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Old 11-28-2001, 07:56 PM   #1
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what do american's think of canada?

it seems to be a general bone of contention amongst us canadians, that is when our southern neighbours know very little of canadians.
i was sitting with some friends at a bar in ottawa this afternoon and everybody was riding on the general U.S. populous for not being sufficiently knowledgeable of there largest trade partner. but my argument is that american's shouldn't know much of us because they aren't exposed to all that much. i've seen numerous indiscretions on the part of american mass media regarding canada-i'm talking glaring mistakes in their reporting.
so i was wondering what intelligent american's, such as the ones that we find here, think of canada?

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Old 11-28-2001, 08:04 PM   #2
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The former governor of Alabama hunts frequently in British Columbia.
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Old 11-28-2001, 08:09 PM   #3
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I know you asked for opinions from INTELLIGENT Americans, but I'll post anyway. Canada Dry is a good ginger ale.

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Old 11-28-2001, 08:22 PM   #4
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Originally posted by U2Bama:
The former governor of Alabama hunts Canadians frequently in British Columbia.


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Old 11-28-2001, 08:55 PM   #5
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you tell us, what about this mysterious Canadian species are Americans (oops, sorry, Uninted Staters) missing?

I don't think there is as great a difference as some Canadians like to insist
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Old 11-28-2001, 10:01 PM   #6
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"on the general U.S. populous for not being sufficiently knowledgeable of there largest trade partner."

-Let's start here, I know a lot of Americans who use the correct form "their" when writing things. As a Minnesotan I feel the pain of a Canadian when Americans rip on Canadian accents, as we pretty much have them too. But any time we do rip on you, it's out of love...so don't feel bad. But if you feel we are ignorant to your crazy Canadian customs, then don't sit there at a bar in ottawa whining about it. Tell us something good about Canadians.

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Old 11-28-2001, 10:07 PM   #7
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Canada?

That's north of here right?

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Old 11-28-2001, 10:14 PM   #8
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I've never met a Canadian who after talking to them, I thought to myself, "That was a weird motherfucker!"



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Old 11-28-2001, 10:24 PM   #9
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I have lots of Canadian friends, and since I live in Minnesota, I get mistaken for one often enough as well. The thing is...most Americans don't think about Canada as much as Canada seems to think about us. Let me illustrate.

I was recently travelling in Europe. Whenever I met other native English speakers (ie. British, Australian, etc.) and they heard my North American accent, they ALWAYS asked if I was from Canada. The reason? They've learned in their travels that if you accidentally ask a Canadian if they're American they get very offended and state proudly that they are CANADIAN!...while if you mistakenly ask an American if they're Canadian they will most likely shrug, say "no, I'm from the States" and the conversation moves on. My point? It's more or less a non-issue for Americans. Canadians have an inferiority complex. But that's ok. We love you anyways.

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p.s. Before you flame me for this, believe me...I've had this conversation countless times with friends from coast to coast...and I mean that in terms of Vancouver to Halifax.
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Old 11-28-2001, 11:01 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lilly:
"on the general U.S. populous for not being sufficiently knowledgeable of there largest trade partner."

-Let's start here, I know a lot of Americans who use the correct form "their" when writing things. As a Minnesotan I feel the pain of a Canadian when Americans rip on Canadian accents, as we pretty much have them too. But any time we do rip on you, it's out of love...so don't feel bad. But if you feel we are ignorant to your crazy Canadian customs, then don't sit there at a bar in ottawa whining about it. Tell us something good about Canadians.

i think you just single handedly lowered my respect for american's. at what point was i 'whining'? i asked a question. sorry about the grammar as well, i tend to make some mistakes ie no caps.

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Old 11-28-2001, 11:07 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by The Wanderer:
you tell us, what about this mysterious Canadian species are Americans (oops, sorry, Uninted Staters) missing?

I don't think there is as great a difference as some Canadians like to insist



How insightful...
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Old 11-28-2001, 11:13 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by sulawesigirl4:
The thing is...most Americans don't think about Canada as much as Canada seems to think about us. But that's ok.

I think that's EXACTLY the point of my fellow Ottawer, n'est-ce pas?

You guys don't think about anyone other than yourselves (and hence, don't know much about us!)...(sorry, I don't mean this in a rude way - I love Americans - but I'm just saying you don't get educated much about countries beyond your own borders...so not your fault!)
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Old 11-28-2001, 11:21 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by sulawesigirl4:
I have lots of Canadian friends, and since I live in Minnesota, I get mistaken for one often enough as well. The thing is...most Americans don't think about Canada as much as Canada seems to think about us. Let me illustrate.

I was recently travelling in Europe. Whenever I met other native English speakers (ie. British, Australian, etc.) and they heard my North American accent, they ALWAYS asked if I was from Canada. The reason? They've learned in their travels that if you accidentally ask a Canadian if they're American they get very offended and state proudly that they are CANADIAN!...while if you mistakenly ask an American if they're Canadian they will most likely shrug, say "no, I'm from the States" and the conversation moves on. My point? It's more or less a non-issue for Americans. Canadians have an inferiority complex. But that's ok. We love you anyways.

-sula

p.s. Before you flame me for this, believe me...I've had this conversation countless times with friends from coast to coast...and I mean that in terms of Vancouver to Halifax.
why would i flame you for that sula?
i apologize if i'm wrong but i think you are mistakenly assuming that the hostility that you have heard of in some canadian's is present in me, well i am glad to report it is not. i think the somewhat hasty responses that are in this thread is also an indication many american's assume canadian's to be hostile regarding this issue. yes i love my country and i would not want to live any where else but i have travelled across the states and it is also a great country with great people.
there is a reason for the fact that many canadian's are apprehensive regarding canadian-american relations. it is part of a canadian discourse that we are 'smothered', for lack of a better term, by american culture and values. someone else mentioned that there is not much of a difference and i would agree there isn't. the battle against american culture has been going on for ages now in canada, back to the days when urban areas close to the border would be 'corrupted' with american broadcast signals. the fact of the matter is our culture was at one time different and we were very proud of it. we were *different*. however, as always happens with as much free trade as we have between ourselves, canadian culture eventually eroded. much of the same effect is now playing itself out throughout quebecois society, provincialists there however enjoy one significant advantage: a language barrier, not an overly significant one but a barrier regardless.
america has recieved some deal of criticism for it's patriotism, especially in the last few months, however i for one admire it for the most part. here in canada our main source of pride is beer commercials-a sad day it is.
it is still my opinion that a large portion of your population don't know canada nearly as well as they should-but once again it is not neccessarily their fault as canada and the rest of the world for that matter is under represented in your media as well as my own.

that is certainly the longest message i've ever typed.
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but everybody wanna live
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you feelin' me, right?
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[This message has been edited by kobayashi (edited 11-28-2001).]

[This message has been edited by kobayashi (edited 11-28-2001).]
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Old 11-28-2001, 11:47 PM   #14
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seriously, I think Canadian society is much more liberal and conscientious of things like the environment and poverty, education and healthcare

now it has been brought to my attention outside this thread, that I should take into consideration the aspect of French Canada -- well, this is indeed one of the most unique cultures in the world, it's nothing short of astonishing that Quebec has survived and thrived with its culture intact in an area of the world that is dominated by an english-speaking government, media, public, culture, etc

it's no wonder why French Canadians in particular, are so protective of their culture and heritage

I will say of my own experiences, I've known and met many international students, but not many Canadians, I'm told Canadians (especially French Canadians) have a greater sense of their European heritage and culture, but I really can't confirm that... so I honestly don't know what the differences are between Americans and Canadians, except the ones I stated earlier, basing that on what I've read in the media

but still think the error that many Canadians make is in trying to compare their culture to that of Americans, and in doing so, falsely attempt to create one uniform "american culture"

the truth is American culture is not some static entity, so I think you almost have to gather up sub-divisions within the States and compare them on an idividual basis to English-speaking Canadians, and then do the same with French-speaking Canadians, now I forgot about the bilingual Canadians so I skipped most of the country, I realize, but I would like to know this: are there as great of differences between French Canadians and the rest of Canada as there are between United States, in your mind? do all Canadians have a unified identity that is vastly different than the "unified American identity?"

p.s., sorry julie, I was out of line before, that was a dumb thing to say about France and Quebec... sorry


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Old 11-29-2001, 12:21 AM   #15
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I think everyone knows what we're talking about when we refer to American culture....People aren't so ignorant that they don't realize that there does exist *distinct societies* (oh, that nasty expression for Canadians! ) within the U.S.

As for European....that's probably not right....French-Canadian/Quebecois have forged so much of their own identity that they don't need to look to France to help shape their identity. (I just said that with respect to myself...I feel that, though...and also, the fact that I'm half British explains why I mentionned European culture to you earlier)
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Old 11-29-2001, 12:56 AM   #16
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See this is very funny to read when talking about the differences of americans and canadians when canada. from provence to provence is very different from eachother. Quebec is the outcasts of canada. Many, and i mean many people in canada resent them. Then you have Ontario. They preety much run this country since they have the majority of population. Then you have Sask and Manitoba. Usually forgotten and brushed off. Manitoba is usually put in the same pile as Ontario. Then you you have NWT, Yukon ans Nunaviat. Either working camps where you can make over 100,000 a year, or Natives that still live in the artic. Then you have ALberta. The richest provence in the country. A real blue colar place to live. Never get heard by the men and women in Ottawa. Resents eastern canada. B.C., well the weed capitol of the world. Best marijuana in the world. 6 billion a year tax free industry. Also never a high priority in Ottawa.

Oh did i forget the maritimes. Ya that because everyone else does. Working class. Not rich. forgetable. according to polititions.

That is a over view of canada. But remeber thats from a hatefull albertan!

We are just another US state and if any canadian cant see that then they obviuoslly arnt looking at all. Our country is run by American companies. Much of the money we spend in canada goes right back to americans.
Alberta and the North are oil and diamonds rich. There are no Canadian companies mining these rich resourses. Its the biggest joke in Canada. We get robbed of BILLIONS AND BILLIONS every year.

If the US ever went to war and really was in a tight squeze for oil it could easily have the oil companies of america sell oil to the american gov;t at a lower cost. Pure robbery.

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Old 11-29-2001, 01:21 AM   #17
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Well actually, what do you mean by "American culture?" Please define it.

Regardless, I still think the entire premise of this question is irrelevant in this day and age. But I can honestly say that Americans tend to think very highly of Canadians, primarily because we see Canadians as the closest of any culture to our own... arrogant? of course, but it's also meant as a compliment... one thing I have always noticed is that Americans tend to embrace the similarities between the US and Canada, while Canadians search for the differences, which reveals both their pride and insecurities.

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Old 11-29-2001, 07:48 AM   #18
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Toronto is cool.
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Old 11-29-2001, 09:00 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by ladywithspinninghead:
You guys don't think about anyone other than yourselves (and hence, don't know much about us!)...(sorry, I don't mean this in a rude way - I love Americans - but I'm just saying you don't get educated much about countries beyond your own borders...so not your fault!)
Excuse me, but how would you know what we get educated on? Did you go to any schools here?

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Old 11-29-2001, 09:10 AM   #20
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