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Old 10-28-2010, 10:17 AM   #16
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Celebrity culture and reality TV is quite different than traditional escapism into TV land. Everyone likes to get lost in a good book or cop drama. We've developed a real mean streak as a media-consuming society quite recently, though, kind of hearkening back to the circus side shows of days gone by.
That's for damn sure. No wonder we're spawning nasty bullies.

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Consider, too, the sharkfest that is celebrity gossip culture, from tabloid magazines to TV shows and harsh blogs. The target audience for this—and the targets of its mean-spiritedness—is predominantly women. Sure, male stars get their share of ridicule, but mainly it’s the Kardashians and their love lives, Heidi Montag and her plastic surgeries, or the ongoing Chernobyl-like meltdown of Lindsay Lohan. That this is happening at precisely the same time that women have more opportunities, power and freedom than ever before is no coincidence, says Simmons. “Young women are a lot more open now about expressing their appetites for sex, food and fun,” Simmons says. “The reason there is so much anxiety and ambivalence toward them is because they violate conventional rules of feminity.” There’s not that much difference between trashing Miley Cyrus for a risqué stage performance, she says, and shaming a girl in your dorm, office or circle of friends for being promiscuous.
FEMALE BULLYING - Flare.com


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I wonder why it's okay to write an article slamming entertainment that glorifies overly thin girls, but not an article slamming entertainment that glorifies overly fat girls. Do you guys think you'd be downplaying the health concern angle if we were talking about an article on super thin runway models or magazine covergirls?
It's not ok to glorify unhealthy body images in entertainment.

It's especially not ok is to slam the dignity and humanity of those who struggle with both extremes.

Maura Kelly didn't write a blog post to open a worthy discussion about a serious and complex public health issue and how it should be handled in the world of entertainment.

She used that as an excuse to open a nasty tirade about her offended sense of aesthetics. And if that wasn't enough, she threw in a condescending bit on proper diet and exercise.

Then a forced, half-assed, explain-y "apology".
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:31 AM   #17
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But it's not always genetics or natural. Many women have to fight very hard against their genetics to stay slim and toned and be healthy. It's like saying "overweight people should just eat less and exercise". It's never that simple or that easy, either way you go. Many people that are thin and fit are not naturally that way.

That is true. Especially as we get older.

My point was that I don't view slender women as automatically having an "eating disorder." It is easier for some of us to be slender, when everyone in our families are the same way. Genetics does play a role in this, just llike lifestyle. I understand it is hard to work to be physically fit, something we have to work at everyday. I know it is tough for me. But, I stick with it.
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:35 AM   #18
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I've been trying to be more aware of not making comments about people who appear "too thin" (and let's face it, it's almost always women getting the fat-shaming or "eat a sandwich" comments, isn't it?).

Because it's not any of our effing business, and none of us are The Body Police.
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:39 AM   #19
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I've been trying to be more aware of not making comments about people who appear "too thin" (and let's face it, it's almost always women getting the fat-shaming or "eat a sandwich" comments, isn't it?).

Because it's not any of our effing business, and none of us are The Body Police.

Bravo!
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Old 10-28-2010, 12:10 PM   #20
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:35 PM   #21
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I've never seen the show but according to this article (the WSJ) the show is not glorifying the overweight couple, according to this it seems as if it's mocking them. It's not just the girl who is overweight, it's the guy too. That's the reason she doesn't want to see them making out.

I have yet to see a current tv show that "glorifies" overweight people in any way, shape, or form. Maybe there are some, I don't watch every show. Thin people are glorified as the standard, and as if no overweight people exist in the alternate tv universe..unless of course it's a show like Biggest Loser et al. So I see nothing wrong with pointing out that difference.

Good thing Roseanne and her husband didn't make out all that much, not that I can remember.
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:36 PM   #22
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I've never seen the show but according to this article the show is not glorifying the overweight couple, according to this it seems as if it's mocking them. It's not just the girl who is overweight, it's the guy too. That's the reason she doesn't want to see them making out.
It's my understand that she'd never even seen the show before being told to write about it.

You know, as someone said on another forum, it's 2010. It's not like it's all that difficult to find an episode or two to watch, or even parts of it.
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:38 PM   #23
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The Body Police.
That sounds like the worst nightmare of one particular poster in FYM.
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:40 PM   #24
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Ha!
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:41 PM   #25
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It's my understand that she'd never even seen the show before being told to write about it.
Apparently that didn't matter. Overweight people + making out (or doing anything else, as she says) =disgust. Easy article She just read the CNN article, I guess.

http://theclicker.todayshow.com/_new...y-fatties-post

“Mike & Molly” creator Mark Roberts was taken aback after reading the Marie Claire post that left the Internet abuzz about one blogger’s anti-“fatties” stance.

In an interview with Fancast.com, Roberts reacted to writer Maura Kelly’s claim that she’d be “grossed out” to see the sitcom’s stars kiss (or do anything else for that matter), describing it as “something you would hear one of the really stupid girls say in a high school cafeteria.”

While he might have expected it back in his high school days, Roberts certainly didn’t anticipate such a fat-phobic screed from a grown up. Still, he knows Kelly isn’t the only one who sees size before talent, and that’s the bigger battle.

“The shocking thing is we live in this a society where this was an issue,” Roberts told the Hollywood Reporter. “Jackie Gleason would never get on TV now because he's a large man who drank on TV. We've taken steps backward under the guise of what's healthy. Almost everybody I know struggles with something -- whether it’s their weight or alcohol or temper. To stand in judgment of somebody — especially when you're breaking it down to just the esthetic — it just makes me sad ... wow that makes me sound much more upset than I really am. But I am un-friending that woman on Facebook.”
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:31 PM   #26
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Fat People Exist - A Vote in Favor of More Diverse Bodies on TV - Marie Claire

Yes, Fat People Exist: A Vote in Favor of More Diverse Bodies on TV
October 27, 2010 2:20 PM by Lesley Kinzel

This is the first of a series of counterpoint posts to blogger Maura Kelly's opinion piece. -Ed's Note

There aren’t many people on television who look like me. Odds are good that if you’re built like the majority of people in the US today, there aren’t many people on television who look like you either. Just for the moment, let’s set aside the ubiquitous argument that obesity is a heretofore-unknown fifth flabby horseman of the fatapocalypse. Let’s also postpone the inevitable observation that there are other problems in the world of greater relative importance than what kinds of people we get to see on American television. This is an issue worth discussing, and I’m going to tell you why.

Last month, CBS debuted a new sitcom called Mike & Molly. The show has been promoted as the story of two “normal” people meeting and falling in love. The thing is, Mike and Molly aren’t normal, at least not in the narrow universe that television depicts. Mike and Molly are fat.

Now, Mike & Molly is not a great TV show. In fact I would call it a terrible TV show, but I have this annoying habit of expecting sitcoms to be funny. That said, Mike & Molly is important because it is currently the only series on television featuring characters and actors who look like me, and like people I know and love. Oh, but this is not a matter of “glorifying” obesity. Glorifying obesity would take multiple TV shows depicting fat folks riding unicorns and devouring warm pies whilst counting the bags of money they’ve gained from being fat. Indeed, if simply putting fat people on television was enough to “glorify” obesity, then The Biggest Loser should have done the trick years ago. It hasn’t, because The Biggest Loser is a show built on the humiliation and punishment (self-inflicted or otherwise) of fat people. When we say that putting fat people on television will “glorify” their bodies, what we really mean is that we are uncomfortable giving fat people any attention that is not overtly negative. Because fat people need to be told: don’t be fat. Being fat means you are not entitled to a normal life. Being fat means you are not entitled to love. Being fat means you are not entitled to humanity, much less dignity.

What Mike & Molly does right is portray fat people as sympathetic individuals, as capable of falling in love and being loved by someone else. It’s a sharp contrast to weight-loss reality TV that focuses on the alleged tragedy of fatness, and more than that, Mike & Molly’s depiction is simply true: despite what you’ve heard, every day there are real-life fat people out in the world falling in love and flying to Paris and riding rollercoasters and feeling good. After all, your life does not need to stop just because your body does not look the way you think it should.

Unfortunately, where Mike & Molly fails is in its insistence on making the size of its title characters the most important thing about them, the axis around which their entire lives revolve. Real-life fat people have jobs and friends and hobbies and relationships and families and some of us have whole days that go by where we don’t really think about being fat. Where are those characters? Ideally, putting fat characters on television would not glorify obesity, but rather normalize it. And normalizing it is okay, because fat people exist. We work with you and take the train with you and we see you at the gym and in line at the grocery store, and we’re not always crying about being fat.

Arguing that fat characters should not be seen on television is making the statement that fat people do not have a right to be seen -- or even to exist -- in media or in life. It suggests that fat people should hide themselves away in shame and not burden the public with having to look at them; by extension, it suggests that fat people are less valuable individuals than thin people. This idea harms everyone: it makes fat people feel terrible about themselves, and it makes thin people terrified of becoming one of those disgusting fatties. Everyone’s humanity is lost in the equation.

Over the summer, there was another television series that depicted fat characters in a way that neither glorified nor condemned them: that series was Huge, a show set at a fat camp and featuring a nuanced set of individual stories and experiences, plus a wonderfully diverse cast. ABC Family has since declined to give Huge a second season, ostensibly as a result of insufficient ratings. It’s possible that people just aren’t ready for this kind of diversity yet; after all, there have been lots of underrepresented groups who were once absent from television screens and are now commonly seen. But that change didn’t happen overnight -- it happened because people who believe in showing life and humanity in all its stunning variety fought hard for that visibility. The world we all live in is truly astonishing, not to mention beautiful, in its diversity; our media, television included, should reflect that. No one should be left out. Not even the fatties.

Check out more of what Lesley Kinzel has to say on her blog at Fatshionista.com.
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:27 PM   #27
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Anyone here seen this show?

I do find it interesting that you can have a major-network romantic comedy starring two characters in Overeaters Anonymous (an eating-disorders program for compulsive overeaters, not people who'd 'just like to lose some weight'), whereas I can't imagine a similarly normalizing show about anorexics or bulimics.
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:59 PM   #28
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is this falling into the trap of dichotomous thinking ?


A person that is 50 pounds over recommended weight , is fairly common these days, and not necessarily at risk of body collapse or shut down.
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Old 10-28-2010, 04:39 PM   #29
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Sure, and not everyone who's underweight is anorexic or bulimic...maybe I'm misunderstanding your point? I'm talking about viewers'/others' attitudes towards characters'/individuals' relationships with food and their own body image, not how much the characters/individuals appear to weigh.

ETA: To put it another way--I was surprised to see that there's a sitcom centered on characters depicted as having disordered eating behavior, presenting them as ordinary people the audience can relate to (which, of course, they are). I cannot see this happening with anorexics or bulimics though.
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Old 10-28-2010, 05:03 PM   #30
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I think a bulimic / anorexic has a health risk more like a morbidly obese person than a fat person that chooses to join a self-help group like over-eaters anonymous.



ETA, something like 40-50 per cent of the country is over weight, what per cent do you think is bulimic? 2%

Who would the advertisers be? laxative companies, children's fashions?
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