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Old 09-03-2007, 10:20 PM   #21
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i'm almost ashamed of the hot flash of anger that shot through my body when i saw that picture.

i wish i could be more clearheaded when it comes to that man, but it's hard.
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Old 09-03-2007, 11:55 PM   #22
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I just saw "No End in Sight."

Not impressed by the photo op.
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Old 09-04-2007, 07:00 AM   #23
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^ looking forward to it, will probably try to see it this week
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Old 09-04-2007, 07:52 AM   #24
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The total lack of competence that is exposed is absolutely staggering.

Everyone should see it. Probably the most important film on Iraq to date. Unlike, say, a Michael Moore documentary, you really walk away feeling like everything you just saw and heard was the truth because of the credibility of the people telling their stories. It's not really a political film either--it's not about Republicans vs. Democrats. It's just simply high level people's accounts of what actually happened when the US invaded Iraq.
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Old 09-04-2007, 08:16 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally posted by Irvine511
i'm almost ashamed of the hot flash of anger that shot through my body when i saw that picture.

i wish i could be more clearheaded when it comes to that man, but it's hard.
Did you see Keith Oberman tonight? I find he does a good job of channeling my flashes of anger.

http://thenewshole.msnbc.msn.com/arc...04/344229.aspx
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Old 09-04-2007, 08:47 PM   #26
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Originally posted by joyfulgirl
The total lack of competence that is exposed is absolutely staggering.

Everyone should see it. Probably the most important film on Iraq to date.
Have you seen Iraq For Sale?
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Old 09-04-2007, 09:02 PM   #27
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Have you seen Iraq For Sale?
Not yet. It's in my Netflix queue. I think it's also airing on one of the cable stations but I keep missing it. I will definitely see it.
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Old 09-06-2007, 09:04 AM   #28
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Experts Doubt Drop In Violence in Iraq
Military Statistics Called Into Question

By Karen DeYoung
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, September 6, 2007; A16

The U.S. military's claim that violence has decreased sharply in Iraq in recent months has come under scrutiny from many experts within and outside the government, who contend that some of the underlying statistics are questionable and selectively ignore negative trends.

Reductions in violence form the centerpiece of the Bush administration's claim that its war strategy is working. In congressional testimony Monday, Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, is expected to cite a 75 percent decrease in sectarian attacks. According to senior U.S. military officials in Baghdad, overall attacks in Iraq were down to 960 a week in August, compared with 1,700 a week in June, and civilian casualties had fallen 17 percent between December 2006 and last month. Unofficial Iraqi figures show a similar decrease.

Others who have looked at the full range of U.S. government statistics on violence, however, accuse the military of cherry-picking positive indicators and caution that the numbers -- most of which are classified -- are often confusing and contradictory. "Let's just say that there are several different sources within the administration on violence, and those sources do not agree," Comptroller General David Walker told Congress on Tuesday in releasing a new Government Accountability Office report on Iraq.

Senior U.S. officers in Baghdad disputed the accuracy and conclusions of the largely negative GAO report, which they said had adopted a flawed counting methodology used by the CIA and the Defense Intelligence Agency. Many of those conclusions were also reflected in last month's pessimistic National Intelligence Estimate on Iraq.

The intelligence community has its own problems with military calculations. Intelligence analysts computing aggregate levels of violence against civilians for the NIE puzzled over how the military designated attacks as combat, sectarian or criminal, according to one senior intelligence official in Washington. "If a bullet went through the back of the head, it's sectarian," the official said. "If it went through the front, it's criminal."

"Depending on which numbers you pick," he said, "you get a different outcome." Analysts found "trend lines . . . going in different directions" compared with previous years, when numbers in different categories varied widely but trended in the same direction. "It began to look like spaghetti."

Among the most worrisome trends cited by the NIE was escalating warfare between rival Shiite militias in southern Iraq that has consumed the port city of Basra and resulted last month in the assassination of two southern provincial governors. According to a spokesman for the Baghdad headquarters of the Multi-National Force-Iraq (MNF-I), those attacks are not included in the military's statistics. "Given a lack of capability to accurately track Shiite-on-Shiite and Sunni-on-Sunni violence, except in certain instances," the spokesman said, "we do not track this data to any significant degree."

Attacks by U.S.-allied Sunni tribesmen -- recruited to battle Iraqis allied with al-Qaeda -- are also excluded from the U.S. military's calculation of violence levels.

The administration has not given up trying to demonstrate that Iraq is moving toward political reconciliation. Testifying with Petraeus next week, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan C. Crocker is expected to report that top Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish leaders agreed last month to work together on key legislation demanded by Congress. If all goes as U.S. officials hope, Crocker will also be able to point to a visit today to the Sunni stronghold of Anbar province by ministers in the Shiite-dominated government -- perhaps including Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, according to a senior U.S. official involved in Iraq policy. The ministers plan to hand Anbar's governor $70 million in new development funds, the official said.

But most of the administration's case will rest on security data, according to military, intelligence and diplomatic officials who would not speak on the record before the Petraeus-Crocker testimony. Several Republican and Democratic lawmakers who were offered military statistics during Baghdad visits in August said they had been convinced that Bush's new strategy, and the 162,000 troops carrying it out, has produced enough results to merit more time.

Challenges to how military and intelligence statistics are tallied and used have been a staple of the Iraq war. In its December 2006 report, the bipartisan Iraq Study Group identified "significant underreporting of violence," noting that "a murder of an Iraqi is not necessarily counted as an attack. If we cannot determine the sources of a sectarian attack, that assault does not make it into the data base." The report concluded that "good policy is difficult to make when information is systematically collected in a way that minimizes its discrepancy with policy goals."

Recent estimates by the media, outside groups and some government agencies have called the military's findings into question. The Associated Press last week counted 1,809 civilian deaths in August, making it the highest monthly total this year, with 27,564 civilians killed overall since the AP began collecting data in April 2005.

The GAO report found that "average number of daily attacks against civilians have remained unchanged from February to July 2007," a conclusion that the military said was skewed because it did not include dramatic, up-to-date information from August.

Juan R.I. Cole, a Middle East specialist at the University of Michigan who is critical of U.S. policy, said that most independent counts "do not agree with Pentagon estimates about drops in civilian deaths."

In a letter last week to the leadership of both parties, a group of influential academics and former Clinton administration officials called on Congress to examine "the exact nature and methodology that is being used to track the security situation in Iraq and specifically the assertions that sectarian violence is down."

The controversy centers as much on what is counted -- attacks on civilians vs. attacks on U.S. and Iraqi troops, numbers of attacks vs. numbers of casualties, sectarian vs. intra-sect battles, daily numbers vs. monthly averages -- as on the numbers themselves.

The military stopped releasing statistics on civilian deaths in late 2005, saying the news media were taking them out of context. In an e-mailed response to questions last weekend, an MNF-I spokesman said that while trends were favorable, "exact monthly figures cannot be provided" for attacks against civilians or other categories of violence in 2006 or 2007, either in Baghdad or for the country overall. "MNF-I makes every attempt to ensure it captures the most comprehensive, accurate, and valid data on civilian and sectarian deaths," the spokesman wrote. "However, there is not one central place for data or information. . . . This means there can be variations when different organizations examine this information."

In a follow-up message yesterday, the spokesman said that the non-release policy had been changed this week but that the numbers were still being put "in the right context."

Attacks labeled "sectarian" are among the few statistics the military has consistently published in recent years, although the totals are regularly recalculated. The number of monthly "sectarian murders and incidents" in the last six months of 2006, listed in the Pentagon's quarterly Iraq report published in June, was substantially higher each month than in the Pentagon's March report. MNF-I said that "reports from un-reported/not-yet-reported past incidences as well as clarification/corrections on reports already received" are "likely to contribute to changes."

When Petraeus told an Australian newspaper last week that sectarian attacks had decreased 75 percent "since last year," the statistic was quickly e-mailed to U.S. journalists in a White House fact sheet. Asked for detail, MNF-I said that "last year" referred to December 2006, when attacks spiked to more than 1,600.

By March, however -- before U.S. troop strength was increased under Bush's strategy -- the number had dropped to 600, only slightly less than in the same month last year. That is about where it has remained in 2007, with what MNF-I said was a slight increase in April and May "but trending back down in June-July."

Petraeus's spokesman, Col. Steven A. Boylan, said he was certain that Petraeus had made a comparison with December in the interview with the Australian paper, which did not publish a direct Petraeus quote. No qualifier appeared in the White House fact sheet.

When a member of the National Intelligence Council visited Baghdad this summer to review a draft of the intelligence estimate on Iraq, Petraeus argued that its negative judgments did not reflect recent improvements. At least one new sentence was added to the final version, noting that "overall attack levels across Iraq have fallen during seven of the last nine weeks."

A senior military intelligence official in Baghdad deemed it "odd" that "marginal" security improvements were reflected in an estimate assessing the previous seven months and projecting the next six to 12 months. He attributed the change to a desire to provide Petraeus with ammunition for his congressional testimony.

The intelligence official in Washington, however, described the Baghdad consultation as standard in the NIE drafting process and said that the "new information" did not change the estimate's conclusions. The overall assessment was that the security situation in Iraq since January "was still getting worse," he said, "but not as fast.
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Old 09-07-2007, 09:14 AM   #29
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So glad to know we're "kicking ass", and that our President is so willing to verbalize it in such a manner.

WASHINGTON (CNN) — When President Bush made a surprise visit to Iraq last weekend, he made clear he was pleased with what he saw.

"The security situation is changing," Bush told reporters during the visit. "There's more work to be done. But reconciliation is taking place."

But according to the Sydney Morning Herald of Australia, the president gave a more-to-the-point assessment to Australia Deputy Prime Minister Mark Vaile.

"We're kicking ass," Bush said to Vaile Tuesday, according the Herald, after the deputy prime minister inquired about his trip to Iraq.

On Thursday, White House spokeswoman Dana Perino would not confirm or deny the reported comment.
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Old 09-07-2007, 12:11 PM   #30
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^ this government would never handpick information to suit their views and conclusions. Never, ever, they are honourable people. [end of sarcasm]


http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2007/0...ush-slips.html

More on the walking doofus in Australia who sadly wears the badge of leader of the free world, not my leader though.
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Old 09-07-2007, 04:27 PM   #31
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It seems six years after 911

that BinLaden is more lucid and has a better grasp on reality than President Bush

if this tape is legit - BinLaden seems to have better writers
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Old 09-13-2007, 09:23 AM   #32
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Key Iraqi Sunni tribal leader killed

September 13, 2007

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A key leader of an alliance of Iraqi Sunni Arab tribes that opposed al Qaeda was killed in a roadside bomb attack on Thursday, police and a tribal sheikh said.

Abdul Sattar Abu Risha was killed in the bomb blast near his home in Ramadi, provincial capital of the western province of Anbar. U.S. President George W. Bush had met Abu Risha during a visit to Iraq last week.

"The sheikh's car was totally destroyed by the explosion. Abu Risha was killed and two of his bodyguards were seriously wounded," Ramadi police officer Ahmed Mahmoud al-Alwani told Reuters.

Abu Risha set up an alliance of tribal sheikhs in Anbar to fight Sunni Islamist al Qaeda, an effort which has been held up by U.S. and Iraqi leaders as one of the biggest success stories in improving security in Iraq.

But the alliance had shown signs of splintering in recent months over dissatisfaction with Abu Risha's leadership and infighting between tribal leaders.

It was one of the first examples of working with local tribal sheikhs in Anbar, once the most dangerous area of Iraq for U.S. forces, to develop tribal police to secure their own communities.
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Old 09-17-2007, 12:39 PM   #33
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Iraqi government may ban Blackwater security group

By Dan Murphy
Christian Science Monitor, September 18, 2007


CAIRO - The Iraqi government said it would suspend the license of Blackwater, probably the most famous among the armies of private security contractors working inside Iraq, after an incident in central Baghdad in which government officials allege eight civilians were killed. The incident looks certain to rekindle the controversy of the wide role given to the contractors in the Iraq war, with critics saying that they operate outside the sorts of legal oversight and codes of conduct that restrict the behavior of soldiers in war zones.

Blackwater first became famous after four of its contractors were murdered in Fallujah in early 2004, an event that prompted an American assault on that city that engendered widespread anger against the US inside the country.

Reuters reports that the government is vowing a tough line with Blackwater, with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki saying the incident was a "criminal act." An Interior Ministry spokesman said the contractors, working for a US security firm, "opened fire randomly at citizens" on Sunday after mortar rounds landed near their cars: "We formed a committee to investigate the incident and withdraw the license from this company and also to deliver those who committed this act to the court," Brigadier-General Abdul-Karim Khalaf told Reuters.

The U.S. military said on Sunday security contractors working for the State Department were involved in an incident, but gave no further details.

Khalaf said the contractors opened fire after two mortar rounds landed in Nusour Square in the western Baghdad district of Mansour. "By chance the company was passing by. They opened fire randomly at citizens," Khalaf said. Eleven people were killed, including one policeman, and 13 people were wounded, he said.

The Washington Post reports that one of its employees witnessed the incident: "A Washington Post employee in the area at the time of the shooting witnessed security company helicopters firing into the streets near Nisoor Square in Mansour. Witnesses said they saw dead and wounded people on the pavement." Blackwater often uses light helicopters with riflemen at the windows to provide cover to ground-based convoys.

The Associated Press reports that witnesses said the convoy definitely came under attack: "We saw a convoy of SUVs passing in the street nearby. One minute later, we heard the sound of a bomb explosion followed by gunfire that lasted for 20 minutes between gunmen and the convoy people who were foreigners and dressed in civilian clothes. Everybody in the street started to flee immediately," said Hussein Abdul-Abbas, who owns a mobile phone store in the area.

The wartime numbers of private guards are unprecedented — as are their duties, many of which have traditionally been done by soldiers. They protect U.S. military operations and have guarded high-ranking officials including Gen. David Petraeus, the U.S. commander in Baghdad.

Blog reactions to the incident, so far, have roughly broken down along left-right lines, with right-leaning blogs viewing groups like Blackwater as patriots doing difficult jobs, and left-leaning ones seeing the groups as dangerous and financially predatory.

On Freerepublic, a popular pro-war blog, one fairly representative comment was: "Methinks they were just doing their job. The message is, if terrorists dress like civilians you can't shoot at them even if they blow up your vehicle. What cowardice." At Democratic Underground, which sits firmly on the left of the US blog divide, this was a fairly typical comment: "Goes to show what I think of the sovereignty of the Iraqi government. It will be interesting to see if they can make this stick, and improve their rep, or if [it] fails and provides another evidence of their government's impotence."

The controversy comes even as Blackwater appears set to begin offering direct counterinsurgency training to foreign air forces. A number of blogs, including Danger Room, a national security blog for Wired Magazine, referred to a subscription-only article in Jane's, a defense magazine, in late August, that said Blackwater was seeking to buy a Super Tucano light-attack plane. The Wired blog shares the following passage from the Jane's article: "Blackwater President Gary Jackson confirmed to Jane's at the Force Protection Equipment Demonstration in Stafford, Virginia, in mid-August that the company is in the process of acquiring the Super Tucano for a new training programme. If the deal goes through, it will give the company a significant boost in a growing international market for fixed-wing tactical flight instruction, as well as a potential platform for counter-insurgency-style training. The Super Tucano is in service with the Brazilian Air Force, which operates the aircraft as a primary aircraft trainer and in border-patrol missions under its SIVAM (Sistema de Vigilância da Amazônia) programme. Colombia finalised a contract for 25 Super Tucanos in December 2005; the aircraft has also been marketed to Singapore and the Dominican Republic. Fully equipped, the aircraft features five weapon hardpoints and a night-vision goggle (NVG)-compatible 'glass cockpit'."

In an interview with PBS Frontline, Peter Singer, a scholar at the Brookings Institute in Washington who has tracked the rise of Private Military Contractors (PMCs) like Blackwater, said the business is worth $100 billion a year and worries about the impact their role is having on policy and accountability: "You're talking about an industry that really didn't exist until the start of the 1990s. And since then, it's grown in size, in monetary terms to about $100 billion worth of revenue a year. In geographic terms, it operates in over 50 different countries. It's operated on every single continent but Antarctica. It operates in poor states, rich states -- you know, the Saudi Arabias, the Congo-Brazzavilles. It operates in superpowers like United States -- we're the largest client of that industry; the Pentagon's entered into over 3000 contracts with it in the last couple years -- to weak states, failed states, Sierra Leones, Liberias, Afghanistans of the world...sometimes [the Pentagon has] outsourced things that infringed upon the core function of the military. And that's when you see all these kind of questions of accountability, all these kind of questions of how the heck did we get contractors in that role, where it's not only the public that's surprised, but people in the military themselves who are surprised and offended by it."
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Old 09-17-2007, 12:58 PM   #34
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Their deaths aren't counted, their crimes aren't punished. "Security contractors" my ass. They're highly paid mercenaries who undermine what our troops are doing, and most people (including members of Congress) don't know anything about them.

I highly recommend the book Blackwater by Jeremy Scahill. Here's a short video clip with more background if anyone's interested:

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Old 09-17-2007, 01:52 PM   #35
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Blackwater 'needs no license' in Iraq


Published: Sept. 17, 2007 at 2:26 PM

WASHINGTON, Sept. 17 (UPI) -- Questions are being raised about the efficacy of Iraq’s attempt to close down Blackwater's operations in the country after civilian deaths.

Iraqi Interior Ministry officials told reporters in Baghdad Monday they would revoke the company’s license and initiate criminal proceedings after Blackwater contractors providing security for U.S. diplomats allegedly opened fire from aircraft into a Baghdad street -- killing 11 people, according to some reports.

The problem is, Blackwater does not have or need a license, and its employees are not subject to Iraqi criminal jurisdiction.

Former senior State Department official Larry Johnson wrote in his Web long No Quarter Monday, “Blackwater does not have a license to operate in Iraq and does not need one. They have a U.S. State Department contract through (the Bureau of) Diplomatic Security.”

U.S. State Department security staff, whose duties Blackwater contractors perform in Iraq, typically enjoy the same immunities accorded to all foreign diplomats.

Doug Brooks, president of The International Peace Operations Association, representing private companies involved in peace-keeping and low-intensity conflict operations around the world, said that U.S. law gave jurisdiction to federal law enforcement.

“Under the Military Extra-Territorial Jurisdiction Act,” he said, those accused of a crime “would be brought back to the U.S. and tried in federal court.”

He said that investigations could be undertaken by Dept of Justice prosecutors or FBI personnel in Iraq, working with the coalition military, but that the initial decision to refer a case for investigation would be taken by U.S. military lawyers known as JAGs.

Blackwater representatives did not return phone calls or e-mails requesting comment.
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Old 09-17-2007, 07:28 PM   #36
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On Christmas Eve 2006, a Blackwater employee got drunk while inside the Green Zone in Baghdad and got in an argument with a guard of the Iraqi Vice President. He then shot the Iraqi dead. The employee was quickly flown out of the country and, 9 months later, has not been charged with any crime. Imagine the same thing happening in the US, an Iraqi embassy guard, drunk at a a Christmas party, shooting a Secret Service agent guarding Vice President Cheney, and you can see some potential for underlying tension there.
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Old 09-18-2007, 11:37 AM   #37
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In the documentary "No End in Sight" there is footage of Blackwater mercenaries shooting at everything in sight without justification. I've heard too many of these stories now and I'm glad this is finally getting some attention in mainstream media.
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Old 09-18-2007, 11:48 AM   #38
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I saw that movie, too.


I've spent so much time on all of this,
that the movie was just depressing to me
seeing all the things I believe
confirmed on the big screen


however, I do recommend everyone seeing this film


back to blackwater,

there will be a few more news stories

but at the end of the day
blackwater will remain in Iraq with fingers on the triggers
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Old 09-18-2007, 11:53 AM   #39
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There's a Blackwater debate with Jeremy Scahill on Democracy Now:

http://www.democracynow.org/article....7/09/18/140201

I agree with you about No End in Sight. Even though there wasn't all that much new in the film for me, just seeing it all laid out like that with first person testimonials really depressed me. I went home kind of numb and out of it.
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Old 09-19-2007, 04:34 PM   #40
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Iraqi officials now say at least 20 civilians were killed in the Sunday shooting incident in Baghdad involving the contractors. A joint U.S.-Iraqi commission is investigating the shootings that took place on Sunday.

"We will never allow Iraqi citizens to be killed in cold blood by this company which doesn't care about the lives of Iraqis," al-Maliki said.
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