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Old 01-25-2008, 02:20 AM   #901
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Mr. Kucinich ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2004. He told The Plain Dealer on Thursday that he would not endorse another Democrat in the presidential primary.
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Old 01-25-2008, 08:14 AM   #902
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NEW YORK (CNN) -- The New York Times endorsed Arizona Sen. John McCain for the Republican presidential nomination over Rudy Giuliani and the rest of the GOP field, strongly criticizing the former mayor of its home city.

In endorsements posted on its Web site for Friday's editions, the Times also endorsed New York Sen. Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination.

"Senator John McCain of Arizona is the only Republican who promises to end the George Bush style of governing from and on behalf of a small, angry fringe," the paper's editorial board wrote.

"With a record of working across the aisle to develop sound bipartisan legislation, he would offer a choice to a broader range of Americans than the rest of the Republican field."

The endorsement anticipated readers asking how the New York paper could reject Giuliani, a man it endorsed for re-election in 1997 and praised for his work cleaning up crime in the city and during the time of the September 11, 2001 attacks.

"That man is not running for president," the paper wrote.

"The Rudolph Giuliani of 2008 first shamelessly turned the horror of 9/11 into a lucrative business, with a secret client list, then exploited his city's and the country's nightmare to promote his presidential campaign," the paper writes, describing Giuliani as "a narrow, obsessively secretive, vindictive man."

Giuliani played down the harsh words, suggesting that the Times has a liberal editorial staff that often disapproved of him.

"I probably never did anything the New York Times suggested I do in eight years as mayor of New York City, and if I did, I wouldn't be considered a conservative Republican," Giuliani said during a Republican debate Thursday night hosted by MSNBC in Boca Raton, Florida.

"I changed welfare, I changed quality of life, I took on homelessness -- I did all the things that they think makes you mean and I believe show true compassion and true love for people."

His wasn't the only Republican campaign taking that tack. An e-mail from the campaign of former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney sarcastically noted that McCain had been endorsed by "[t]hat bastion of conservative advocacy."

The editorial was hardly full of praise for McCain, despite calling him a "genuine war hero" and a "staunch advocate of campaign finance reform."

"Mr. McCain was one of the first prominent Republicans to point out how badly the war in Iraq was being managed. We wish he could now see as clearly past the temporary victories produced by Mr. Bush's unsustainable escalation, which have not led to any change in Iraq's murderous political calculus," it reads.

"At the least, he owes Americans a real idea of how he would win this war, which he says he can do."

The paper praised Clinton's chief rival, Sen. Barack Obama, but called Clinton more qualified for the job.

"It is unfair, especially after seven years of Mr. Bush's inept leadership, but any Democrat will face tougher questioning about his or her fitness to be commander in chief," it reads.

"Mrs. Clinton has more than cleared that bar, using her years in the Senate well to immerse herself in national security issues, and has won the respect of world leaders and many in the American military."

The Democratic editorial contrasts Clinton and Obama -- calling her "the brilliant if at times harsh-sounding senator from New York" and him "the incandescent if still undefined senator from Illinois."

The paper says Clinton "sometimes overstates the importance of [her] resume," but that upon hearing "her policies and answers for America's big problems, we are hugely impressed by the depth of her knowledge, by the force of her intellect and by the breadth of, yes, her experience."

New York is one of a host of states that will vote during the February 5 Super Tuesday primaries.
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Old 01-25-2008, 08:32 AM   #903
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Christianity Today

Q&A: Barack Obama

"I believe in the redemptive death and resurrection of Jesus Christ."
Interview by Sarah Pulliam and Ted Olsen | posted 1/23/2008 02:18PM

Barack Obama wants to set the record straight. He is not a Muslim, as recent e-mails falsely claim.

The Democratic presidential candidate is fighting the e-mails that have been widely circulated. Obama has been continually speaking about the role of faith in politics since his Call to Renewal address in June 2006.

In the days before the South Carolina primary, he is driving efforts to speaking with media to emphasize his Christian beliefs. His campaign also sent out a recent mailer portraying the candidate with his head bowed in prayer and says that he will be guided by prayer when he is in office.

The senator from Illinois spoke with Sarah Pulliam and Ted Olsen today about his faith, abortion, and the evangelical vote.

What do you think your biggest obstacle will be in reaching evangelicals?

You know, I think that there's been a set of habits of thinking about the interaction between evangelicals and Democrats that we have to change. Democrats haven't shown up. Evangelicals have come to believe often times that Democrats are anti-faith. Part of my job in this campaign, something that I started doing well before this campaign, was to make sure I was showing up and reaching out and sharing my faith experience with people who share that faith. Hopefully we can build some bridges that can allow us to move the country forward.

What would you do in office differently than Hillary Clinton or John Edwards that would appeal to evangelicals?

I have not focused on all of their policies so I don't want to speak about what their positions will be. I know that as president, I want to celebrate the richness and diversity of our faith experience in this country. I think it is important for us to encourage churches and congregations all across the country to involve themselves in rebuilding communities. One of the things I have consistently argued is that we can structure faith-based programs that prove to be successful — like substance abuse or prison ministries — without violating church and state. We should make sure they are rebuilding the lives of people even if they're not members of a particular congregation. That's the kind of involvement that I think many churches are pursuing, including my own. It can make a real difference in the lives of people all across the country.

So would you keep the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives open or restructure it?

You know, what I'd like to do is I'd like to see how it's been operating. One of the things that I think churches have to be mindful of is that if the federal government starts paying the piper, then they get to call the tune. It can, over the long term, be an encroachment on religious freedom. So, I want to see how moneys have been allocated through that office before I make a firm commitment in terms of sustaining practices that may not have worked as well as they should have.

One of the critiques of the Bush office on faith-based initiatives — beyond the church and state question — is that while it opened up competition to religious organizations or church-based organizations to compete for some of these federal funds, there was no additional allocation; there was no change in the funding. Instead, there were more organizations competing for the same the slice of pie.

I think that's right. There's always a danger in those situations that money is being allocating based on politics, as opposed to merit and substance. That doesn't just compromise government. More importantly, it compromises potentially our religious institutions.

For many evangelicals, abortion is a key, if not the key factor in their vote. You voted against banning partial birth abortion and voted against notifying parents of minors who get out-of-state abortions. What role do you think the President should play in creating national abortion policies?

I don't know anybody who is pro-abortion. I think it's very important to start with that premise. I think people recognize what a wrenching, difficult issue it is. I do think that those who diminish the moral elements of the decision aren't expressing the full reality of it. But what I believe is that women do not make these decisions casually, and that they struggle with it fervently with their pastors, with their spouses, with their doctors.

Our goal should be to make abortion less common, that we should be discouraging unwanted pregnancies, that we should encourage adoption wherever possible. There is a range of ways that we can educate our young people about the sacredness of sex and we should not be promoting the sort of casual activities that end up resulting in so many unwanted pregnancies.

Ultimately, women are in the best position to make a decision at the end of the day about these issues. With significant constraints. For example, I think we can legitimately say — the state can legitimately say — that we are prohibiting late-term abortions as long as there's an exception for the mother's health. Those provisions that I voted against typically didn't have those exceptions, which raises profound questions where you might have a mother at great risk. Those are issues that I don't think the government can unilaterally make a decision about. I think they need to be made in consultation with doctors, they have to be prayed upon, or people have to be consulting their conscience on it. I think we have to keep that decision-making with the person themselves.

You've talked about your experience walking down the aisle at Trinity United Church of Christ, and kneeling beneath the cross, having your sins redeemed, and submitting to God's will. Would you describe that as a conversion? Do you consider yourself born again?

I am a Christian, and I am a devout Christian. I believe in the redemptive death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. I believe that that faith gives me a path to be cleansed of sin and have eternal life. But most importantly, I believe in the example that Jesus set by feeding the hungry and healing the sick and always prioritizing the least of these over the powerful. I didn't 'fall out in church' as they say, but there was a very strong awakening in me of the importance of these issues in my life. I didn't want to walk alone on this journey. Accepting Jesus Christ in my life has been a powerful guide for my conduct and my values and my ideals.

There is one thing that I want to mention that I think is important. Part of what we've been seeing during the course this campaign is some scurrilous e-mails that have been sent out, denying my faith, talking about me being a Muslim, suggesting that I got sworn in the U.S. Senate with a Quran in my hand or that I don't pledge allegiance to the flag. I think it's really important for your readers to know that I have been a member of the same church for almost 20 years, and I have never practiced Islam. I am respectful of the religion, but it's not my own. One of the things that's very important in this day and age is that we don't use religion as a political tool and certainly that we don't lie about religion as a way to score political points. I just thought it was important to get that in there to dispel rumors that have been over the Internet. We've done so repeatedly, but obviously it's a political tactic of somebody to try to provide this misinformation.

Is there any sense of how wide this e-mail has been distributed?

This is similar to these smear tactics that were used against John McCain in 2000. We have to continually chase down this stuff. It's obviously being sent out in a systematic way. You guys really help by getting the story straight.
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Old 01-25-2008, 08:46 AM   #904
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I've seen all sorts of emails about Obama and him being Muslim, about him being Catholic, all sorts of stuff.
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Old 01-25-2008, 08:47 AM   #905
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It really is a shame that Kucinich dropped out.
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Old 01-25-2008, 01:12 PM   #906
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mitt had a good night.

dbs
Yes, Romney did very well.

It was also interesting to see how tame the debate was. I don't think I heard a single hostile statement, and the compliments were flying. Clearly they're aware of how the Obama-Clintons fight is turning people off.
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Old 01-25-2008, 02:52 PM   #907
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McCain's soft on immigration stand, helps him with the Cuban-Americans in Florida.

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Fla. Sen. Martinez to Endorse McCain

Jan 25 03:07 PM US/Eastern

By LIZ SIDOTI and BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press Writers

MIAMI (AP) - Florida Sen. Mel Martinez will endorse John McCain on Friday, The Associated Press has learned, a move likely to give the Republican presidential candidate a crucial boost with the state's Cuban- Americans just days before the primary.

The decision is a blow to Rudy Giuliani, the former New York mayor in a close fight with McCain for support of voters in the Cuban-American community—and to keep his candidacy alive.

Martinez, who was born in Cuba, emigrated to the United States as a teenager.

Florida's primary is Tuesday, and polls show McCain in a close race with Mitt Romney while Giuliani trails in his must-win state.

Martinez and McCain are longtime friends from the Senate, and worked closely together on a bill that would have created an eventual path to citizenship for millions of illegal immigrants in the country.

The two will appear together at the Latin Builder's Association meeting, where the endorsement will be announced. Romney spoke to the group earlier, and Giuliani was finishing up his speech when the news broke. He left without taking questions from reporters.

Martinez is a first-term senator who served as President Bush's secretary of Housing and Urban Development from 2001 until 2003. Last October, he stepped down as the general chairman of the Republican National Committee after serving only 10 months.

Martinez is the fourth prominent Cuban-American lawmaker to back McCain. Three members of Miami's congressional delegation—Reps. Lincoln Diaz-Balart, Mario Diaz-Balart and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen—previously gave McCain their support.
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Old 01-25-2008, 03:02 PM   #908
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Originally posted by verte76
I've seen all sorts of emails about Obama and him being Muslim, about him being Catholic, all sorts of stuff.
I have not heard of this happening much in CA.


I wonder who is generating it?

I think the South is still pretty divided on race.

Even in the Democratic Party.

Happy? to say the Republican Party is not.

In the South Carolina Primary,
it seems many are voting "idenity", by the group to which they belong.

Much the way the Iraqis did. The secular party got 5% of the vote. The rest seemed to get the purple thumbs to identify themselves as a Shia, Sunni or Kurd.

In S C, if polls are to be believed, the majority of Black Americans will vote Obama. And the majority of White, Hispanic Americans will vote for Hillary or Edwards.
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Old 01-25-2008, 04:40 PM   #909
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DK Go Home

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Old 01-25-2008, 05:44 PM   #910
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Clever.
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Old 01-26-2008, 04:12 AM   #911
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It's kind of strange, but as much as I like Obama I never really like it when he talks about faith. . .I don't like it when any politicians do, at least that I've heard. They always sound fake. Sadly Obama is no exception.
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Old 01-26-2008, 10:29 AM   #912
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This is interesting. I'm watching Morning Joe on MSNBC and they've got Rep. James Clyburn on talking about the South Carolina primary.

Rep. Clyburn and Joe Scarborough are from the south, Mika Bresinzky (sp?) and David Shuster are from the north. Both Clyburn and Scarborough are bristling over comments from the Clinton campaign, and Mika and David don't get it.

They're talking about the disconnect of interpretation between North and South, which explains a lot. I believe we're seeing that here in FYM.
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Old 01-26-2008, 10:56 AM   #913
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II don't like it when any politicians do, at least that I've heard. They always sound fake. .
I have to agree with this. It sounds like they're pandering to the faith crowd, trying to reassure them.
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Old 01-26-2008, 11:07 AM   #914
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Originally posted by U2democrat
This is interesting. I'm watching Morning Joe on MSNBC and they've got Rep. James Clyburn on talking about the South Carolina primary.

Rep. Clyburn and Joe Scarborough are from the south, Mika Bresinzky (sp?) and David Shuster are from the north. Both Clyburn and Scarborough are bristling over comments from the Clinton campaign, and Mika and David don't get it.

They're talking about the disconnect of interpretation between North and South, which explains a lot. I believe we're seeing that here in FYM.
That's kind of interesting. Do you have specifics?
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Old 01-26-2008, 11:10 AM   #915
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I believe they were really talking about MLK, injecting race...they said it better I'm hoping the video will be posted.
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