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Old 10-19-2007, 12:18 PM   #976
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No worries. It's one of those films where watching it a second time knowing how it turns out can help you spot loads that you may have missed before. Not that I needed any encouragement to watch it again...
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Old 10-19-2007, 02:47 PM   #977
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The final scene of the loop of them running on the beach gives me shivers. Breathtaking.
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Old 10-19-2007, 05:34 PM   #978
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And yet, I somehow find the end of Being John Malkovich to be even better. The end credits with the underwater shots of the girl swimming with Burwell's score behind it...man, really powerful stuff.

Though overall Eternal Sunshine is the better film.
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Old 10-20-2007, 03:01 AM   #979
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Gone Baby Gone


Well, you won't hear me making a Ben Affleck joke ever again. I'm pretty shocked at how much I liked this film. Having lived in Boston for about 5 years, this was like slipping on an old familiar coat. One that's ratty and stinks, but comfortable in some odd way. The atmosphere, dialogue and people in this film are note perfect.

Casey Affleck is perhaps even better here than he is in James/Ford, simply because it he perf isn't gimmicky, but more human and fleshed-out. Ed Harris, just when you think you've seen him do everything, continues to stretch himself (the hairpiece probably helps). Also, out from a time machine steps Taggart from Beverly Hills Cop as his partner! Holy shit! Nice to see that guy again (John Ashton).

The plot is pretty intricate, and hard to keep all in your head at once, but very engrossing. The climax and end of the film pose some very interesting moral questions that I'm sure are going to cause many discussions between members of the audience. I'm still not sure where I fall on this thing. Just a fantastic finish to a film.

I can't believe I'm typing this, but this may wind up in my top 5.

And BTW, this blows the overrated Mystic River out of the fucking water.
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Old 10-20-2007, 03:03 AM   #980
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Wow. Excellent words.

Looks like I need to see this one now. Never thought that would happen.
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Old 10-20-2007, 03:29 AM   #981
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you mean I'm not the only one who thought Mystic River was overrated
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Old 10-20-2007, 06:21 AM   #982
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Quote:
Originally posted by lazarus
Gone Baby Gone


Well, you won't hear me making a Ben Affleck joke ever again. I'm pretty shocked at how much I liked this film. Having lived in Boston for about 5 years, this was like slipping on an old familiar coat. One that's ratty and stinks, but comfortable in some odd way. The atmosphere, dialogue and people in this film are note perfect.

Casey Affleck is perhaps even better here than he is in James/Ford, simply because it he perf isn't gimmicky, but more human and fleshed-out. Ed Harris, just when you think you've seen him do everything, continues to stretch himself (the hairpiece probably helps). Also, out from a time machine steps Taggart from Beverly Hills Cop as his partner! Holy shit! Nice to see that guy again (John Ashton).

The plot is pretty intricate, and hard to keep all in your head at once, but very engrossing. The climax and end of the film pose some very interesting moral questions that I'm sure are going to cause many discussions between members of the audience. I'm still not sure where I fall on this thing. Just a fantastic finish to a film.

I can't believe I'm typing this, but this may wind up in my top 5.

And BTW, this blows the overrated Mystic River out of the fucking water.


I'm SHOCKED at how much I liked this film. Ben Affleck (no longer Oofleck) actually made me think something other than "someone oughta kill this guy for the good of the world." Casey Afleck was fantastic, but lets not overlook Ed Harris.
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Old 10-21-2007, 12:00 AM   #983
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The Birds

Pretty disappointing, although the tension before the attack scenes and actual attack scenes were handled well. Rod Taylor kicked some Morlock-level ass in this one, too.

**1/2 out of ****
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Old 10-21-2007, 03:11 AM   #984
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The Wall

Mmkay. Pretty damn weird. Great film though. Tonight was the first night I saw it in full, and I must say that I'm impressed. I was a bit disappointed by the lack of dialogue at first, but I think that started to work to the film's advantage by the end. Great direction, and creative cinematic moments abound. Sick as it sounds, I actually found parts of it hilarious, especially the reading of Money in front of the class. "'Think I'll buy me a football team'? Utter rubbish!" The funny part is those are indeed some of Roger's weaker lyrics, from that album or otherwise. Inside joke? Heck yeah.

I did find some of it confusing, however. Most of my questions are probably unanswerable, but the main one is "why did Pink become leader of the Floydian International Nazi Party towards the end"? I just don't understand what it's supposed to represent.

Anyway, the film has a great message, but I would recommend it only to viewers 13 and up, as it is pretty gory (the only part I winced at was the shaving scene ).

My tribute to the film, from a comic I made over the summer:



So yeah, I enjoyed this film. I prefer the album, but the movie was clearly very well made.

7.5/10
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Old 10-21-2007, 11:10 AM   #985
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LemonMelon, I think you have to look at the "nazi" scenes a bit more abstractly. The idea is that the school system with its hard position on discipline attempts to turn children into obedient little soldiers. Even though Pink seems to rebel against this, it's hard to overcome what's been engrained in you since youth. Combine this with the power his mother has over him, and this is what he becomes. That's still a fairly literal interpretation. There's also something about rock and roll fans are very fervent in their appreciation, and at times rock concerts do seem like fascist rallies. When you're getting 30,000 people to sing along to what you tell them, put lighters in the air, pump their fists, etc. It's a little bit of mind control.

I'm a fairly big Pink Floyd fan, but to me The Wall is one of their weaker albums from a musical standpoint. It's very "normal" sounding. I think when you pay too much attention to the lyrics and the concept the music is going to suffer as a result. Because of this, and this might sound like blasphemy, I feel the film is better than the album, which is written very cinematically anyway.

Alan Parker is a brilliant director and should be given a lot of credit. He's worked in many different genres, and used to be my favorite filmmaker when I was younger. Some others to check out:


Angel Heart
Mississippi Burning
Birdy
Midnight Express
The Commitments
The Road to Wellville
Bugsy Malone
Shoot the Moon
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Old 10-21-2007, 11:47 AM   #986
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Thanks for that. The film is indeed very abstract, and it's occasionally tough to tell what's reality and what's simply going on in Pink's head, plus the chronology is weird (the Stop scene, for instance, really confused me as well).

Agreed on Parker's directing talents, and it's the strangest thing, but Birdy came to mind during the scene for Nobody Home. I'll check out more of his work.
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Old 10-21-2007, 01:14 PM   #987
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Reign Over Me

7/10

I remember wanting to see this when I saw the trailers, but reviews were pretty mixed, so I decided it was a DVD rental, not a theater movie.

I liked it! I thought Sandler did well, with only one or two moments where he annoyed me. I laughed to see BJ Novak (Ryan from "The Office") as the asshole lawyer near the end.
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Old 10-21-2007, 03:45 PM   #988
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Gone Baby Gone

8/10

I liked the entire film, all aspects of it.

Especially the ending.


In times like these -
when we have a continued involvement in Iraq ,
the rational thing to do would be for the U S to draw down and pull out

and the counter argument is only

"We are doing the right thing
it does not matter what the costs are,
or the consequences."

- the person that is the "decider" smugly hides behind the premise of "absolutes".
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Old 10-21-2007, 04:48 PM   #989
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Ikiru
Powerful early film by the brilliant Akira Kurosawa that somehow manages to be both life affirming and pessimistic. The film opens with an x-ray of, as the narrator informs us, our hero. He has stomach cancer you see, but he doesn’t know that just yet. ‘Our hero’ finds this out soon enough and begins to extract himself from the hollow, joyless life he has been trapped in foe the past 30 years, first for worse and then for the better. Unlike Kurosawa’s more famous samurai films, this is set in contemporary Japan and explores a range of themes, from living life, impending death and the extent to which one man can really make a difference both to his surroundings and his peers. Highly recommended.

Du Rififi chez les Hommes
Essentially a heist flick, this French effort follows the same path as many others, The Asphalt Jungle springing to my mind first. Group of crooks get together to plan and execute a robbery, which they pull off by the skin of their teeth, but then the trouble starts… The heist itself is very famous as it contains over twirty minutes with no dialogue or music, just the sounds the group make as they make their score. Solid performances and taut direction also help to elevate this above many other similar films.

Boomerang!
I like my courtroom dramas, sometimes they can be corny or rely on theatrics far too much, but I can’t help but be sucked into them. This was no exception, with Dana Andrews playing the DA who instead of prosecuting the man accused of shooting a priest in cold blood believes that they have the wrong man on trial and defends him. The attraction of the film is Andrews’ tearing apart the eyewitnesses who all swear that the man is guilty but in time their testimonies are called into doubt. Cracking performance by Andrews and yes, there are some theatrics in the courtroom.

Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid
Delightfully silly spoof of 40s film noir with Steve Martin. He plays a PI investigating the death of a prominent cheese scientist, but that doesn’t really matter. The selling point is the fact that the creators spliced in footage from many classic noir / detective films from the period and arrange the archive footage to help propel the absurd plot. Any film that features Cary Grant, Humphrey Bogart, James Cagney, Ingrid Bergman, Lana Turner and Barbara Stanwyck is surely worth a look, and the fact it’s directed and stars the team behind The Jerk is a bonus.

Grosse Pointe Blank
I’ve always thought of this as a strange one. Way before Shaun of the Dead came along with it’s rom-zom-com concept, there was this rom-com about a hitman that gets pretty violent when it wants to without any warning. John Cusack is on fine form as the hitman returning to his hometown for a high school reunion, Dan Ackroyd plays his rival and Minnie Driver is the old flame he jilted on Prom night. But I’m sure most of you have already seen this so you know how much fun it is.
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Old 10-21-2007, 05:13 PM   #990
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And now because it’s just so damn good, this film gets it’s own post away from the rabble I posted above.

12 Angry Men
This is one of those films where no matter what point it’s at, if I catch a bit of it I feel compelled to stay and watch the rest play out. It’s not often films can be so engrossing, especially one such as this. Almost all of the film plays out in real time and in one room, save for a couple of short scenes in the adjoining bathroom. It is in this room that twelve jurors must decide upon a verdict for a young man accused of murdering his father, with much incriminating evidence and testimony in favour of a guilty verdict that will sentence him to the chair.

Henry Fonda plays the one man who feels that there is enough reasonable doubt to vote not guilty and as he presents his arguments to his peers and pokes holes in the prosecutions case they begin to side with him, one by one. Each juror’s personality and reasons for their verdicts are drawn out over the course of the film and they never fall into cliché, although some veer close. It’s a testament to the performances of all twelve actors that they are all memorable even when their names aren’t revealed and all we have as an audience to refer to them by is a number.

Then there’s the direction. The first scene when the jury has adjourned is one long take that introduces us to all of them as they make small talk, discuss the case and move around the room before they sit down to business. I’ve a soft spot for long takes where the camera isn’t static and is very much a presence in the scene, so those that appear early on in this film always make me smile. There’s also the much acclaimed gradual change in lens and focus as the film goes on, slowly making the walls of the room close in on these men as tensions run high and the oppressive heat gives way to a rainstorm outside.

There are also some genuinely exciting moments, which I’ll try not to spoil. But Fonda’s rebuttal as to the uniqueness of the murder weapon is classic and the recreation of the stabbing is as tense as any other scene you may care to name, as well as being beautifully acted out by Fonda and Lee J Cobb. Special mention must also go the final, sobbing verdict of “not guilty,” it’s a powerful climax.

Another thing that I love about this film is the fact that Henry Fonda is not trying to persuade the others that the boy is guilty, instead he is trying to show how he was not proven guilty and there is reasonable doubt in all of the prosecution’s evidence. By the end of the film we are no wiser as to whether or not the boy did or didn’t do it and we only ever see his face as the jury file out of the court in the opening. But that’s not the point. I’m not the biggest expert on American law but it essentially boils down to ‘innocent until proven guilty’, whilst leaving personal prejudice at the door (another great moment towards the end of the film).

Overall, this is a great film and one of my favourites. You can be sure that it will feature on my 1950s list when we get that far and hopefully it’ll pop up on some of yours too. If you haven’t seen this yet and as such are not in a position to include it on that list, then watch it. SOON!
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