Tips for Making a Mix Flow! - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Lemonade Stand > Just the Bang and the Clatter
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-27-2010, 12:52 PM   #1
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
Cute Irish Bono's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,979
Local Time: 01:07 PM
Tips for Making a Mix Flow!

I am a mix CD for a friend of mine and I would like some tips to make a mix CD flow from one song to the next. Are there certain artists that sound good together? (Example: Broken Social Scene and My Morning Jacket). Do you do fast songs and then a slow song afterwards? After all these years of making DIs playlists, what is your take?
__________________

__________________
Cute Irish Bono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 01:59 PM   #2
The Male
 
LemonMelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hollywoo
Posts: 65,813
Local Time: 10:07 AM
Is your friend named Phanan? Is this a roundabout way of asking for his email?

Flow? WTF?: The Well‐Adjusted's Guide To Playlists

Going on the assumption that your friend doesn't care in the slightest what is on this list and that you have free rein to do literally anything you want with it, the first thing you're going to want to do is decide how long you want this list to be. I approach single and double discs differently; the former is less likely to cover a lot of ground, while the latter gives me the license to do whatthefuckever. Since this is for a friend, I'm assuming it's going to be a single disc. For a list of this kind, I do recommend a certain level of planning. Choosing tracks for it is something I don't really want to delve into because part of the fun of putting together these lists is finding ways to make something eclectic work in spite of itself, but don't make your experience an unpleasant one. Part of this is working out a perceivable unifying theme. Themes become impractical with double discs, but for single discs, having a specific sound or purpose in mind is advisable. It could be a certain time period, genre, or lyrical theme ‐ all of the above will make the job of sequencing it a lot easier.

Once the songs you want are in front of you (I recommend having at least 10 more than you are allotted to give yourself room to experiment; classic lists hardly ever coalesce out of the first 20 songs you pick), pick out the songs you want as your bookends. Openers could be fucking epic, or you could choose to have an intro leading into an epic song. Either way, for a single disc, you want to make your time count. Keep that in mind throughout. Your closer should be equally epic, if not more so, and unify the preceding songs. Having your bookends in place will give you wiggle room to radiate outward a few songs on each side of the list before you inevitably hit that wall somewhere in the middle where the list appears to lose its purpose. In that slot, you want to punctuate the list with something attention‐grabbing that reaffirms the fact that they should be listening to what you've made. Consider it the moment when you dream it all up again before the dash to the finish. The last handful of songs should gradually intensify and push the emotional arc of your list to near its peak. If your list is an upbeat one, this may not apply. On a lot of lists, however, this is when the darker shades are thrown in. Either way, you don't want your closer to feel tacked on.

There are a bunch of tips I could give you about sequencing that I have picked up along the way, but the fact is that we all hear things differently, and even segues are subjective. There are certain methods I have found that work well for me, however. One is to listen to the individual instruments of the two songs you're attempting to link together to see if anything will carry over naturally. Occasionally, a piece of one track (most often drums) will sound similar in another and that will cause the listener to perceive the songs as a natural pair. Another, the 10 second sequencing method, is among the most common and, in my opinion, overused. Using this, you listen to only the first and last 10 seconds of a track in order to prevent tracks from clashing. By themselves, these methods can work well for clever segues, but I actually do not recommend relying heavily on them, especially on double discs where the momentum is key and people stop paying attention to the individual segues somewhere in the middle. The definition of "flow" tends to give priority to mood and coherence anyway, so remember that before you try to get clever and unwittingly tack together Isaac Hayes and Talking Heads because the bass lines of both tracks work together well in your head.

I've made so many of these lists that it has become a science of sorts, but never let it become a ritual. Playlists serve many different functions, and, humorously enough, there are even some occasions when shitty sequencing can be preferable; if you're making a list of artists that your friend has never heard of, why would you want a list that glides right by, emphasizing the list itself over the individual tracks? The response would more likely be "yeah, I dug it" instead of "holy fuck, I loved those songs by so and so." So yeah, don't let your ego/nerdy fun get in the way of the listener's experience. I probably should have written that in the first paragraph, but oh wellz.

Hope this helps.
__________________

__________________


Now.
LemonMelon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 09:54 PM   #3
Blue Crack Addict
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: gone
Posts: 17,891
Local Time: 01:07 PM
put good songs on it
__________________
Chizip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 10:56 PM   #4
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
Cute Irish Bono's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,979
Local Time: 01:07 PM
Thanks for the great tips, LemonMelon! My friend will really enjoy my playlist. And in return from practicing the art of flow Phanan will be happy too on my next DI list. I like the first method with related intruments matching up together. I never thought about that method before.

On Jango it says Coldplay is similar to Radiohead. Is it a good approach to link them together? Or do you believe it has nothing to do with related artists but merely how well any two songs (regardless of genre) match up together?


Quote:
Originally Posted by LemonMelon View Post
:

Flow? WTF?: The Well‐Adjusted's Guide To Playlists

Another, the 10 second sequencing method, is among the most common and, in my opinion, overused. Using this, you listen to only the first and last 10 seconds of a track in order to prevent tracks from clashing.
I know when a song sounds after another song. But I have some many songs to choose from and there are endless possible sequences! If you have an all-out rocker like "Rockin' in the Free World" would a slow song like "Drowing Man" sound good after it?
__________________
Cute Irish Bono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 10:59 PM   #5
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
Cute Irish Bono's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,979
Local Time: 01:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chizip View Post
put good songs on it
ha, ha, very funny but very true.
__________________
Cute Irish Bono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 11:31 PM   #6
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 40,697
Local Time: 12:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cute Irish Bono View Post
I know when a song sounds after another song. But I have some many songs to choose from and there are endless possible sequences! If you have an all-out rocker like "Rockin' in the Free World" would a slow song like "Drowing Man" sound good after it?
What you could do is list the songs you'd like to put on it, group them in importance, like "must have", "would like to", and "maybe".

Describe what you would like to acheive with the mix, and then ask us the order?

People in here love to make "setlists".

Just an idea
__________________
BVS is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2010, 02:31 AM   #7
Blue Crack Addict
 
Moonlit_Angel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: In a dimension known as the Twilight Zone...do de doo doo, do de doo doo...
Posts: 19,271
Local Time: 12:07 PM
That's a good idea. I'd be curious to see that, too, definitely would help.

Personally, when I make mixes, I usually go by mood and similarity in sound. So for instance, I would probably put a Coldplay song and a Radiohead song next to each other, 'cause they're likely to be more similar in tempo and mood, and probably wouldn't put "Rockin' In The Free World" next to "Drowning Man", unless I was specifically going for a drastic change event. It also depends on the mix and who it'd be for-sometimes I like to start off with the slower songs and lead up to the more upbeat, energetic ones, sometimes the other way around. Or if two artists are connected somehow, like I've got a song by a guy and another song by his son, I'll put those next to each other.

Angela
__________________
Moonlit_Angel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2010, 01:20 PM   #8
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
Cute Irish Bono's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,979
Local Time: 01:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVS View Post
What you could do is list the songs you'd like to put on it, group them in importance, like "must have", "would like to", and "maybe".
Good idea. And good ideas too, Angela. Keep the suggestions coming! This playlist will be awesome!
__________________
Cute Irish Bono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2010, 03:31 PM   #9
LMP
Blue Crack Supplier
 
LMP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 37,609
Local Time: 12:07 PM
I structure any mix like a traditional tape mix, with a Side A and Side B, both with their respective opener/closer combo. All of what LM said is absolutely right, too. Though I may try to stick to a framework and prefer to pair similar-sounding tracks, avoiding obvious choices, like the Coldplay/Radiohead combo mentioned earlier, is always key. That's mostly because it's an insult to Radiohead.

Think of it as an assembly of peaks and valleys. Pop some up-tempo tracks together, then roll to a different sound in the next burst, then move somewhere else. If you can connect the first and last tracks into some sort of infinity loop, then kudos to you.
__________________

__________________
LMP is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com