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Old 08-24-2002, 07:16 PM   #41
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Originally posted by Anthony
You can't get locked up for cussing in the UAE. Nor even in Saudi Arabia.

Ant.
I'm not allowed to even leave the house without black polyester covering me from head to toe in Saudi Arabia.

It's interesting that you're calling Bama a liar. Has he lied before? (Doubt it.) Perhaps individual experiences vary. Could be.
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Old 08-24-2002, 11:10 PM   #42
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Originally posted by CannibalisticArtist
look bama, it's not possible ok? it's not tacky on my part to question your friend's complaint legitamacy, but it is simply not possible and is frankly quite laughable.
if she did get arrested, in a bar, in the UAE, then she must've been doing something ELSE.
lying or exaggerating choose your option. it's a bar, drinking HAPPENS.
Why are you so defensive of thier system? How is it "not possible"? Were you there monitoring customer behavior and police activity at all of the bars? What about these splendid cases on the the liberal human rights organization Amnesty International's website?

Freedom of Press, or the lack thereof...
In September 2000, an unidentified individual claiming to represent the Ministry of Information reportedly contacted newspapers, including al-Khaleej, and television shows in the UAE, informing them that approximately 15 presenters and writers could no longer appear in their respective media. This alleged ban appeared to remain in force at the end of 2001.

Freedom of Speech/Religion (ha ha)
In March, three US nationals were arrested in Dubai for promoting Christianity by distributing Christian religious materials on busy streets. They were released on bail in early April, and press reports of 11 April quoted US embassy sources stating that all three had been deported. (Dirty Americans probably deserved it!)

Freedom to Not be FLOGGED When You Transcend Boundaries In Marriage
Elie Dib Ghaleb, a 30 year-old Christian Lebanese national has been sentenced to 39 lashes and one years' imprisonment reportedly solely for having married Mona, a Muslim woman from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). His ordeal began on 5 December 1995 when police went to the Intercontinental Hotel in al-'Ain in Abu Dhabi, where he worked as a restaurant manager, took him to his residence and searched for his marriage certificate. When they found it they arrested him. He was detained until 29 October 1996 when a Shari'a court in al-'Ain tried and sentenced him allegedly solely because of his marriage, as a Christian, to Mona.

Elie Dib Ghaleb has been working in the UAE, where he met Mona, since 1988. In June 1995 they were married in Lebanon. Subsequently, Elie Dib Ghaleb went back to his work in the UAE, while Mona returned to the United States of America to complete her business studies at Francis Marion University in Florence, South California.

Elie Dib Ghaleb is reported to have been beaten a number of times since his arrest. He is also alleged to have been flogged many times after investigation with him by police in al-'Ain. He is said to be suffering from high blood pressure, for which he was hospitalized twice for treatment.

Under Shari'a (Islamic) law, in force in the UAE, a Muslim woman is not allowed to marry a non-Muslim man unless he converts to Islam. Such marriage under Shari'a in the UAE is considered null and void, and the parties may be subject to punishment such as imprisonment or flogging for fornication.

In April 1996 Amnesty International wrote to the UAE authorities expressing concern at the detention of Elie Dib Ghaleb and seeking clarification as to the exact reason for his arrest and detention. To date, no response has been received. The organization issued urgent appeals calling on the UAE authorities to immediately and unconditionally release Elie Dib Ghaleb, as he has been imprisoned solely on religious grounds, and commute the sentence of flogging. The authorities have not officially responded and the case was reportedly referred to the office of the UAE President, Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al-Nahyan, for a final decision. Some reports suggest that Elie Dib Ghaleb expressed his intent to convert to Islam and such a measure would save him from the punishment to which he has been sentenced.

Amnesty International considers that the imprisonment and the sentence of flogging passed on Elie Dib Ghaleb for having married Mona to be a grave violation of his right freely to hold and express his beliefs and to be free from discrimination by reason of religion. Amnesty International considers him to be a prisoner of conscience imprisoned solely on religious grounds and has been calling for his immediate and unconditional release. Elie Dib Ghaleb has spent over a year in prison and at the time of writing he remained held at al-'Ain Central Prison. No information was available on whether the sentence of flogging has been carried out.

Amnesty International is also concerned at reports that Elie Dib Ghaleb was beaten in prison, and urges the authorities to investigate these reports and bring to justice anyone found responsible. It also calls on the authorities to end the use of flogging as a judicial punishment, which it considers to be cruel, inhuman and degrading.

(Wow, maybe I should have posted this one in the religious conversions/marriage thread! I mus admit that I do feel guilty; getting arrested for cussing in a bar is nothing compared to being imrpisoned for a year and flogged for marrying someone of a different religion and not converting to her religion. I guess he was just a dirty infidel.)

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Old 08-25-2002, 02:55 AM   #43
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thanks for the general knowledge cut & paste bama.

Quote:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



AI-index: AMR 51/051/2002 28/03/2002

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Public Statement
28 March 2002
AI Index AMR 51/051/2002 - News Service Nr. 57

USA: Amnesty International calls for investigation on alleged beating of inmate in Kentucky jail (his fault for commiting a crime!!111)


Amnesty International is calling on the Kentucky authorities to hold a full, impartial inquiry into the alleged beating of Chad Boggess in the Boyd County Detention Center ten days ago. The incident left him with multiple injuries and in a coma on a life support machine.

While the full facts are not yet known, other inmates have alleged witnessing guards and police officers kicking and stomping on Burgess and beating him with night sticks in a sustained attack during the night of 16-17 March. They also claim inmates were allowed to join in at one point.

The allegations are deeply disturbing and suggest that Boggess may have been subjected to torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment in gross violation of international standards and treaties to which the US is a party. International standards require that whenever there is ground for believing that such treatment may have occurred, the authorities must proceed to a full, impartial inquiry.

Amnesty International is concerned by allegations that Boggess was sprayed with large quantities of mace or pepper spray, and that he may have been hogtied -- a dangerous form of restraint which has been banned by many police departments.

The organization welcomes reports that the FBI and state and local police have opened criminal investigations into the incident, and is urging that these investigations be conducted with the utmost thoroughness so that the full facts can be established and those responsible for any wrongdoing brought to justice.

Amnesty International is also calling on the state corrections department -- which oversees jails -- to conduct an inquiry into all the circumstances of what happened. Such an inquiry should include a review of what precipitated the incident; who was responsible for authorizing or supervising the use of force; what quantities of chemical spray were used; and a review of the adequacy of jail policies and procedures on the use of force and restraints.

The organization expressed shock at the allegations that guards and even inmates took part in a sustained beating -- which, if confirmed, would suggest not only criminal wrongdoing but a serious breakdown in standards and supervision at the jail -- and urged the authorities to make it clear that any use of excessive force and ill-treatment by guards will not be tolerated. It also called for international standards on the use of force to be incoporated into police guidelines and training.


AI Index: AMR 51/103/2002 (Public)
News Service No: 110
28 June 2002

USA: Time to rethink the death penalty - 30 years after landmark court ruling (ha ha at least we kill them mercifully, not like those dirty a-rabs and their stoning!!11!!)

Politicians in the United States should use the 30th anniversary of Furman v Georgia, the Supreme Court decision which overturned the country's capital laws, to reflect upon the USA's increasingly isolated position on the death penalty and to begin to work towards its abolition, Amnesty International said today.

"US officials should be troubled by the damage that the death penalty inflicts on their country's reputation in an increasingly abolitionist world", Amnesty International said. "The failure of their predecessors to seize the opportunity presented by the Furman decision to lead their country away from judicial killing is coming home to roost 30 years on".

The Furman v Georgia ruling was handed down on 29 June 1972. It found that the arbitrary manner in which the death penalty was being applied rendered it unconstitutional. Although only two of the Justices found the death penalty unconstitutional per se, the ruling nevertheless overturned existing death sentences. However, instead of progressing towards abolition, the country's legislators set about rewriting their capital statutes. In 1976, the US Supreme Court upheld the new laws, and executions resumed in 1977 with the killing of Gary Gilmore in Utah.

"Nearly 800 executions later, the evidence continues to mount that the capital justice system is tainted by arbitrariness, discrimination and error", Amnesty International continued. "At the same time, the number of countries that have abolished the death penalty in law or practice has risen to 111, a clear majority worldwide".

The USA frequently violates international minimum safeguards in its pursuit of the death penalty, including in its use against people whose guilt remains in doubt; defendants denied their right to adequate legal representation; the mentally impaired; foreign nationals denied their consular rights; and child offenders -- those under 18 at the time of their crimes.

Last week the US Supreme Court finally ruled that the execution of people with mental retardation violates the Constitution. The ruling came 13 years after a resolution was adopted at the United Nations calling on all retentionist countries to abolish such use of the death penalty.

"US officials frequently promote their country as the world's most progressive force for human rights", Amnesty International said. "Their continuing failure to put an end to the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment starkly gives the lie to that claim".

Since judicial killing resumed in the USA in January 1977, 784 men and women have been put to death nationwide. More than 500 of these executions have occurred since 1995.

See: USA: Wrong Turn - An international perspective on the 30th anniversary of Furman v. Georgia (AMR 51/102/2002, 28 June 2002), available on www.amnesty.org

http://web.amnesty.org/ai.nsf/recent/amr511022002

USA: Stop discriminating against Haitian asylum-seekers (GO BACK TO YOUR COUNTRY!! LOL)


Amnesty International today expressed concern that asylum-seekers from Haiti are being subject, as a matter of course, to indefinite detention in the USA without adequate opportunity to present their claims for asylum and in conditions which are unsuitable for refugees.

Amnesty International is also disturbed at reports that a substantial number of Haitian asylum-seekers who have shown a credible fear of persecution in Haiti have been ordered deported. The organization fears that more Haitian asylum-seekers may face the same fate.

A lawsuit, filed in mid-March by immigration attorneys and Haitian rights advocates on behalf of Haitian asylum seekers in Miami, Florida, alleges that the US government is discriminating against Haitian asylum seekers, including those who have shown they have a credible fear of persecution in Haiti, by continuing to detain them as their claims proceed, while refugees from other countries are released. Those whose claims are pending include a woman opposition activist who claims she was raped and beaten by a local political leader of the pro-government Lavalas party after she helped campaign for the opposition party.

The lawsuit describes how -- contrary to previous policy under which Haitian asylum seekers who had demonstrated a credible fear of persecution in Haiti were regularly released within a few days of arriving -- the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) is holding them for months in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions where they endure harsh treatment and abuse. It also claims that the process for dealing with Haitian asylum claims has been speeded up, depriving applicants of a full and fair opportunity to present their asylum claims, with many going without legal representation as a result. In addition, the lawsuit alleges that efforts to provide legal representation to Haitian asylum-seekers are being severely hampered at detention centres such as the Krome Processing Service Center near Miami and the Turner Guildford Knight Correctional Center (TGK), a maximum security jail in Miami.

Amnesty International is concerned at allegations that women detainees taken to TGK in Miami are suffering especially harsh treatment. This includes: verbal abuse and insults by guards; frequent cell "lockdowns" for hours at a time; and inadequate provision of food, medical care and exercise facilities.

In March, in responding to the lawsuit, the INS admitted that its new policy of detaining Haitian asylum seekers was to deter other Haitians from attempting to enter the USA and to avoid further risk-taking. International standards provide that asylum-seekers should not normally be detained, furthermore the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has recently stated that the detention of asylum seekers for deterrence purposes is contrary to international refugee law and that detention of asylum seekers based on national origin is discriminatory and would constitute arbitrary detention.

Amnesty International is calling on the US authorities to fully reinstate the government's previous policy regarding Haitian asylum-seekers; to ensure that all Haitian asylum-seekers have a full and fair opportunity to present their asylum claims; to take immediate steps to ensure the safety and well being of women asylum seekers at TGK; not to deport anyone who has shown a credible fear of persecution; and to find more suitable alternatives to housing asylum seekers than local jails.

Background
The new INS policy was put into place after 167 Haitians were rescued by the US Coast Guard from a boat in difficulties off the coast of Florida in December 2001. More than 270 Haitians with a credible fear of persecution in Haiti have been detained since December. While the INS recently released a small number of Haitian asylum seekers, announcing that it had amended its policy of non-release, Amnesty International understands that this amendment is very limited in that it will affect only a handful of Haitians who arrive in the USA by air (while the majority of Haitians arrive by boat). Moreover, the amended policy still requires Haitian asylum-seekers to complete excessive documentation not required of other groups seeking asylum. Haitians arriving by boat are reportedly still being detained without exception.




you still CANNOT get arrested for 'cussing' in UAE. your friend is still lying/exaggerating.
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Old 08-25-2002, 08:09 AM   #44
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In Michigan, a man was arrested for cussing loudly in front of women and children, in violation of a 100 year old state law that hadn't been enforced in decades.

He was also convicted, but the law and conviction were later declared unconstitutional.

America certainly has its "unfree" moments...but, at least, our court system was able to weed out this abuse.

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Old 08-25-2002, 08:22 AM   #45
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"I'm not allowed to even leave the house without black polyester covering me from head to toe in Saudi Arabia.

It's interesting that you're calling Bama a liar. Has he lied before? (Doubt it.) Perhaps individual experiences vary. Could be."

Well, no. It isn't so very interesting because I'm not calling Bama a liar at all. I'm just wondering where he got his facts from. Also, the distinction between a person who is a liar and someone who tells an incidental lie is a rather huge one. How you can correlate the two from one sentence is very interesting.

As for the Saudi Arabian thing, you are quite right. My mother was indeed forced to wear such apparel. However, that was ages ago in the late 80s. I confess I do NOT know how things work now, but I have had people come back to me and tell me that young teenage girls get to wear what they wish. Now, that is.

I agree, individual experiences DO vary. However, I lived in Kuwait for seven years, the UAE for two years, as well as Bahrain and Qatar. Kuwait and UAE paticularly stick out for me because I was a teenager there. Primarily, I have never come across such law that you can get arrested for cussing in either of those countries, indeed, most people swear all the time. Not to even mention the police, just like any other country. What I do remember, is spending every weekend out with my friends out on the street (with the help of alchohol in the UAE) being extremely roudy and doing what most tennagers do at that age, in a crowded street with the occasional police passing by, and of course, not ever having one single brush with the law. This wasn't purely out of our own individual experiences, but also because we had no fear in doing what we were doing because it simply didn't happen; no one got arrested for something as trivial as that. I'm sorry, but if I have to choose between my considerable personal experience with what Bama heard from someone else, I choose the former.

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Old 08-25-2002, 09:08 AM   #46
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Random ponderings...

Are there different standards for Muslims and non-Muslims in a Muslim nation? I heard that even the Taliban didn't necessarily expect a non-Muslim female journalist to have to wear the burqa.
Any comments? Because I really don't know.

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Old 08-25-2002, 02:36 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally posted by melon
Random ponderings...

Are there different standards for Muslims and non-Muslims in a Muslim nation? I heard that even the Taliban didn't necessarily expect a non-Muslim female journalist to have to wear the burqa.
Any comments? Because I really don't know.

Melon
My memory is a bit hazy on this, but I believe that when Afghanistan and Pakistan were playing a friendly soccer match, a Taliban official had the Pakistan soccer team arrested and their heads shaved for the crime of wearing shorts.

The Taliban official was later dismissed from his position.

So who knows.
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Old 08-25-2002, 03:06 PM   #48
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melon, in most middle eastern countries, non-muslim arabs are still held by the same standards as muslim arabs, however foreigners, particularly english and american expats, are not, and are usually free to do what they are used to doing, e.g drinking, dressing the same etc

from my day-to day experiences in kuwait (most experience), KSA, UAE, bahrain it goes like this:
least constricting to most:

UAE-different laws exist in different states, there are 6 states total. the sharia laws that bama was spouting about in amnesty, exists only in the more rural states like al-ain and ajman but not in the metroplitan cities such dubai or abu dahbi. in the cities, you can drink, go to the bar/disco, go to the beach, wear whatever you want. freedom of speech is tolerated to a certain level. there is a high level of expatriats living there.

bahrain-a little more conservative in terms of dress, you can still wear what you want but you will get odd looks if you, say, walk around the street in a bathing suit. i'm not sure about freedoms of speech and journalism there.hotels have bars and discos. so many english expats live there, that they actually have english style gardens set up. bahrain has a normal court system and probably follows a british set up.

kuwait-kuwait is basically a big city surrounded by a small suburban part with a beech and desert. drink is legal to own but not to sell which makes the black market for it thrive. almost 90% of kuwait consumes alcohol since only 40% of the people are actually kuwaiti. there are no street bars/ clubs etc, but people have turned their houses/chalets/farms into entertainment complexes filled with anything from alcohol to prostitution and finding a place to drink/party is not hard at all, especially if you are foreign. dress code is similar to bahrain. the press have almost total freedom which is quite odd since they have more freedom than more westernised places like UAE. they basically slag the govt every chance they get! kuwait has also excellent, unedited tv cable choices and there is a satellite on almost every house. kuwait also has a normal law system and follow a french set up a believe! ODD!
in kuwait you can choose different kinds of education too, including american, english, french, indian and iranian schools.

KSA- expats can only drink/party/dress down on specific enclosed compounds. non of these things are allowed in KSA because they specifically target such things with special 'decency' police as they call it. KSA follows strict islamic rule and law, and outside the compounds, everything is enforced and no one is cut any slack so EVERYBODY has to abide by their strict rules. they also censor tv, video, internet, limit the sales of satellites and cable, no free speech or press particularly on issues of religion and government. but what do you expect of a country that houses the single most important and holy islamic location? sharia and islamic laws apply in KSA.

common sense applies to all these places.
after all, i wouldn't come to the US and ask to hunt endangered species then bitch at the lack of freedom when i get denied.(you can hunt anything in almost all middle eastern countries, they all lack decent animal laws which is a shame.)
again freedom is SUBJECTIVE thing. being able to own a gun does not = freedom.
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Old 08-25-2002, 04:13 PM   #49
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CannibalisticArtist is quite accurate in all of his reports. Where did you live in these respective countries, CannibalisticArtist, just out of curiousity, as it seems like we've lived in the same countries.


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Old 08-25-2002, 05:30 PM   #50
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Anthony i grew up in kuwait, in faiha to be precise, and i have travelled to the gulf countries i mentioned with family and friends, as well as many middle-eastern countries. i have been to the UAE twice in which i lived in dubai and abu dahbi, but i also visited sharja (across the bridge ) ajman and the themepark in al ain.
bahrain i didn't stay for long, and KSA i only stayed there a day(it was more than enough! ) and got my info from my father, he's been there many times.
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Old 08-25-2002, 06:08 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally posted by CannibalisticArtist
UAE-different laws exist in different states, there are 6 states total. the sharia laws that bama was spouting about in amnesty, exists only in the more rural states like al-ain and ajman but not in the metroplitan cities such dubai or abu dahbi. in the cities, you can drink, go to the bar/disco, go to the beach, wear whatever you want. freedom of speech is tolerated to a certain level. there is a high level of expatriats living there.
CannibalisticArtist:

Please note that in the case of Elie Dib Ghaleb (the Palestinian Christian who married a Muslim bride), the arrest took place in Adu Dhabi, where he lived and worked.

Regarding the abuses which you posted in the U.S., I do not deny that those have occurred, nor do I deny that they should be investigated and corrected, if necessary. However, you absolutely deny that a woman was arrested for "swearing" in a bar in UAE, and instead blame her for being drunk or exaggerating. Great!

~U2Alabama
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Old 08-25-2002, 06:23 PM   #52
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The statements "swearing is legal in the United Arab Emirates" and "my friend was arrested in the United Arab Emirates" do not contradict each other. The officer who arrested Bama's friend could very well have been acting on his own.

Just my logical explanation for the supposed conflict here.
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Old 08-25-2002, 06:37 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally posted by Anthony
[B.

As for the Saudi Arabian thing, you are quite right. My mother was indeed forced to wear such apparel. However, that was ages ago in the late 80s. I confess I do NOT know how things work now, but I have had people come back to me and tell me that young teenage girls get to wear what they wish. Now, that is.


Ant. [/B]
I was in Saudi just before the bombing of Khobar Towers, and when downtown in the Bazzar I noticed all of the women were covered head to toe. They also were not allowed to make eye contact with us. I am not sure at which age they start this, but I doubt they allow their teenage girls to dress as they want, God forbid. Or should I say "Allah forbid" ? Whatever.



U2Bama, I believe your story and will not lower myself to calling your friend a liar.

I find it funny that people are executed for shoplifting but are allowed to use foul language in the streets. Of course, I am sure they are alowed to use whatever type of language they want if it is about the USA
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Old 08-25-2002, 07:26 PM   #54
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CannibalisticArtist;

Sounds like you had an awesome up-bringing. You said you were raised in faiha, when was this, though? (I'm just curious). Lol.

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Old 08-25-2002, 07:33 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally posted by speedracer
The statements "swearing is legal in the United Arab Emirates" and "my friend was arrested in the United Arab Emirates" do not contradict each other. The officer who arrested Bama's friend could very well have been acting on his own.

Just my logical explanation for the supposed conflict here.
makes sense. as opposed to the nonsensical "my friend was arrested in the United Arab Emirates" = "there is no freedom of speech in the UAE". i suspect there is more to this story than just aimless 'swearing' in a different language no less. the policeman had to have been arab. in arabic, 'damn' is not considered blashphemy nor swearing, especially not when said in english.
it wasn't a conflict, more of a thread hijack but now it seems we are back on track.

hijack again: Anthony i was in kuwait up until 1997. BTW the faiha area sucked .
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Old 08-25-2002, 07:38 PM   #56
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Damn it Just realized something.

This is very odd, I was looking at your name CannabilisticArtist when my cd (Boston elevation) suddenly jumped back form the end of 'walk on' to 'The Fly' where he says "every artist is a cannibal........"

Odder still, it was in the bazaar in Saudi that i mentioned earlier that a friend of mine (we were in a record shop) grabbed me and said "hey this is rare you should buy this"!!!!!!!!

I looked to see what he was talking about and he handed me an IMPORT copy of 'the Fly' single!

Of course I bought it and still have it!
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Old 08-25-2002, 07:40 PM   #57
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Yeah, I guess it did. I lived in Salmiya and Ahmadi. Did you ever go there? (I realise its a hijack, but this thread was hijacked ages ago...)


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Old 08-25-2002, 07:46 PM   #58
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that's a pretty cool coincindence z edge. i love that verse as you can tell . i first found about U2 in kwt when my brother bought a tape of AB with him from the US when he visited. several car trips later and i became hooked!
anthony- salmiya=everyday. what else is was there to during the weekdays? . i had a friend who lived in ahmadi but i didn't visit him very often. i'd just meet him...in salmiya!
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Old 08-25-2002, 11:04 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally posted by CannibalisticArtist

makes sense. as opposed to the nonsensical "my friend was arrested in the United Arab Emirates" = "there is no freedom of speech in the UAE". i suspect there is more to this story than just aimless 'swearing' in a different language no less. the policeman had to have been arab. in arabic, 'damn' is not considered blashphemy nor swearing, especially not when said in english.
it wasn't a conflict, more of a thread hijack but now it seems we are back on track.

hijack again: Anthony i was in kuwait up until 1997. BTW the faiha area sucked .
Of course, I meant to reconcile the statements "it is legal to swear in UAE" with "my friend was arrested for swearing in UAE," but you obviously understood that.
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Old 08-26-2002, 01:48 AM   #60
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I have no trust in our Government. I AGREE
I have no faith in the Constitution. I DISAGREE
I have grown to despise the man that I elected President. I HAVE ALWAYS DESPISED HIM
I have lost my faith in the Goodness of Humanity. I BEGAN AGREEING ABOUT 18 YEARS AGO (IM CURRENTLY 22 YEARS OLD)
I have lost my trust in America. SAME HERE
I pledge no Allegiance to any Flag. DITTO
I do not support the Military. I SUPPORT THE TROOPS, BUT DISTRUST THE OFFICIALS
I hate the Blind Followers of our Executive Leader. TELL ME ABOUT IT
I hate the Flag Worshippers. GEORGE CARLIN SAID IT BEST, SYMBOLS ARE FOR THE SYMBOL-MINDED
I hate the Corporations. THEY DO SOME GOOD, BUT DOES THAT MATTER? NO
I hate having Capitalism rammed down my Throat. ITS HARD, BUT I THINK ITS THE BEST SYSTEM AT THE CURRENT TIME.
I hate the Illusion of Democracy that everyone clings to. SMALL BRAINS WILL CLING TO ANYTHING.
I don't believe in the Illuminati. I DONT KNOW WHAT THIS IS.
I don't believe that the Planet is being run by Lizard People. YOU NEVER KNOW.
I don't believe the President is a Pawn of the Free Masons. YOU NEVER KNOW.
I don't believe I'm being spied on whenever I watch TV. YEAH, THATS A LITTLE FARFETCHED.
I don't believe the Government is tracking my every move. NEVER LET YOUR GUARD DOWN
I do believe that the Government is nothing more that a bunch of Greedy, Squabbling, Infantile, Corrupt White Men. AMEN, BROTHA
I believe the Country needs to take care of itself before dealing with Foreign Matters. TRUE
I believe Israel is in the wrong. THAT MAKES TWO OF US. NOW THE HARD PART IS CONVINCING EVERYONE ELSE.
I believe no good can possibly come of invading Iraq. MAYBE IN THE LONG RUN, BUT IT WILL INEVITABLY SCREW UP A LOT OF LIVES.
I hate the Government. WHICH ONE?
I hate most of the Citizens of this Once Great Nation. WHICH ONE? AMERICA OR BRAZIL. (LOL)
I hate the idea that it is the Duty of the United States to provide Freedom and Democracy to the world, when we have none for ourselves. GREAT LINE, CAN I USE IT SOMEDAY.
I hate the People who cannot see that I have every Right to say all this and still be American. NO, YOU BELONG IN PRISON AND FEED ONE MEAL A WEEK, YOU ANTI-SEMITE, UNEDUCATED, SADDAM LOVIN BASTARD. OOPS, THAT JUST KIND OF SLIPPED OUT. (LOL)
There are better, freer countries out there. AUSTRALIA, CANADA, GERMANY. LETS GO!
This is my home. I hate to see it like this. A--------MEN
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