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Old 12-19-2011, 11:20 PM   #321
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I'm sorry sue4u2



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Energy.

Look what North Dakota and western Pennsylvania are doing in this "jobless" recovery. Dangerous but good paying jobs in coal, refineries, pipelines, natural gas and offshore drilling. Not to mention trucking, building and servicing equipment and local jobs created in a boom. And the middle class benefits from lower energy costs.

President Solyndra sees things differently however.
Yeah, like Solyndra is the first government funded company/bank/wall street firm, oil & or gas company - do I need to go on? - etc. to go under.
Oh my goddess!! impeach the President.

No doubt we have to depend on oil and coal for a bit longer, but if we don't start investing in substainable alternatives we are screwed. Europe is building total substainable buildings (solar, wind & thermal w/ hydrogen storage) and Germany is leading the way in alternative fuels, also.
Investment in Education in this country is going to have make a drastic reform in order to teach the new world technology needed to implement these changes. If we don't stop squabbling over party politics and stupid stubborn ideologies, that both sides are guilty of, then forget the future.
Our childrens, childern, (if that long) will be living as slaves to whoever perfects it first.

(PS: I didn't get evicted this month, at least. The corporation that owns these apts cut me some slack. I had till 5pm today. I got the last $50 at 6 after, but the office stayed open for me. Still good people out there. There's still hope.
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:56 PM   #322
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Energy.

Look what North Dakota and western Pennsylvania are doing in this "jobless" recovery. Dangerous but good paying jobs in coal, refineries, pipelines, natural gas and offshore drilling. Not to mention trucking, building and servicing equipment and local jobs created in a boom. And the middle class benefits from lower energy costs.

President Solyndra sees things differently however.
And polluting all the groundwater at the same time.
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:25 PM   #323
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and we continue to get...

e-mail I got from the WH

"$40 is big money for us"

Yesterday, we asked you to tell us what losing $40 per paycheck would mean to you and your family if the House doesn’t pass the bipartisan payroll tax cut compromise by the end of this year.

The response was truly overwhelming. Thousands of Americans have responded and we wanted to make sure you saw some of the responses that have poured in from across the country.

If you haven't already, tell us what $40 means for you and your family, and see what it means for other Americans.


Stories submitted on WhiteHouse.gov

I can buy lunch from the cafeteria for almost a whole month for my twins, I can buy food, or pay for gas. I can save it for my daughter’s prescriptions deductibles. To some people $40 is nothing, but $40 is big money for us.
L.A., Hamden, Connecticut

$40.00 a paycheck will allow me to continue to pay co-pays to doctors for necessary medical treatments needed to control debilitating disease.
J.R., Arlington, Texas

Our cable internet bill is $49 per month. If we lose this payroll tax cut then we will have to give up either or internet access or possibly our 'Friday Family Pizza' night. Either way, we will lose something that brings us together as a family.
K.Z., Frederick, Maryland

After everything that comes out, including my mortgage my take home pay is $150.00 every two weeks. So minus forty would be $110.00. I can barely get by now, that forty bucks is my gas for my car to get to work. Taking forty away from my pay would, just about put me under.
R.T., Charleston, West Virginia

$40 less a paycheck means I will have to pick between my insulin and the water bill. It means never being able to see my doctor - even though I have insurance.
B.T., Roswell, New Mexico

90 days of prescription drugs
P.B., Milledgeville, Georgia

$40 a paycheck for my family helps pay for insulin, syringes, and blood sugar testing strips for my daughter, who was diagnosed with type I diabetes 5 years ago.
N.F., Midwest City, Oklahoma

The $40 I would lose is money I send to help my brother. He has had a myriad of health problems over the past two years and has only been able to work intermittently. He was recently diagnosed with inoperable cancer and has no health insurance. Without what some say isn't a lot of money, my brother wouldn't have food in his refrigerator.
S.K., Somerville, Massachusetts

Normally any extra money I have. I give to the needy. Salvation Army is my favorite charity. So I won’t be giving to charities or buying anything for anyone.
P.C., Lakeville, Minnesota

More here

What #40dollars Means to Americans | The White House
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:08 PM   #324
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^ But surely these lazy good for nothings could easily set up a business, say, for example, a hedge fund or an investment bank, and cream millions off the taxpayer in the best entrepreneurial American way?

I don't know what these freeloading ne'er do wells are complaining about, quite frankly.

If they hate the American system so much that they have to take to the internet with their whining little complaints, why don't they emigrate to North Korea?
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:10 PM   #325
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I have to admit I'm a little stressed about losing that $40 per paycheck as well.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:39 PM   #326
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Interesting, if depressing, stat from the Atlantic:


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It's also not just a burden on young people. The New York Fed's study found that only about a third of all student debt belongs to Americans under 30. Another third belongs to adults between the ages of 30 and 39. And according to one recent study, adults between the ages 35 and 49 are the fastest growing category of borrowers. Part of the reason may be that the tough job market has forced older workers back to school in order to learn new skills. But it's not clear that investment is paying off.

Americans, young and old, are turning to education in an economy that values technical skills, and has little use for a high school degree. And now they're stumbling under the weight of the debt they've incurred. It would be easy to chalk this up to the bad economy--and clearly that's playing a role--but there may be a deeper, harder-to-remedy problem at play. Simply put: Too many students don't graduate...less than 60% of US undergraduates seeking a bachelor's degree graduate within six years. Just 30% of those seeking an associate's degree finish within three years. It's an abysmal record, and it may go a long way to explaining the trouble borrowers are having paying back their loans. A few months back, the Wall Street Journal profiled a hedge fund that specializes in packaging student loans into securities for investors. The firm had found that whether a student graduated was one of the two most important predictors of if they would eventually pay back their loans. The second? Whether they graduated on time.
The low graduation rate is presumably also relevant to another stat I saw recently, which was that students at for-profit colleges, though only about 9% of all college students, account for 44% of all student loan defaults. For-profit colleges, like community colleges, disproportionately enroll poor students seeking associate's degrees, most of whom never finish.
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Old 03-13-2012, 12:24 AM   #327
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For-profit colleges are basically massive scams: they sign people up who almost uniformly don't graduate, and their degrees are not respected in many fields of employment anyway.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:14 PM   #328
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The American Association of Community Colleges just released a report surveying the unenviable state of community college students (at 44% of all US college students, a much larger group than their 4-year public, private, or for-profit counterparts):
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Fewer than half (46%) of students who enter community colleges with the goal of earning a degree or certificate have attained that goal, transferred to a baccalaureate institution, or are still enrolled 6 years later. The rates, unfortunately, are lower for Hispanic, Black, Native American, and low-income students.
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Almost a third (30%) of entering students do not attend orientation; most avoid online orientation; about 90% indicate that academic planning and advising is important to them, yet less than a third of entering students report that a college advisor helped them set academic goals and create a plan for achieving them; and although a large majority of entering students are underprepared for college-level work, 76% never use tutoring services. Well into the first term, many students have almost no idea of how well or poorly they are doing academically and report a general sense of bewilderment with registration processes.
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Developmental (remedial) education is all too often a burial ground for student aspirations. Getting up to speed in math and reading for some students can take 3 or more years...Among high school graduates, only 24% of those intending to go to college meet all four ACT benchmarks of college readiness in English, mathematics, reading, and science.
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Too many senior college and university leaders, faculty, department chairs, and deans are ambivalent about community colleges, understanding them not as having different missions but as somehow inferior because of their open-door admissions. Community college transfer students often have to fight to have their credits recognized at baccalaureate institutions, and universities often are reluctant to share data about transfer students and their performance. This ambivalence complicates the effort to improve articulation between the two sectors and lends credence to calls for more comprehensive policy solutions at the state level.
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[S]tudents’ plans prior to college entry indicate very little understanding of employment possibilities in high-demand, high-wage fields. The disparities in employment plans versus employment demand are striking:

The report lays out seven steps to improvement, with emphases on expanded student advising/mentoring and coordination between colleges and high schools to increase college readiness.

When the Obama Administration announced plans to overhaul and expand the community college system a couple years back, I said here at the time that while I was in principle strongly supportive, there absolutely had to be thorough study undertaken first of why these schools' graduation rates are so low, so that we're not just throwing money at a problem whose dimensions we don't understand. The finding of serious systemic weaknesses in advising and in secondary-tertiary coordination fits closely what I've observed in our transfer students (and indeed in many of our students, period). While the picture this report paints is pretty bleak, it's at least encouraging to see solid groundwork being done.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:30 PM   #329
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i'd be very interested to know why community college students don't finish their degree. i've never attended one but i do know the biggest one in memphis looks nice enough, but you can't even get federal funding for it because too many students defaulted on their loans. that alone could make or break it for a lot of students. it can't be that expensive to attend (as compared to a university, i mean - even a public one) but if you've got to foot the bill yourself or rely on private loans which you might not qualify for, one semester you could be fine. the next? you could lose your job or circumstances could change and suddenly you can't attend school anymore.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:34 PM   #330
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Some of those figures are not surprising, considering many community colleges in the US are High School 2.0 / holding tanks for people who have no business going to college and should have been presented many vocational training options in high school.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:45 PM   #331
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While finishing up my senior year of high school, I've been taking a few courses at my local community college. I can completely understand why most don't finish their degrees. As soon as I graduate high school, I'll be transferring to a university. You couldn't pay me enough to stay at this school.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:19 PM   #332
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i'd be very interested to know why community college students don't finish their degree.
I think a big portion of community college students are there for the wrong reasons, ie thinking that's just the next step.

Another big portion go in with the mentality that it's just a stepping stone to get into a university(not sure if the article accounted for this portion, reading this on my phone).

Don't even get me started about for-profit schools, I used to work for one, they are a perfect example of how some for-profit business models are completely wrong for certain goals.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:26 PM   #333
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good points, bvs. i tried reading the article, but i'm not gonna lie, it's way too long (huge pdf) so i just read what yolland summarised here.

and i agree about for-profit schools. unless we're talking 8+ years of university debt, there's no reason a person should be shouldered with enough student loans to buy a house. but hey, go go capitalism!
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:30 PM   #334
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Some of those figures are not surprising, considering many community colleges in the US are High School 2.0 / holding tanks for people who have no business going to college and should have been presented many vocational training options in high school.
Community colleges ARE vocational schools; those are exactly the kinds of curriculums most of their students are working towards associate's degrees or tech certificates in. The days when you could take a shop or business track in high school and graduate well-placed to secure a steady job adequate to support a family are long-gone. Some municipalities, most notably NYC, are experimenting with retooled vocational high schools tailored towards the contemporary job market, and in fact those projects are working towards a kind of combined high school-community college model which takes 5-6 years minimum to complete. These schools are, of course, still bound by standards-based education reform requirements just like all other US high schools.
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i'd be very interested to know why community college students don't finish their degree.
Inadequate advising and mentoring (both career and academic), inadequate highschool preparation, and inability to pay for the full course of study are the main reasons, according to the report.

There will always be a higher dropout rate compared to 4-years, simply because a higher proportion of these students enroll without clear goals (again, whether career or academic) and are therefore more likely to wind up concluding "Eh this isn't for me" and leaving. But at the same time it should be noted that, given the weakness of these schools' advising and mentoring systems as noted in the report, many of those students would likely have fared better given better advising. The way things are now, the students who get the best advising, direction and mentoring lavished on them are those at elite private colleges (who least need it), while those who get the least are those from the most disadvantaged backgrounds. It doesn't help that the entire teaching faculty at most of these schools is composed solely of adjuncts who are being paid per credit hour, so that all departmental development (curriculum, internships, interdisciplinary ventures, advising etc.) is left up to administrators, who are typically running several departments at once, so no one has a longterm stake in the programs. Add to all that poorly prepared students (I'm at a public university, and believe me it's depressing how many of our freshmen can't write a coherently structured paragraph, can't summarize the argument of a simply worded article they've just read, etc)...honestly it's probably kind of impressive that as many of these students manage to complete their degrees as do.
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Old 05-01-2012, 12:38 PM   #335
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While finishing up my senior year of high school, I've been taking a few courses at my local community college. I can completely understand why most don't finish their degrees. As soon as I graduate high school, I'll be transferring to a university. You couldn't pay me enough to stay at this school.
I took courses at a private university/college an at two community colleges. During my freshman year I took some classes at the uni and some at the community college (pre-requisite courses that everyone has to have) to save money. It depends on the college and the class. I've had community college professors/courses that I absolutely loved way more than the private college counterparts, and I've had community college professors that honestly shouldn't have ever been allowed to teach. It's the same with the private college. My psychology courses in the private school were a lot more in depth and interesting, while my sociology/human resource type classes were a complete joke.

Then I moved across the country and went to a community college that recently upgraded to being a regular college. Every single one of those professors was absolutely horrible. I promptly dropped out. The local universities/private schools do not have the major I want to study in so I haven't gone back yet. I do intend to, when the time and the school are both right.

The major problems with colleges are having inadequate counseling departments, professors that should have retired years ago, classes that work against rather than with the student, and a lack of proper resources. For example, not providing the students with the materials needed for classes on campus, regardless of if the student has to pay for them or not (this was true for the interior design class I took). I had a lot of issues with college and I could go on and on about it. The worst thing I noticed about my private college was that there were a ton of students that were... idiots. They got straight As at their private high schools and did really well and were just going to college because it was expected of them. They were mostly spoiled brats. Many of them weren't even smart, they just knew how to work with the system to get good grades. It didn't really motivate me to compete academically because I just felt so above them. I know that's a terrible thing to say, but it's true. I was self sufficient by that age (living on my own) and paying for college myself and here were these kids that only got there because of handouts, not talent or hard work. They viewed college as an extension of high school, just "the next thing to do" and not as an opportunity to actually learn.

Too many people are going to college.
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:37 PM   #336
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professors that should have retired years ago
my god yes. in my years of going to college (i initially went right out of high school for three semesters on a full academic scholarship, then dropped out, and am finally going back to finish my degree) i've encountered so many. fuck tenure. it's ridiculous that someone can shoehorn themselves into a sweet position and be untouchable because as the years progress they've been there for 20 years, 25 years, etc. i don't deny that there are older professors out there who still have the passion to teach and do it well, i've had some of those too. but there's many whose passion died out years ago and they only seem to be in it for the money and prestige. and yet because they no longer give a damn about actually teaching, every student they have suffers. they make no effort to learn new teaching methods and are stuck in the 60s. then when over half the class fails every semester, it must just be that the students are brain-dead, it couldn't possibly be that the professor just doesn't make the effort.

it's a big reason as to why i prefer to take classes online if at all possible, since at least at my college those professors obviously aren't the ones who'd waste time teaching something so beneath them.
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:58 PM   #337
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As a generalization, the system is not in any way set up to either instill or reward a "passion to teach," for either adjunct or tenured faculty. For the former, the emphasis is on teaching the largest number of students per semester for the least amount of money; for the latter, it's on how much you publish. Most graduate programs offer no training whatsoever in how to teach. If you want a truly student-focused environment then your best bet is a small, private undergrad-only humanities college.
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Old 05-01-2012, 07:38 PM   #338
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My buddy went to a vocational school in high school and then got his certificate at a community college. They seemed to complement one another pretty well, from what he told me. He has a poor-paying job now, though, as his intended job in the union dried up, as we graduated high school right after the economy collapsed.
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Old 05-03-2012, 11:47 PM   #339
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While finishing up my senior year of high school, I've been taking a few courses at my local community college. I can completely understand why most don't finish their degrees. As soon as I graduate high school, I'll be transferring to a university. You couldn't pay me enough to stay at this school.
Do the people suck or what?
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:52 AM   #340
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Almost every teacher I've had has been great. But the administrative people turn the simplest things into brain surgery.
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