not only for China, but for the entire world. We are all incredibly sad.''



Overfishing and shipping traffic, whose engines interfere with the sonar the baiji uses to navigate and feed, are likely the main reasons for the mammal's declining numbers, Pfluger said. Though the Yangtze is polluted, water samples taken by the expedition every 30 miles did not show high concentrations of toxic substances, the statement said.



For nearly six weeks, Pfluger's team of 30 scientists scoured a 1,000-mile heavily trafficked stretch of the Yangtze, where the baiji once thrived. The expedition's two boats, equipped with high-tech binoculars and underwater microphones, trailed each other an hour apart without radio contact so that a sighting by one vessel would not prejudice the other.


Around 400 baiji were believed to be living in the Yangtze in the 1980s. The last full-fledged search, in 1997, yielded 13 confirmed sightings, and a fisherman claimed to have seen a baiji in 2004, Pfluger said in an earlier interview.


At least 20 to 25 baiji would now be needed to give the species a chance to survive, the group's statement said, citing Wang Ding, a hydrobiologist and China's foremost campaigner for the baiji.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know that there are those in this forum that will like to expound on how this ancient species going extinct is just the "nature of things" but I don't see anything unpreventable and/or "natural" in the list given above of what may have caused this ancient species demise.


I have been monitoring this situation for this species for the last decade and have watched their numbers increasingly decline while the world did nothing.


Now that this species is gone which will be next?


The polar bear comes to mind....unless we learn something from this sad situation and change the ways that we interact with the natural world.


Thanks for your time and consideration.
__________________

Jamila is offline  
Old 12-13-2006, 09:54 PM   #2
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
BrownEyedBoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: San Pedro Sula, Honduras
Posts: 3,510
Local Time: 04:14 AM
We'll live.
__________________

BrownEyedBoy is offline  
Old 12-13-2006, 10:37 PM   #3
Blue Crack Distributor
 
corianderstem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 64,498
Local Time: 03:14 AM
And I guess that's all that matters, isn't it?
corianderstem is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 04:36 AM   #4
ONE
love, blood, life
 
A_Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: The Wild West
Posts: 12,518
Local Time: 08:14 PM
A range of zero is not a good thing for a species.
A_Wanderer is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 05:38 AM   #5
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Jamila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,454
Local Time: 04:14 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by BrownEyedBoy
We'll live.

Unfortunately, it's that kind of attitude in life that will ultimately destroy it on earth - including human life.

Thanks for those who care enough to at least read this thread.
Jamila is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 06:11 AM   #6
Refugee
 
mandy1973's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Far away...this ship is taking me far away
Posts: 2,460
Local Time: 08:44 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by BrownEyedBoy
We'll live.
You're joking...right?
I must say, that's a pretty sad attitude to have.
mandy1973 is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 06:41 AM   #7
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
YBORCITY's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: FLA
Posts: 5,384
Local Time: 05:14 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by BrownEyedBoy
We'll live.
Maybe............Maybe not


YBORCITY is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 07:11 AM   #8
ONE
love, blood, life
 
A_Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: The Wild West
Posts: 12,518
Local Time: 08:14 PM
No we will, human beings are and always have been spectacular opportunists, from the most primative tribes to modern societies we can use up resources and wipe out species; the only limit is technology and populations.

Of course I think that beneficial applications of technology are worthwhile pursuits, genetic modification to reduce land use for agriculture and alternative energy sources are some examples.
A_Wanderer is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 07:17 AM   #9
The Fly
 
Dwight Schrute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 57
Local Time: 10:14 AM
Humans are more virus like than animal like. We love to exploit everything that we can with little regard to anything but our own self-interest. Perhaps one day we will burnout, but that won't happen before we infect many other species with our disease.
Dwight Schrute is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 07:26 AM   #10
ONE
love, blood, life
 
A_Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: The Wild West
Posts: 12,518
Local Time: 08:14 PM
Were not like a virus in terms of expansion and populating areas, and a virus does not act with malicious intent (and neither does the human species). We are a species of animal like any other with the crucial ability to adapt our environment for our survival. Species don't act with ill-will, it's a question of survival.

Now we may reach a stage where human development can exist without dramatic impact on the natural world, but that can only be achieved with technological development and equitable distribution of that technology. Key word is the distribution of tech because in supporting a developing world with rising living standards with existing resources and means of resource exploitation is not viable.
A_Wanderer is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 08:11 AM   #11
Blue Crack Addict
 
verte76's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: hoping for changes
Posts: 23,331
Local Time: 10:14 AM
This is a shame. I hate it that so many of these animals were killed. Just like the passenger pigeon....................
verte76 is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 09:35 AM   #12
War Child
 
Butterscotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 716
Local Time: 10:14 AM
This is very, very sad. China's respect for life is below zero. It's tragic there's nothing anyone can do about it. On top of their human rights violations, their crimes against animals, historical places and the enviornment are another wall of shame.
Butterscotch is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 09:43 AM   #13
ONE
love, blood, life
 
A_Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: The Wild West
Posts: 12,518
Local Time: 08:14 PM
It's a nation rolling out industry to meet the needs of the west, it isn't an issue of blame.
A_Wanderer is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 09:44 AM   #14
War Child
 
Butterscotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 716
Local Time: 10:14 AM
For more on their pathetic track record, check out this chilling report:

http://www.care2.com/news/member/505984425/142625
Butterscotch is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 10:01 AM   #15
ONE
love, blood, life
 
A_Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: The Wild West
Posts: 12,518
Local Time: 08:14 PM
Whats chilling about that, it is a public health issue - rabies isn't fun and dogs like that aren't part of a natural ecosystem.
A_Wanderer is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 10:50 AM   #16
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 17,787
Local Time: 06:14 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by A_Wanderer
It's a nation rolling out industry to meet the needs of the west, it isn't an issue of blame.
That's bullshit.

Before "rolling out industry" the Chinese had a good human rights and general civil rights records? Yeah, right. Life is cheap in China, whether you're human or not.
anitram is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 11:06 AM   #17
ONE
love, blood, life
 
A_Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: The Wild West
Posts: 12,518
Local Time: 08:14 PM
Yeah but last time I checked as an agrarian society they werent producing anywhere near as much industrial waste or big dam projects. If were talking about human impact on nature then industrialisation is a consideration.
A_Wanderer is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 11:16 AM   #18
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 17,787
Local Time: 06:14 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by A_Wanderer
If were talking about human impact on nature then industrialisation is a consideration.
Or a convenient excuse to allow them to continue behaving in contempt of the environment.

Chinese animal and human life is cheap. Their government is truly shameful. But they give the US lots of money and cheap toys for sale at Walmart so that it becomes immaterial.
anitram is offline  
Old 12-14-2006, 12:48 PM   #19
Blue Crack Addict
 
U2Girl1978's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: At the altar of the dark star
Posts: 19,374
Local Time: 05:14 AM
I think it's sad that some people have no compassion for the animals that are becoming extinct. It's really nice to know how everyone cares so little about the environment.
U2Girl1978 is offline  
Old 12-17-2006, 06:00 PM   #20
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Jamila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,454
Local Time: 04:14 AM
The next species that is destined to bite the dust unless better ways are found to save them:


Polar Bear Populations Shrinking as Arctic Ice Melts


GLAND, Switzerland, December 15, 2006 (ENS) - Polar bears are losing their icy Arctic habitat to climate change, and five out of the world's 19 polar bear populations are now in decline, polar bear experts said in a report released today.



A 30 percent decline in the size of the total polar bear population within the next 35 to 50 years is likely, the IUCN-World Conservation Union’s Polar Bear Specialist Group said in its report. An estimated 20,000 and 25,000 polar bears exist today.



"The principal cause of this decline is climatic warming and its consequent negative affects on the sea ice habitat of polar bears. In some areas, contaminants may have an additive negative influence," the report states.
The Polar Bear Specialist Group reports that the two best studied polar bear sub-populations in the world have declined over the past two decades.


The western Hudson Bay population in Canada has declined by 22 percent during that period, and the southern Beaufort Sea population in the United States and Canada has declined by 17 percent.


The other three populations in decline are those in Baffin Bay and Kane Basin – shared between Greenland and Canada – and Norwegian Bay in Canada.



"Climate change is the main threat to polar bears and is clearly implicated in the western Hudson Bay sub-population. It is likely also a key factor in the Southern Beaufort Sea,” said Professor Andrew Derocher of the University of Alberta, who chairs the IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group.

“Climate stabilization is the key conservation action now for polar bears," Derocher said.



Dr. Andrew Derocher, chair of the IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group measures the skull length of an adult male polar bear to assess age related growth patterns. (Photo courtesy U. Alberta)
Findings of drowning polar bears, cannibalism, increased numbers of problem seeking food near Arctic communities were reported from many areas. These observations are consistent with predicted changes caused by climate warming.
The report's findings have prompted WWF to issue an urgent call to action to the governments of the world to cut carbon pollution, the cause of Arctic warming


Declining populations of polar bears indicate that the entire Arctic is under immense stress as a result of climate change, WWF warned.



"The polar bear’s powerful grip on the Arctic is slipping," said Stefan Norris, head of conservation with the WWF International Arctic Programme.


"We need to stop run-away warming," Norris said. "Climate change is melting the ice-bear’s toe-hold on life. This bad news for polar bears is also bad news for other Arctic species, and for the indigenous peoples whose traditional ways of life depend on them."

In May, polar bears for the first time were listed as Vulnerable to extinction on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.



Polar bears are treated separately from the other bear species, because the management of polar bears is guided by the International Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears signed in Oslo, Norway in 1973 by the five polar range states - Canada, Denmark, Norway, USA, and the former USSR. The Agreement is the action plan for polar bears.



The Polar Bear Specialist Group has 16 members, all research scientists from the five polar bear range states.

The Polar Bear Specialist Group meets every three to five years to review and exchange information on progress in the research and management of polar bears throughout the Arctic and to review the worldwide status of polar bears.



The newly published report is the proceedings of the 14th meeting of group that was held in Seattle, Washington June 20–24, 2005, under the chairmanship of Scott Schliebe of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The chairmanship of the Polar Bear Specialist Group was passed to Professor Derocher at the Seattle meeting.



Also attending as invited specialists were representatives from the Greenland Home Rule Government, the Alaska Nanuuq Commission, the Inuvialuit Game Council and Wildlife Management Advisory Council, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated of Canada, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Denmark's National Environmental Research Institute.


A new analysis of the long-term subpopulation data base in Western Hudson Bay detailed in the Group's report confirms the size of that subpopulation has declined from 1,200 to less than 1,000.


The Group concludes the decline was caused by reductions in condition and survival, especially of young bears, because climatic warming has caused the sea ice to break up about three weeks earlier now than it did only 30 years ago. As a result, polar bears have less time to feed and store the fat needed to survive on shore for four months before the ice refreezes.



Significant reductions in the apparent survival of ringed seal pups and changes in the diet of sea birds in northern Hudson Bay, coincident with larger amounts of open water earlier in the summer, have also been reported.



"Taken together," the Group states, "these results suggest that unknown changes in the marine ecosystem of Hudson Bay are now underway."

Similarly, the minimum extent of multi-year ice in the polar basin continues to decline at the rate of eight to 10 percent per decade, resulting in unusually extensive areas of open water in regions such as the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas and East Greenland.



High levels of PCBs and pesticides were found in East Greenland polar bears. There was a strong indication of a relationship between contaminants and skull mineral density, indicating possible disruption of the bone mineral composition, the Group reports, saying the changes were related to aging, infections and chronic exposure.

The Group emphasized the importance of continuing to monitor polar bear subpopulations in order to quantitatively assess the affects of climatic warming and of contaminants on polar bears.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/dec2...6-12-15-04.asp



Joy to the world....
__________________

Jamila is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com
×