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Old 05-09-2008, 02:43 PM   #16
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It's a dictatorship. They don't care one iota about their own people. They haven't since they've taken over the country.
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Old 05-10-2008, 01:06 AM   #17
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Originally posted by Vincent Vega
It's a dictatorship. They don't care one iota about their own people. They haven't since they've taken over the country.
Yeah, that's true... but I think,. hope - they've just signed their own death warrant of power.
This is different -and the world won't stand for it.
Wait - there's Darfur..
nevermind -
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Old 05-10-2008, 02:36 PM   #18
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You know how when somebody doesn't feed their kid or take care of them the welfare comes and takes them away? Can we take these people away from their gov't?
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Old 05-10-2008, 02:59 PM   #19
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You know how when somebody doesn't feed their kid or take care of them the welfare comes and takes them away? Can we take these people away from their gov't?
Their people are not in our jurisdiction so i guess that would be abduction on a grand scale.
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Old 05-10-2008, 08:47 PM   #20
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I was watching a reporter this morning on CNN having to sneak out of the hotel, for fear of being followed. The military finally caught up with him and he convinced them that he should just leave.
He also said that the refugees he met in a camp from the hardest hit area, the delta, clammed up and wouldn't talk to him when he started talking about what the government of Myanmar was doing to help them.
They said that camp would be closed due to no food and they were nearly out of water. The government said they could go back where they came from.
Yeah, there was so much there, that's why they left.
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Old 05-10-2008, 09:06 PM   #21
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Is It Time to Invade Burma?



http://www.time.com/time/world/artic...0.html?cnn=yes
I personally really like the title of this article. And I think the following quote is a "Yes" to this question right?


Quote:
Originally posted by Butterscotch
You know how when somebody doesn't feed their kid or take care of them the welfare comes and takes them away? Can we take these people away from their gov't?
It's amazing that some western people can be so easily fooled. And they have already forgot the pain even their Iraq wounds are still bleeding.

Tell me, when can I see CNN report for "the mass destruction weapon found in Burma"? Don't have to wait too long, I guess.
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Old 05-10-2008, 09:52 PM   #22
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Tell me, when can I see CNN report for "the mass destruction weapon found in Burma"? Don't have to wait too long, I guess.

Burma's military regime IS! the weapon of mass destruction.
Does that count?
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Old 05-10-2008, 10:20 PM   #23
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They also remind me of my aunt whose house is so messy she'd rather leave her stuff broken than to have anyone come in to fix it and see what all is wrong inside. Guess they have a lot to hide too!

Whatever happened to that "Walk On" lady can't she help somehow?
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Old 05-11-2008, 12:11 AM   #24
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Originally posted by Butterscotch
They also remind me of my aunt whose house is so messy she'd rather leave her stuff broken than to have anyone come in to fix it and see what all is wrong inside. Guess they have a lot to hide too!

Whatever happened to that "Walk On" lady can't she help somehow?
You also remind me of the old lady that living in the neighbourhood of my old place. When she saw young boys and girls walking on the street hand in hand, or share a kiss in the nearby bus stop while waiting, she would just stand up and try to fix their behaviour by standing in the middle of the two.

Get a life, I say!
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Old 05-11-2008, 02:53 PM   #25
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Originally posted by Butterscotch

Whatever happened to that "Walk On" lady can't she help somehow?
Aung San Suu Kyi. She's currently on house arrest.
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Old 05-11-2008, 03:01 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally posted by butter7
It's amazing that some western people can be so easily fooled. And they have already forgot the pain even their Iraq wounds are still bleeding.

Tell me, when can I see CNN report for "the mass destruction weapon found in Burma"? Don't have to wait too long, I guess.
Iraq was the first thing that came to my mind too. I just wasn't in the mood to pick a fight.

Nonetheless, while I'm a bit aghast at how flippantly you're taking this crisis, I think it does highlight a long-running dilemma within Western political philosophy; that is, there's little principle or consistency left in it. It is still far preferable to dictatorship, mind you, but it is an issue that should be addressed philosophically.

When is it okay to "liberate" one nation (Burma/Myanmar) and not okay to liberate another (Iraq)? Is the difference solely based on which political ideology issues the calls for liberation? Or is it 20/20 hindsight; that is, if we did invade Myanmar, would the left then decry it as another callous display of American cultural imperialism, and, if we don't, would we then decry it as how America is too selfish and only cares about itself?

Of course, if China would responsibly manage its sphere of influence, rather than going on its destructive rampage towards modernization and propping up morally reprehensible nations like North Korea and Myanmar, then the West wouldn't ever have to feel the need to get involved.
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Old 05-11-2008, 06:12 PM   #27
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Maybe the west should stop interfering imo. If they need our help thats fine but let them ask for it.

If anyone needed liberation its the west. We dont live in a free and fair society and when it comes to a vote the options are few on the ground.
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Old 05-11-2008, 06:27 PM   #28
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Originally posted by vaz02
Maybe the west should stop interfering imo. If they need our help thats fine but let them ask for it.

If anyone needed liberation its the west. We dont live in a free and fair society and when it comes to a vote the options are few on the ground.
So what's your opinion on Darfur then?
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Old 05-11-2008, 06:41 PM   #29
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So what's your opinion on Darfur then?
Its an issue for the African community really, they wanted independence so they could govern themselves and the responsibilities that follow. If the west wade in with sharpend steel it would be seen by many African leaders as colonization, when the region is stable and they need assistance in aid then thats when we can help.
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Old 05-11-2008, 09:30 PM   #30
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Quote:
The Dangers of the Deltas

By ANDREW C. REVKIN
New York Times, May 11


Deltas are disaster zones in waiting. From the Mekong to the Mississippi, the rich soils and strategic positions of river mouths have long lured farmers, fishers and traders. But the same geography also guarantees they will be periodically inundated.

A case in point was Cyclone Nargis last weekend. As it roared over the sprawling, crowded delta of the Irrawaddy River in Myanmar, the sea surged up to seven miles inland like a slow-motion tsunami, as up to two feet of rain fell. Tens of thousands of people died. Still, many experts say it is not nature that largely determines the amount of death and destruction in such circumstances, but investment, governance and policy (or the lack of it). Governments that do not prepare adequately—either through political inertia and underinvestment as in New Orleans, or willful disregard, as critics of the Myanmar junta charge—will continue to see tragic losses.

There is a long list of reasons for countries with low-lying population centers, particularly around rivers, to do more to gird for the worst. Deltas are evanescent landscapes, formed and occasionally violently rearranged by water.
They are implicitly lowlands, built of sediment settling where rivers meet the sea. Most are sinking naturally, as recently deposited silt compresses over time. In many cases, the subsidence is accelerated by human activities, including the extraction of groundwater and construction of upriver dams, levees and channels, which cut off the renewing flow of silt. In addition, destruction of coastal vegetation leaves exposed soil open to erosion.

Vulnerability will keep rising as populations in poor countries crest in the next few decades, with much of the increase crowding into coastal cities. Simultaneously, such regions face a faster retreat of coastlines from the rise in sea levels, as climate and oceans warm under the influence of accumulating greenhouse gases, scientists warn. But human vulnerability can be reduced, as shown in Bangladesh. Though hammered regularly by cyclone-driven floods, it has seen declining death counts since it began investing in warning systems, shelters, coastal housing standards and evacuation plans. Cyclones in its deltas killed something like half a million people in 1970, and 140,000 in 1991. Last November, aid organizations estimate, the toll from Cyclone Sidr was about 4000; in that case, more than two million people had taken shelter when the storm struck.

Cyclone Nargis and its aftermath, on the other hand, provide a vivid study in how poverty and insufficient government investment can turn a natural disaster into an outsize human tragedy, said Debarati Guha-Sapir, the director of the World Health Organization’s Collaborating Center for Research on Disaster Epidemiology, in Brussels. “The villages are in such levels of desperation—housing quality, nutritional status, roads, bridges, dams—that losses were more determined by their condition rather than the force of the cyclone,” she said.
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