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Old 11-08-2005, 06:25 PM   #1
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Bono Article In Time Magazine / Nov 7 Issue

i apologize if this has been posted before! It's a great article.

This Generation's Moon Shot
A rock star turned activist challenges the world to wipe out poverty and disease
By BONO

Nov. 7, 2005

I was a 9-year-old boy in Dublin when a man first walked on the moon. It wasn't just any man--it was an American. I thought I already knew something about America from Elvis, the movies and the hip gear sent home by Irish people who crossed the Atlantic. But now American meant something new. It meant having a sense of infinite possibility, doing the things everyone says can't be done. Even this freckle-faced Irish kid could see that America went to the moon not just because it was a scientific milestone--a career move for the human race--but because it was an adventure.

More than ever, we need to renew that sense of adventure and purpose. Never before has the West been so scrutinized. Our convictions and credibility are under attack. Who are we? What are our values? Do we have any at all?

We can't answer these questions by going back to the moon. But there is a goal out there worthy of our generation. It's earth-bound this time, but no less exhilarating. It is the defeat of humanity's oldest foe: disease.

Just a few years ago, this was Mission Impossible; today it is tantalizingly within our reach. It is no longer crazy to suggest that we can eliminate tuberculosis and malaria from the planet. It is no longer unthinkable to imagine a world without AIDS or extreme poverty. And this isn't hope talking, or faith. This is hard science pointing us toward a better, healthier world.

In the past year we learned that for the first time there's a vaccine that offers real, if partial, protection against malaria. No more death by mosquito bite is a goal that is within sight. Two new vaccines have been developed for rotavirus, the main cause of diarrheal disease. Today nearly a million people with HIV in poor countries are on lifesaving antiretroviral drugs--more than double the total just 18 months ago.

That's enough to get even a rock star out of bed in the morning.

The question now is whether politicians will prove themselves the equal of scientists. Biomedicine today is where high tech was in the 1990s--it's where the energy and excitement are. But scientists alone can't get lifesaving vaccines and treatments to the people who need them most--not without our help.

On that score, there is cause for optimism. From NGOs to CEOs, truckers to nurses, philanthropists to pharmaceutical companies and even Presidents and Prime Ministers, people are putting their talents, time and money to work in the fight against deadly diseases. Just check out Bill Gates.

Momentum is building, but disease is still way out in front. The numbers are so big that they can numb us into indifference: 5,000 people dying every day from tuberculosis, 1 million dying every year from malaria. Behind each of these statistics is someone's daughter, someone's son, a mother, a father, a sister, a brother.

We cannot save every life. But the ones we can, we must. It is--or it ought to be--unacceptable that an accident of longitude and latitude determines whether a child lives or dies. In America and in Europe we have dealt with polio, malaria and TB with the ruthless efficiency they deserve. Beyond our own borders, we have offered excuses instead of solutions. We need to stop this two-steps-forward, one-step-back tango that we have been dancing for years and start marching.

The good news is that a lot of people have their boots on.

This year millions of people gathered to persuade world leaders to invest more in fighting poverty and disease in Africa. In July they listened: the Group of Eight pledged an additional $50 billion annually to poor countries, half of it for Africa. The G-8 also agreed to write off $56 billion in old multilateral debt for 38 of the world's poorest countries. And they promised to get AIDS drugs not just to everyone who can afford them but to everyone who needs them--a great promise, if they keep it.

We must keep the pressure on our governments if we want them to follow through. As voters and taxpayers, we must give our leaders permission to invest just a fraction of our taxes in $5 mosquito nets and drug treatments that cost pennies apiece. Right now in Washington, Congress is deciding whether to provide $3.6 billion in global AIDS funding, including $600 million for the global health fund, thanks to Democrat Dick Durbin and Republican Rick Santorum. If this money is not approved, people across Africa will have to be taken off lifesaving medications. How mad is that?

Beating AIDS and extreme, stupid poverty, this is our moon shot. This is our civil rights struggle, our anti-apartheid movement. This is what the history books will remember our generation for--or blame us for, if we fail.
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Old 11-08-2005, 06:36 PM   #2
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Wow. I think he hit one out of the park. I'll see him next week in his life as a rock star. But I won't forget the humanitarian that's there, too. How inspiring.
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Old 11-08-2005, 07:25 PM   #3
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That's a really great article! This man is just talented in so many ways!
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Old 11-08-2005, 07:55 PM   #4
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Actually, I would encourage evryone to buy this issue of Time magazine.

The focus of the majority of the mag is dedicated to an in depth look at the poor state of global health and has some VERY GOOD charts and graphs which helps to understand the scope of this tragedy better.

So don't just look at the EXCELLENT article by Bono - pick up this mag to learn more about the issue which Bono so dearly cares about.
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Old 11-08-2005, 08:12 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jamila
Actually, I would encourage evryone to buy this issue of Time magazine.

The focus of the majority of the mag is dedicated to an in depth look at the poor state of global health and has some VERY GOOD charts and graphs which helps to understand the scope of this tragedy better.

So don't just look at the EXCELLENT article by Bono - pick up this mag to learn more about the issue which Bono so dearly cares about.
great suggestion
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Old 11-08-2005, 09:02 PM   #6
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actually going to the moon (apart from the cold war competition angle) was a fundamentally pointless activity. it also created the illusion of limitless possibility when in fact possibility is very limited indeed. apart from those caveats, more power to bono i guess.
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Old 11-08-2005, 09:17 PM   #7
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He's a great salesman. Sometimes I think that's a weakness of his, he kinda concentrates too much on the clever/buzzy pitch side of things (but I guess that also comes from me and us seeing so much of it compared to the average Joe), but mostly, it's the strength of his sales ability that is getting this as far as it has gone.
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Old 11-08-2005, 09:23 PM   #8
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^that...and the fact that I believe he honestly cares.
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Old 11-08-2005, 09:31 PM   #9
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Bono would be a great politician. He's a very emotive writer, and definitely good with talking points.
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Old 11-08-2005, 11:52 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dismantled
^that...and the fact that I believe he honestly cares.
i believe that is the essence of what has made people care about what Bono cares about. he is sincere, and he sincerely cares about the issues and has actively been involved in making a difference for a long time now.
I think he's always cared, ever since his trip with Ali to Ethiopia back in the 80's. I think that what he felt back then just laid dormant for a long time, until the jubilee 2000 reminded him again of how that had affected him, and he pulled his feelings and desires into action. so, yeah, it's not like his whole life has been dedicated to this cause, because in the 90's him and the band did have "a taste of the pizza" as he says in the rolling stone interview.
if he hadn't shown during all the recent years that he acts upon what he "preaches" he would just be another one of those celebrity with a cause, that eventually you don't hear much more about. I think we will be hearing about Bono, and the One campaign, and Data, and africa, and aids, for many many years to come. And I hope we'll be doing more than just going to his concerts and just listening.
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Old 11-09-2005, 09:01 AM   #11
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Great Article
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Old 11-09-2005, 10:45 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by VertigoGal
Bono would be a great politician.
He's an amazingly eloquent and effective activist. Some activists should stay activists. I'm glad he's not a politician. I'm glad U2 will produce more records.

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Old 11-09-2005, 09:41 PM   #13
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^oh yeah, definitely. I would hate it if Bono went into politics.

I was just complimenting him on his use of talking points.
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