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Old 04-09-2014, 02:26 PM   #361
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Good for him but, again, a day is coming when this won't be news. And that's a great, great thing.

espnW -- University of Massachusetts Minutemen starter Derrick Gordon openly smiling after decision to come out as gay
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Old 04-10-2014, 03:09 PM   #362
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Wonder when we'll see one in MLB and NHL.

Have at least one in: MLS, NBA, Div1 Football and NFL after the draft, Div1 Basketball, WNBA, NWSL.

And then...the EPL, Bundesliga, La Liga, etc?
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Old 04-10-2014, 06:07 PM   #363
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The NHL is really strong in the administrative sense (especially the Burke story).

However I can't imagine but think the locker room is a really mixed place, being that you've got all sorts of nationalities fresh off the boat, as well as the tough guy mentality.

Excited for when it comes though.
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Old 04-13-2014, 03:02 AM   #364
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Excited for when it comes though.
Really? Why? Simply curious.

Seems odd to me to be "excited" about such a thing.
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Old 04-13-2014, 09:39 AM   #365
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Oh excuse me for being excited about a society evolving into a slightly, ever so minutely better world where everyone doesn't operate on some hard ass, self important frequency of douchebag.

That would be strange to be excited about.
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Old 04-13-2014, 10:15 AM   #366
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I think a world in which people don't need to fear being stigmatized professionally because of their sexuality is pretty exciting. We have that, or closer to it, in a lot of regular professions now, but pro sports are still a place where men are reasonable to fear how coming out would affect their career.
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Old 04-13-2014, 10:47 AM   #367
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Apologies for going off there -- I can be cranky in the morning.

But yeah, I think it's pretty exciting knowing that the NHL could (and hopefully will, given the direction) be an open environment welcoming all to play.

Hockey is my favorite sport. Gay rights/homophobia/the lgbt community is probably my #1 issue.
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:50 PM   #368
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Struck down in Ohio, guys.

Particularly nice, since this issue, arguably, is what swung Ohio, and thus the presidency to W, in 2004.
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Old 04-15-2014, 12:32 AM   #369
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Struck down in Ohio, guys.

Particularly nice, since this issue, arguably, is what swung Ohio, and thus the presidency to W, in 2004.

It's incredible how much things have changed in the past ten years, isn't it? We're a much better country for it.
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Old 04-15-2014, 07:14 AM   #370
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Seems like things are starting to spin forward much faster than they have previously. Pretty exciting to imagine living in a world where nobody gives a damn whether you're straight or gay as it makes no difference anymore.
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:27 AM   #371
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Oh excuse me for being excited about a society evolving into a slightly, ever so minutely better world where everyone doesn't operate on some hard ass, self important frequency of douchebag.

That would be strange to be excited about.


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And if U2 EVER did Hawkmoon live....and the version from the Lovetown Tour, my uterus would leave my body and fling itself at Bono - for realz.
Don't worry baby, it's gonna be all right. Uncertainty can be a guiding light...
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Old 04-16-2014, 12:24 PM   #372
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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/ma....html?hp&_r=0#

Interesting article.
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Old 04-16-2014, 03:13 PM   #373
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Looks like the article is either an excerpt from or based on the author's latest book. Which takes, at least according to Andrew Sullivan, a very myopic and downright inaccurate reading of history:

Jo Becker’s Troubling Travesty Of Gay History « The Dish

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For Becker, until the still-obscure Griffin came on the scene, the movement for marriage equality was a cause “that for years had largely languished in obscurity.” I really don’t know how to address that statement, because it is so wrong, so myopic and so ignorant it beggars belief that a respectable journalist could actually put it in print. Obscurity? Is Becker even aware of the history of this struggle at all? Throughout the 1990s, marriage equality had roiled the political landscape, dominated the national debate at times, re-framed and re-branded the entire gay movement, achieved intellectual heft, and key legal breakthroughs, such as the landmark Hawaii case that vaulted the entire subject from an idea to a reality. The man who actually started that revolution was Dan Foley, a straight man from the ACLU, who filed the key lawsuit. Foley does not make Becker’s index. Why would he? If the revolution only began in 2008, he is irrelevant. The courage and clarity it took to strike that first blow is nothing for Becker compared with that of two straight men, David Boies and Ted Olson, and one gay man, Chad Griffin, who swooped into the movement at the last moment and who were, not accidentally, Becker’s key sources for the entire tall tale.

The intellectual foundation of the movement is also non-existent in Becker’s book – before, wait for it!, Ken Mehlman and Ted Olson brought Republican credibility to the movement. Yes, that’s her claim.

...

More staggeringly, the critical, indispensable role of Evan Wolfson in pioneering this cause is actually treated with active contempt in the book. He is ludicrously portrayed by Becker as an obstacle to change, a remnant of a previous generation, a man who had led the marriage movement nowhere. This is where the book becomes truly toxic and morally repellent. I’ve been a part of this movement for twenty-five years, either as an activist speaker/writer or as a close observer on this blog for the last decade and a half. What Becker writes about Evan and the movement is unconscionable, ignorant and profoundly wrong. Evan had the courage to create this movement, and empower it with legal rigor and strategy, when it was far, far less popular than it is now. Without him, quite simply, the movement would not exist for Griffin to now outrageously attempt to claim credit for. Yet this book sweeps Wolfson aside as an actual obstacle to progress because he was concerned that the Prop 8 case was a high-risk high-reward legal strategy that would not be the slam-dunk for national marriage equality that Boies and Olson believed it would be.

And here’s the thing: Evan was right about that.
As you can tell, Sullivan's a little fired up about it.
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Old 04-17-2014, 04:38 AM   #374
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I honestly didn't know about this drug. Thoughts?
Why Aren’t Gay Men On The Pill? « The Dish

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The Associated Press – about as mainstream as you can get – has an article out this week about a very marginalized medication:
It’s the Truvada conundrum: A drug hailed as a lifesaver for many people infected by HIV is at the heart of a rancorous debate among gay men, AIDS activists and health professionals over its potential for protecting uninfected men who engage in gay sex without using condoms.
Many doctors and activists see immense promise for such preventive use of Truvada, and are campaigning hard to raise awareness of it as a crucial step toward reducing new HIV infections, which now total about 50,000 a year in the U.S. Recent efforts range from think-tank forums and informational websites to a festive event at a New York City bar featuring popular drag queens.
Yet others — despite mounting evidence of Truvada’s effectiveness — say such efforts are reckless, tempting some condom users to abandon that layer of protection and exposing them to an array of other sexually transmitted infections aside from HIV. “If something comes along that’s better than condoms, I’m all for it, but Truvada is not that,” said Michael Weinstein, president of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation. “Let’s be honest: It’s a party drug.”
I have to say I’m aghast by that attempt to stigmatize – yes, stigmatize – a medication that could prevent countless men from being infected with HIV. Think about it: if it were 1990 and the news emerged that – just by taking one pill a day – you could avoid ever getting infected with HIV, do you think there would be any debate at all? There would be lines around the block for it, huge publicity campaigns to get the amazing news out, celebrations in the streets, and huge relief for anyone not infected with the virus. Fast forward a quarter century, and those taking this medication are actually demonized as “Truvada Whores“.
Whore? Why are some now channeling Rush Limbaugh’s sex-phobia? I mean: are women who are on the contraceptive pill “whores” as well? All they’re doing is protecting themselves from the consequences of sex in terms of pregnancy. And all gay men on Truvada are doing is protecting themselves from HIV. Why on earth would we want to prevent or marginalize that? As Peter Staley, one of the true heroes of ACT-UP, has put it:
It breaks my heart that the worst of HIV stigma comes from my own community: gay men.
Mine too. The reason, it appears, is that being free from the fear of HIV infection could lead gay men to have lots of sex again with lots of partners. (One study we have examining this did not bear this out.) But here’s some breaking news: for vast numbers of gay men, lots of sex is already the case. Now that HIV is not a death sentence but a chronic disease like diabetes, the terror is long gone. But the virus isn’t. And rates of infection remain stubbornly high, especially in this demographic. Because, well, men are men. Betting against their testosterone in a sub-population without women is a mug’s game. Add to this that fact that for many men – spoiler alert – condoms make sex less pleasurable, less intimate and less intense, and you have the current high rates of infection. Given where we are, we have a choice, it seems to me. We can either use our medical knowledge to prevent infections, or we can allow them to continue.
What about side-effects? Yes, they exist with Truvada, as with any drug. But this pill must be prescribed by a doctor who can monitor quickly for any early adverse reaction in the liver and end the drug if necessary. One possible effect on bone-density takes a very long time to occur and again can be monitored and the drug ended if that’s the case. And compared with the side-effects of getting infected and having to take the full spectrum of anti-HIV drugs? Let’s just say your liver prefers Truvada. What about getting people to take it every day? Yes, that’s vital – just like contraception. If you are not taking it regularly, and you get infected, there’s a chance that the virus could mutate in the presence of Truvada to foil similar drugs in a future cocktail. But since the Truvada regimen requires blood work every three months, the resistance is unlikely to go on for long. And there are, mercifully, plenty of other classes of anti-HIV drugs that can replace it in a cocktail if you go on to get infected. So, yes, it might not be the best option for a tiny minority. But for the vast majority? It’s a complete no-brainer.
Can gay men be relied upon to take a pill once a day? Please. Why would they be regarded as less capable of protecting themselves than millions of women? And the cost we have already incurred by not aggressively promoting this drug as a preventative is huge. I wrote about this option as far back as 2006, when it first appeared on the horizon. 400,000 people have been infected since then. Back in 2010, in a thread called “A Massive HIV Breakthrough“, I noted that the trials concluded that the pill was more than 90 percent effective. Truvada was subsequently approved by the FDA in 2012 and continued to have high rates of success in clinical trials. From another Dish thread last summer:
According to the C.D.C., when study results are adjusted to include only participants who took their pills most of the time, the protective effects are 92 percent for gay men, nearly 90 percent for couples in which only one partner is infected, 84 percent for heterosexual men and women, and about 70 percent for drug injectors.
Think of how that can change the dynamic in a sero-discordant couple where one man is negative and the other positive. Think of how it can also help end the barriers between HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay men, with far, far less chance of infecting one another. But, in a felicitous medical coincidence, it also raises the tantalizing prospect of wiping HIV out of the gay community in our lifetime.
If you’re my age and remember the horror and the trauma and the paralyzing terror of the plague, that is not something you can feel indifferent about. Here’s why it is now perhaps possible in ways that have never existed before. If all HIV-negative gay men are on Truvada, they cannot get infected with the virus. And if all HIV-positive gay men are on retrovirals, then they cannot effectively transmit the virus. Bingo! Epidemiologically, HIV is facing extinction. But is it true that those of us on anti-retrovirals with undetectable levels of virus in our blood and semen cannot infect others? Well, we just got pretty amazing news on that front. A two-year PARTNER study – with more than a thousand sero-different couples, gay and straight – found that no-one was infected with HIV. (The results are available on aidsmap here.)
The bottom line: if we can get a critical mass of gay men on either Truvada or retrovirals, we could soon reach a tipping point in which this virus could be wiped out in a generation.
When we are still having 50,000 infections a year – and gay men remain a resiliently vulnerable population – this should be an urgent goal. We have a chance our predecessors long dreamed of: to have great and enjoyable sex lives without this paralyzing fear and this dehumanizing stigma. We owe it to them and to ourselves to do all we can to make this scenario possible.
Why on earth are we hesitating?
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Old 04-17-2014, 12:40 PM   #375
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It's a big current discussion within what might be known as "the gay community."

It's both complex, and simple.
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Old 04-17-2014, 03:19 PM   #376
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best article of the week:

Quote:
Book: Lawyer who defended Calif. gay marriage ban plans daughter’s gay wedding

By Robert Barnes, Thursday, April 17, 12:00 PM

The conservative lawyer who defended California’s ban on gay marriage at the Supreme Court is at work on another project: planning his daughter’s upcoming same-sex wedding ceremony.

Charles J. Cooper, a former top official in the Reagan Justice Department and onetime “Republican lawyer of the year,” learned of his daughter’s sexual orientation during the legal battle over California’s Proposition 8, according to journalist Jo Becker’s soon-to-be-released book chronicling the movement to legalize same-sex marriage.

Ashley Lininger became engaged to a woman identified in the book only as Casey just after the Supreme Court accepted the Proposition 8 case in December 2012. Cooper, a noted Supreme Court practitioner, argued the case in March 2013.

The court ruled against Cooper’s clients, saying they did not have legal standing to challenge a federal district judge’s ruling that the ban was unconstitutional. Same-sex marriages then resumed in the nation’s most populous state.

In its limited ruling, the court sidestepped Cooper’s argument that there is no constitutional right to same-sex marriage and that decisions about whether to allow such unions should be left to the states and voters.

Cooper told Becker that he did not think it appropriate to comment on how he would vote on the issue should he have the opportunity.

“What I will say only is that my views evolve on issues of this kind the same way as other people’s do, and how I view this down the road may not be the way I view it now, or how I viewed it 10 years ago,” Cooper is quoted as saying.

Cooper joins a list of prominent Republicans — former vice president Dick Cheney and Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio among them — with children whose interests are at odds with party orthodoxy on gay marriage.

Becker wrote that Cooper and his daughter spent hours discussing the case while it was ongoing and disagreed about Cooper’s view that states had reason to enshrine the traditional definition of marriage in their constitutions and withhold the right from same-sex couples.

“I think the most upset I got was being called an ‘experiment’ that people deserved to see the outcome of before accepting,” Becker quoted Lininger as saying. “It just made me feel — alien, I guess.”

Lininger lives in Massachusetts, the first state to legalize same-sex marriage and now one of 17, in addition to the District of Columbia, where the unions are legal. She did not want to be interviewed for this story. Cooper said the same, although he offered a statement:

“My family is typical of families all across America. We love each other; we stand up for each other; and we pray for, and rejoice in, each other’s happiness. My daughter Ashley’s path in life has led her to happiness with a lovely young woman named Casey, and our family and Casey’s family are looking forward to celebrating their marriage in just a few weeks.”

He added: “As Becker reports in her book, I told Ashley that what matters most is that I love her and she loves me.”

In the book, Cooper said he left it up to his daughter — he married her mother, Debbie, when the girl was 7 and always refers to her as his daughter — whether she wanted to go public with her engagement during the litigation.

Although it might have made the point that personal concerns are different from questions of policy, Cooper said he was relieved she decided on privacy.

“I didn’t want, and I didn’t think she wanted, for her and Casey to suddenly become the most famous lesbians in America,” Cooper told Becker. “But can you imagine how riveting it would have been if at the oral argument I disclosed this? I kind of personified what I was arguing.”

Becker is an investigative reporter for The New York Times who won a Pulitzer Prize for national reporting when she worked for The Washington Post. For her book, “Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality,” she was given unfettered access to the legal team seeking to overturn Proposition 8 — the odd-couple team of Republican Theodore Olson and Democrat David Boies — as well as the organization American Foundation for Equal Rights, which was formed to bring a case to the Supreme Court to recognize a constitutional right for same-sex couples to marry.

She did not have the same access to the legal teams defending Proposition 8 and the companion case that challenged the federal Defense of Marriage Act. But she wrote that Cooper granted her hours of interviews and allowed her to tell the story of his family.

Cooper granted few media interviews during the years-long litigation and was criticized by some conservatives for not being vigorous enough in his defense of traditional marriage.

He was haunted throughout the proceedings by a comment he made when the Proposition 8 case was at trial before U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker. Walker asked Cooper how it would harm the state’s interest in encouraging heterosexual couples to marry and raise families if it also allowed same-sex couples to wed. “Your honor, my answer is, I don’t know. I don’t know,” Cooper eventually replied.

Cooper immediately regretted his words and spent the rest of the litigation trying to take them back. What he meant by the comment, he said, was that same-sex marriage was so new and untried — “an experiment” — that the answer was impossible to know.

Becker writes about how, through the years of litigation, the opposing lawyers and plaintiffs were tied together as the case moved through the process.

Cooper and Olson are old friends, usually part of the same elite conservative legal establishment. Cooper succeeded Olson as head of the Office of Legal Counsel in the Reagan Justice Department.

Cooper said in the book that he came to especially admire the lesbian couple who challenged Proposition 8, Kris Perry and Sandy Stier.

They returned the compliment in a statement about Cooper’s defense of Proposition 8 at the same time his daughter was planning to marry a woman.

“Some may find this contrast between public and private jarring, but in our opinion, loving an LGBT child unequivocally is the single most important thing any parent can do.”

The question of whether there is a constitutional right to marriage that states may not withhold from gay couples could return to the Supreme Court in time for its term beginning in October.

But it is not the Proposition 8 case that has been the impetus for an unbroken line of federal district court decisions that such bans are unconstitutional: The judges instead are relying on the court’s decision in the DOMA case, U.S. v. Windsor , that ordered the federal government to recognize same-sex marriages performed where they are legal.
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Old 04-17-2014, 03:30 PM   #377
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There could be a few different takeaways from that article
a good one for many of the frequent posters in this forum is that attacking and belittling others is not the best way ti win converts to your point of view.
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Old 04-17-2014, 03:55 PM   #378
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I get that he's saying his views have evolved over time, but it just strikes me, the whole "well, it's fine for my daughter, but no one else."

You see that come up with abortion as well. "I'm against abortion! ..... but can you help me find a doctor to help my 15 year old daughter take care of this little problem?"
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Old 04-17-2014, 05:55 PM   #379
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Quote:
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It's a big current discussion within what might be known as "the gay community."

It's both complex, and simple.
I hear that this is a discussion within the AIDS prevention community at large. My brother keeps up on it a bit and said that advocates have pretty much given up on trying to promote condoms in Africa, mostly not because attitudes are so intractable but because Western governments and NGOs work so hard against to keep them out of people's hands, because of the promiscuity associations.
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:11 PM   #380
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i can only really speak for the gay male community (and really can't do that), but there are some who view this as a way for big Pharma to make a lot of money while encouraging unprotected sex, which could lead to the spread of other STDs and the emergence of resistant strands of HIV because some people don't take their other meds properly.

others believe that, in essence, this is no different than a woman remembering to take her birth control, and that total adherence to condom use over a lifetime is impossible to expect, and it's easier to remember to take a pill everyday than it is to always use a condom in the heat of the moment, and that this is the best way yet to reduce the transmission of HIV.

there's a lot to unpack here.
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