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Old 12-20-2007, 01:07 PM   #31
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Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
Brett Favre


I think Bush said his person of the year is Petraeus

How about Larry Craig?

Or maybe McCain said that. I guess perhaps Mitt's unfamiliar with some of the standards they have for person of the year and some of the other choices they have made in the past.

WASHINGTON (CNN) — Count Republican Mitt Romney among those who aren't happy with Time Magazine's choice of Russian President Vladimir Putin for Person of the Year.

In an interview with CNN's Glen Beck, the presidential candidate called the choice "disgusting."

"You know, he imprisoned his political opponents. There have been a number of highly suspicious murders," Romney said on Beck's radio show. "He has squelched public dissent and free press. And to suggest that someone like that is the Man of the Year is really disgusting. I'm just appalled."

"Clearly General Petraeus is the person, or one of a few people, who would certainly merit that designation," the former Massachusetts governor added.

Rival presidential candidate John McCain also said Wednesday he disagreed with the choice.

“I noticed that Time Magazine made President Putin the Time Magazine ‘Man of the Year,’” McCain said, according to NBC. “I understand that probably, but my man of the year is one Gen. David Petraeus, our general who has brought success in Iraq.”
Wow, the Time Magazine's Person of the Year is now going for so many decades and still so many people haven't gotten the concept behind it.
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Old 12-20-2007, 01:28 PM   #32
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Originally posted by Strongbow

Baghdad is NOT an ethnically cleansed city. Not even close.
This article might dispute that:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...121501921.html

Quote:
...
For many Iraqis, the homes they left no longer exist. Houses have been looted, destroyed or occupied. Most Baghdad neighborhoods, where Shiites and Sunnis once lived side by side, have been transformed into religiously homogeneous bastions where members of the other sect dare not tread.
...
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Old 12-20-2007, 02:24 PM   #33
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Those are accomplishments that not even I would have predicted in such a small space of time, and Democrats like Murtha have now come forward to admit that the Surge is indeed working.


do you even pay attention to the news? i mean really. do you? or do you just spit out the spin you read every day?

[q]Murtha said: "I think the surge is working, I think -- but that's only one element. ... There's no question in my mind that if you put more forces in ... it's going to work out. But the thing that has to happen, the Iraqis have to do this themselves." Murtha went on to state that, according to Gen. David Petraeus and U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker, "the impression was, that I got from all of them, [was] that the central government is pretty close to dysfunctional." Moreover, in a statement released the next day, Murtha reaffirmed his support for the very legislation that Henry cited -- a $50 billion war funding bill passed by the House, which Murtha voted for, that mandates that the United States begin withdrawing troops from Iraq, "[w]ithin 30 days after enactment of this Act." Murtha added that "[t]he fact remains that the war in Iraq cannot be won militarily, and that we must begin an orderly redeployment of U.S. forces from Iraq as soon as practicable."[/q]
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Old 12-20-2007, 02:26 PM   #34
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and anyone who thinks that Patraeus has had more impact on the world than Putin is towing a politicized GOP line -- one that McCain, who's entire candidacy is going to rest on the perception of Iraq -- where they want to keep touting the "successes" of "the surge" in order to score whatever points they can.

the two are not even comparable.
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Old 12-20-2007, 05:43 PM   #35
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This article might dispute that:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...121501921.html

If Baghdad was ethnically cleansed, it would be impossible for Sunni Arabs, Kurds or anyone that was not Shia to even consider returning to the Baghdad area and that is far from being the case. Cities in Bosnia were ethnically cleansed, but that has not happened in Iraq at this point.
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Old 12-20-2007, 05:47 PM   #36
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Fine. Ethnically rinsed.
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Old 12-20-2007, 05:52 PM   #37
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here's what the article has to say:

[q]The vast population upheaval resulting from Iraq's sectarian conflict has left the country with yet another looming crisis. At least one of every six Iraqis -- about 4.5 million people -- has left home, some for other parts of Iraq, others for neighboring nations.

Many have run out of money and options in Syria, Jordan and other Arab countries, all of which have recently intensified efforts to evict Iraqi refugees. Others have exhausted the patience and resources of family and friends. Lured by reports of security improvements and encouraged by a government eager to demonstrate normalcy, they have started to trickle back over the past two months.

The question of how to deal with them is posing a complex new challenge for Iraq's government, as well as for U.S. military commanders, diplomats and international aid workers here. U.S. and U.N. officials have been pushing Iraqi leaders to develop programs and policies aimed at addressing the vexing problems associated with returning refugees.

"It's very easy to say, 'Come home,' " said Guy Siri, the U.N. deputy humanitarian coordinator in Iraq. "But come home where, and how? It's much more complex than that. You have to look at the whole environment, how the community will accept them, whether it's economically viable. There's a whole lot of thinking on the government side to be done."

Kareem Sadi Haadi, 48, an engineer who now works in a shoe store in Baghdad's Karrada neighborhood, said he returned from Damascus last month with his wife and daughter only because his savings ran out and he was not allowed to work legally in Syria. He said he is trying to save enough money to flee Iraq again.

The Iraqi government should not be telling refugees that the country is secure or offering to ferry them back from Syria, Haadi said, adding, "They are misleading Iraqis 100 percent. Eighty percent of those who want to come back is because of residency complications in Syria."

The thorny issues were evident when the first and so far only group of families was bused back from Syria by the Iraqi government on Nov. 28. According to the United Nations, only about a third of the 30 families returned to their original homes. Most of the rest, finding a new sectarian makeup in their neighborhood or their property pillaged, moved in with already overburdened relatives in other parts of the Baghdad area.

For many Iraqis, the homes they left no longer exist. Houses have been looted, destroyed or occupied. Most Baghdad neighborhoods, where Shiites and Sunnis once lived side by side, have been transformed into religiously homogeneous bastions where members of the other sect dare not tread.

U.S. military commanders and diplomats here acknowledge that the recent decline in violence is the result, in part, of the city's segregation. There are now far fewer mixed neighborhoods where religious militias can target members of the other sect.

"There is an element of the violence being down because segregation has already happened," said Col. William E. Rapp, a senior aide to Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq. "The violence is still at the fault lines, and we're sitting on those fault lines."

Rapp said Iraqis have to ask themselves: "Do you even want to come back? Because that neighborhood is no longer Sunni, it's now Shia. Or it's no longer Shia, it's now Sunni."[/q]





but i suppose those are just liberal lies. after all, we got a sentence fragment from Rep. Murtha that acknowledges that there are some aspects of "the surge" that have been successful, and this means that Bush and Co. are thoroughly and totally vindicated and the United States is the best country ever and anyone who ever criticized anything ever should just shut up now because Iraq is now just like Bosnia.
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Old 12-20-2007, 05:53 PM   #38
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Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
"You know, he imprisoned his political opponents. There have been a number of highly suspicious murders," Romney said on Beck's radio show. "He has squelched public dissent and free press. And to suggest that someone like that is the Man of the Year is really disgusting. I'm just appalled."

"Clearly General Petraeus is the person, or one of a few people, who would certainly merit that designation," the former Massachusetts governor added.

Rival presidential candidate John McCain also said Wednesday he disagreed with the choice.

“I noticed that Time Magazine made President Putin the Time Magazine ‘Man of the Year,’” McCain said, according to NBC. “I understand that probably, but my man of the year is one Gen. David Petraeus, our general who has brought success in Iraq.”
Hahaha.... (a) they don't understand the premise of this 'award', (b) they want to be President?
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Old 12-20-2007, 05:58 PM   #39
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McCain is just looking to surge his numbers in New Hampshire.

if it doesn't happen there, he's over.
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Old 12-20-2007, 05:58 PM   #40
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Originally posted by Irvine511




do you even pay attention to the news? i mean really. do you? or do you just spit out the spin you read every day?

[q]Murtha said: "I think the surge is working, I think -- but that's only one element. ... There's no question in my mind that if you put more forces in ... it's going to work out. But the thing that has to happen, the Iraqis have to do this themselves." Murtha went on to state that, according to Gen. David Petraeus and U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker, "the impression was, that I got from all of them, [was] that the central government is pretty close to dysfunctional." Moreover, in a statement released the next day, Murtha reaffirmed his support for the very legislation that Henry cited -- a $50 billion war funding bill passed by the House, which Murtha voted for, that mandates that the United States begin withdrawing troops from Iraq, "[w]ithin 30 days after enactment of this Act." Murtha added that "[t]he fact remains that the war in Iraq cannot be won militarily, and that we must begin an orderly redeployment of U.S. forces from Iraq as soon as practicable."[/q]
Well, I guess Murtha likes to have it both ways. An interesting question would be if Murtha read the latest NIE report on Iraq, from August 2007, which had the following to say about redeployment and withdrawal:

Quote:
We assess that changing the mission of Coalition forces from a primarily counterinsurgency and stabilization role to a primary combat support role for Iraqi forces and counterterrorist operations to prevent AQI from establishing a safehaven would erode security gains achieved thus far. The impact of a change in mission on Iraq's political and security environment and thourghout the region probably would vary in intensity and suddenness of onset in relation to the rate and scale of a Coalition redeployment. Developments within the Iraqi communities themselves will be decisive in determining political and security trajectories.
Quote:
Recent security improvements in Iraq, including success against AQI, have depended significantly on the close synchronization of conventional counterinsurgency and counterterrorism operations. A change of mission that interrupts that synchronization would place security improvements at risk.
So are you still a supporter of withdrawal and redeployment now that the beloved NIE has essentially come out against those options?
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Old 12-20-2007, 06:03 PM   #41
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Well, I guess Murtha likes to have it both ways. An interesting question would be if Murtha read the latest NIE report on Iraq, from August 2007, which had the following to say about redeployment and withdrawal:



So are you still a supporter of withdrawal and redeployment now that the beloved NIE has essentially come out against those options?


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Old 12-20-2007, 06:09 PM   #42
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Originally posted by Irvine511


here's what the article has to say:

[q]The vast population upheaval resulting from Iraq's sectarian conflict has left the country with yet another looming crisis. At least one of every six Iraqis -- about 4.5 million people -- has left home, some for other parts of Iraq, others for neighboring nations.

Many have run out of money and options in Syria, Jordan and other Arab countries, all of which have recently intensified efforts to evict Iraqi refugees. Others have exhausted the patience and resources of family and friends. Lured by reports of security improvements and encouraged by a government eager to demonstrate normalcy, they have started to trickle back over the past two months.

The question of how to deal with them is posing a complex new challenge for Iraq's government, as well as for U.S. military commanders, diplomats and international aid workers here. U.S. and U.N. officials have been pushing Iraqi leaders to develop programs and policies aimed at addressing the vexing problems associated with returning refugees.

"It's very easy to say, 'Come home,' " said Guy Siri, the U.N. deputy humanitarian coordinator in Iraq. "But come home where, and how? It's much more complex than that. You have to look at the whole environment, how the community will accept them, whether it's economically viable. There's a whole lot of thinking on the government side to be done."

Kareem Sadi Haadi, 48, an engineer who now works in a shoe store in Baghdad's Karrada neighborhood, said he returned from Damascus last month with his wife and daughter only because his savings ran out and he was not allowed to work legally in Syria. He said he is trying to save enough money to flee Iraq again.

The Iraqi government should not be telling refugees that the country is secure or offering to ferry them back from Syria, Haadi said, adding, "They are misleading Iraqis 100 percent. Eighty percent of those who want to come back is because of residency complications in Syria."

The thorny issues were evident when the first and so far only group of families was bused back from Syria by the Iraqi government on Nov. 28. According to the United Nations, only about a third of the 30 families returned to their original homes. Most of the rest, finding a new sectarian makeup in their neighborhood or their property pillaged, moved in with already overburdened relatives in other parts of the Baghdad area.

For many Iraqis, the homes they left no longer exist. Houses have been looted, destroyed or occupied. Most Baghdad neighborhoods, where Shiites and Sunnis once lived side by side, have been transformed into religiously homogeneous bastions where members of the other sect dare not tread.

U.S. military commanders and diplomats here acknowledge that the recent decline in violence is the result, in part, of the city's segregation. There are now far fewer mixed neighborhoods where religious militias can target members of the other sect.

"There is an element of the violence being down because segregation has already happened," said Col. William E. Rapp, a senior aide to Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq. "The violence is still at the fault lines, and we're sitting on those fault lines."

Rapp said Iraqis have to ask themselves: "Do you even want to come back? Because that neighborhood is no longer Sunni, it's now Shia. Or it's no longer Shia, it's now Sunni."[/q]





but i suppose those are just liberal lies. after all, we got a sentence fragment from Rep. Murtha that acknowledges that there are some aspects of "the surge" that have been successful, and this means that Bush and Co. are thoroughly and totally vindicated and the United States is the best country ever and anyone who ever criticized anything ever should just shut up now because Iraq is now just like Bosnia.
The article does not say anything about Baghdad being ethnically cleansed. Some of us that have actually read about ethnic cleansing in Bosnia and other parts of the world would not define it that way. Srebrenica Bosnia is an example of a city that has been ethnically cleansed. One day Bosnian Serb military came into the city, ordered Dutch UN peacekeepers to the side, loaded all the non-Serb males of military age on to buses(over 8,000), and non-Serb women and childern on to other buses. The women and children were bused out of the city, and the men were all taking into the woods and shot, all in one day. There is no Croat section of Srebrenica, or Muslim section of Srebrenica, there is just one ethnic group, Serbs. That is what it means to be "ethnically cleansed" and that is not even remotely the situation in Baghdad.
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Old 12-20-2007, 06:15 PM   #43
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yes, because there has only ever been one incident of ethnic cleansing ever that that's Srebrenica.

the article states, explicitly, as does everyone else, that a MAJOR factor for the decrease in violence in Baghdad -- the decrease that's being desperately promoted by McCain and others as some sort of vindication -- is because neighborhoods that were once ETHNICALLY MIXED are now no longer mixed. these neighborhoods have been CLEANSED of either Sunnis or Shiites. 4.5 million fled, hundreds of thousands have been killed.

but, no, i guess it's not Srebrenica, so it doesn't count.
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Old 12-20-2007, 06:18 PM   #44
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and anyone who thinks that Patraeus has had more impact on the world than Putin is towing a politicized GOP line -- one that McCain, who's entire candidacy is going to rest on the perception of Iraq -- where they want to keep touting the "successes" of "the surge" in order to score whatever points they can.

the two are not even comparable.
Well, perhaps you could explain how Putin has impacted Iraq, the middle east, and US politics to a greater degree than Patraeus in 2007? Has Russian obstruction to Kosovo independence or refusal for a new round of sanctions on Iran really been the main story of 2007? Beyond politics inside Russia, how has Putin impacted global events and global politics to a greater degree than Patraeus in 2007?
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Old 12-20-2007, 06:20 PM   #45
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Why are Iraq, the Middle East, and US politics the only "global events and politics" that matter?
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