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Old 03-22-2004, 03:40 PM   #1
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Warning to Boomspeed users

I know there are several others here besides me who have the pay Boomspeed accounts, have you seen this? If you do, look out!

I got an email (thought it was weird it ended up in the spam folder) labeled support@boomspeed.com. It told me that my boomspeed email account was being disabled in 3 days due to improper use. I thought, huh? I don't even use it much, what did I do? It told me the info I needed to fix it was in the attachment. I clicked on it, and thank goodness Yahoo has a virus filter! It said the attachment contained dangerous codes and that their RAV virus scanner had detected it and stopped me from opening it! I usually am not dumb enough to open any attachment from an unknown source, but they claimed to be boomspeed. I don't believe it now, I think it was a trick. I saw once here that someone said that admin@interference.com had sent them one and it turned out to be some kind of hacker thing. I guess that's what this is too. But anyway don't open the attachment claiming to be from boomspeed support! Now I think maybe that's why it got sent to spam, it wasn't really a legitimate thing. I'm going to email the real boomspeed and tell them about it.
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Old 03-22-2004, 03:49 PM   #2
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I have Boomspeed. Thanks for the warning!
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Old 03-22-2004, 03:52 PM   #3
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I got a strange email from someplace after I applied to a job. It said it was from this companies HR dept. It had an attachment. The email said "important news about the job you applied too...." I've applied to this company before and after I got that funny email and never had that happen. I just clicked the spam button and didn't open it.

The other day I got an email the other day from an "unknown sender." What the hell is that? I've never seen that before. Spam button again....
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Old 03-22-2004, 04:22 PM   #4
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That's what this says too, "important message" about your boomspeed account! I guess somebody's getting hold of business addresses and doing this stuff
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Old 03-22-2004, 08:26 PM   #5
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This is not just boomspeed involved in this. I got the same one in yahoo, and someone else I talked to did too. It looks legit and says they are from admin. and there is something wrong with your account, then same thing, click the attachment that is a virus. So it must be widespread, it could be in any email service, like it used Arw's potential employer's name. It might show up anywhere so everyone look out for it!
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Old 03-22-2004, 10:42 PM   #6
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I haven't received the Boomspeed e-mail, but I know that FJ did cuz she asked me if I got it too. I don't think she opened it, I think she was going to email the admins for boomspeed and ask if they sent it first.

I've gotten similar ones from ebay, but they're not viruses, they're emails to steal your user name and password for your ebay account. They, too, look very legit but I always forward them to spoof@ebay.com so that ebay can look into it and hopefully crack down on the b*stards doing this kind of sh*t. The ebay emails also have a sense of *urgency* to them... they say your account has been disabled during their maintenance or something like that and you have to reactivate it by clicking on the link and entering your ebay name and password.... so beware.
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Old 03-22-2004, 11:55 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by erised

I've gotten similar ones from ebay, but they're not viruses, they're emails to steal your user name and password for your ebay account. They, too, look very legit but I always forward them to spoof@ebay.com so that ebay can look into it and hopefully crack down on the b*stards doing this kind of sh*t. The ebay emails also have a sense of *urgency* to them... they say your account has been disabled during their maintenance or something like that and you have to reactivate it by clicking on the link and entering your ebay name and password.... so beware. [/B]

I got that email too!!!!!! several months ago. I read thru it several times and I even saved the email cuz I wasent sure if it was BS. Then a few weeks after I got the email I bid on something and I saw that my account was not disabled and i just went and deleted the bogus email.

I havent gotten the Boomspeed email yet.
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Old 03-23-2004, 09:33 AM   #8
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Thanks for that warning too Erised! There must be some way to stop those a-holes. If anyone is that good at computers couldn't they get a real job working with them and not do crooked stuff like this?
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Old 03-23-2004, 04:28 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by erised
I haven't received the Boomspeed e-mail, but I know that FJ did cuz she asked me if I got it too. I don't think she opened it, I think she was going to email the admins for boomspeed and ask if they sent it first.

I've gotten similar ones from ebay, but they're not viruses, they're emails to steal your user name and password for your ebay account. They, too, look very legit but I always forward them to spoof@ebay.com so that ebay can look into it and hopefully crack down on the b*stards doing this kind of sh*t. The ebay emails also have a sense of *urgency* to them... they say your account has been disabled during their maintenance or something like that and you have to reactivate it by clicking on the link and entering your ebay name and password.... so beware.
My sister got one of those from someone pretending to be from AOL too

Remember guys, legit organizations should never have to ask you for your username and password via e-mail. When you get an e-mail like that, it's probably a tip off it's a scam.
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Old 03-23-2004, 06:01 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by erised
I haven't received the Boomspeed e-mail, but I know that FJ did cuz she asked me if I got it too. I don't think she opened it, I think she was going to email the admins for boomspeed and ask if they sent it first.

I've gotten similar ones from ebay, but they're not viruses, they're emails to steal your user name and password for your ebay account. They, too, look very legit but I always forward them to spoof@ebay.com so that ebay can look into it and hopefully crack down on the b*stards doing this kind of sh*t. The ebay emails also have a sense of *urgency* to them... they say your account has been disabled during their maintenance or something like that and you have to reactivate it by clicking on the link and entering your ebay name and password.... so beware.
OMG, I just got one of those today. I didn't know it was a rip-off attempt. Thanks for telling me. Damn!
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Old 03-24-2004, 08:28 AM   #11
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Is that something that can hack your password without you giving it out? I know a guy who said that happened to him through AIM. He was on the buddy list of a girl whose account was hacked, and he got everyone's names and passwords! The hacker was able to go all over "being" them! They all had to get rid of their accounts and start over. I also know a lady whose bank account was wiped out through AOL. The hacker got the number of the debit card she used to pay her account with. Again, if these crooked people are so bright, GET A JOB in computers and stop ripping everyone off!
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Old 03-24-2004, 10:55 AM   #12
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This article was in the New York Times today...

Online Swindlers, Called ’Phishers,’ Lure Unwary

March 24, 2004
By SAUL HANSELL

Last year, EarthLink, the big Internet access provider,
went hunting for phishers.

It started a campaign to track down people who were sending
e-mail messages that pretended to be from EarthLink but
were actually fraudulent attempts to steal customers'
passwords, credit card numbers and other information. What
it found was that of the dozen or so people it could
clearly identify as engaged in the practice known as
phishing, more than half were under 18.

In its latest effort, EarthLink discovered a lot of
phishing e-mail messages coming from computers in Russia,
other East European countries and Asia. The e-mail
messages, and the Web sites they directed people to, were
becoming much more technically sophisticated.

"A year ago, there were some phishers out there, and it was
mostly teenagers and other people fooling around," said Les
Seagraves, EarthLink's chief privacy officer. "Now I think
we are moving to more criminal enterprise."

Phishing attacks are growing rapidly, impersonating
Internet service providers, online merchants and banks.
Government officials and private investigators say all
signs point to gangs of organized criminals - most likely
in Eastern Europe - as being behind many of the latest
efforts.

"Like any other black market, there is a stratification in
phishing," said Kevin E. Leininger, president of ICG of
Princeton, N.J., an investigative firm that has been hired
by banks to find those behind the attacks. "There are
people who are rank amateurs. And there are identity-theft
rings."

So far, the offenders have largely evaded the searches to
find them. One reason is that they often use computer
worms, spread from machine to machine, to send the
fraudulent e-mail - a technique that makes it almost
impossible to trace the source.

Like EarthLink's investigators, government authorities have
managed to track down a few individuals operating less
sophisticated ruses. The F.B.I. traced one crop of mass
e-mail messages pretending to be from the "AOL Billing
Center" to Helen Carr, 55, who ran the scheme from her home
in Akron, Ohio. (Ms. Carr pleaded guilty and was sentenced
in January to 46 months in prison.)

But federal investigators write off people like Ms. Carr as
small-time operators. "The kids in school and the old lady
in her basement make great copy," said Bruce A. Townsend,
deputy assistant director in the office of investigations
at the Secret Service, which investigates cases of credit
card fraud. "But this has transformed into something done
by organized criminal groups."

In February, 282 cases of phishing e-mail messages were
reported to the Anti-Phishing Working Group, a coalition of
technology companies, financial institutions and law
enforcement agencies. That was up from 176 attacks in
January and 116 in December. Brightmail of San Francisco,
which filters e-mail for spam, identified 2.3 billion
phishing messages in February, 4 percent of the e-mail it
processed, compared with only 1 percent of its messages as
recently as September.

"Identity theft is the single greatest type of consumer
fraud," said Christopher A. Wray, an assistant attorney
general in charge of the criminal division of the Justice
Department, "and phishing is the identity theft du jour."

At this point, there are few sure ways for an Internet user
to tell if an e-mail message is legitimate. So experts
advise people to be extremely wary of providing any
confidential information in response to e-mail.

"The crooks are getting slicker, and the bogus Web sites
and e-mails are dangerously legitimate looking," Mr. Wray
said.

No one knows how much money has been stolen through
phishing schemes. Banks say it still seems relatively small
compared with other forms of fraud and theft, like using
stolen credit or debit cards.

One reason it is not easy to figure out how much money has
been lost is because many victims do not realize it when
they have been fleeced. Even those who find an unauthorized
charge on their credit card bills and bring this to the
attention of the issuers do not necessarily know that the
charge was caused by their response to a false e-mail
message.

"People think they are giving their credit card numbers to
AOL because there is a problem in their account," said Eric
A. Wenger, a lawyer for the Federal Trade Commission, which
has brought civil actions against several phishers. "If
they find out four weeks later there are unauthorized
charges on the credit card, it never occurs to them to
connect the two events."

Lisa Cook, a sales representative with Kraft Foods who
lives in Brookline, N.H., was one of the lucky ones who
discovered that she had been subject to phishing before she
was significantly harmed. Ms. Cook responded one morning,
before her first cup of coffee, to a message in her e-mail
in-box seemingly from PayPal, the electronic payment
service of eBay. It said she needed to update her account,
so she dutifully provided her credit card and Social
Security numbers, mother's maiden name and other
identifying information.

Luckily, she spotted a warning later the same day about
Internet scams. Ms. Cook placed a panicked call to PayPal,
which confirmed her fear that she had been phished.

She was able to cancel all her credit cards and change
passwords before she lost any money. But the experience
haunts her.

"It will always be in the back of my mind," she said. "I
worry that some day down the road, someone will take out a
mortgage using my information."

Phishing got its name a decade ago when America Online
charged users by the hour. Teenagers sent e-mail and
instant messages pretending to be AOL customer service
agents in order to fish - or phish - for account
identification and passwords they could use to stay online
at someone else's expense. After AOL switched to a flat
monthly rate, the same phishing methods were used to steal
credit card information.

These days, the same factors are driving all sorts of spam
in much greater amounts.

"It doesn't cost any money to go out and copy someone
else's Web page to make it look real," said John Curran, a
supervisory agent for the F.B.I. "And it doesn't cost any
money to spam the e-mail out to one million people."

The phisher's goal is to persuade a recipient that he has
received a legitimate message, which must be replied to
immediately.

As for motivation, phishers sometimes appeal to greed by
sending an e-mail message that promises the recipient a
prize, asking for a credit card number only to bill for
shipping costs. More often, they rely on fear.

"The initial hook is something alarming," Mr. Curran said.
"They tell you they will shut down your account or you have
been charged for child pornography. Once they get you in a
state where you are agitated or excited, they can elicit an
emotional response."

The open technology used in both e-mail and Web browsing
make it easy to create convincing fakes and difficult for
recipients to verify who is really behind them. Even people
with only modest technical skills can take graphic elements
from a legitimate Web site and make a credible copy. (Many
phishing attempts last year were riddled with typographical
errors and awkward language, but now it appears that most
phishers have brushed up on their English or hired
proofreaders.)

Phishers often create Internet addresses that closely
resemble legitimate ones. Some have used domains that
included "yahoo-billing.com" and "eBay-secure.com." How is
the typical user to know those are not real, but
"billing.yahoo.com" is?

In response, Microsoft has modified Internet Explorer, the
most popular Web browser, to make it harder to fool users
and it has more changes planned for the next browser update
planned for release this summer.

A few Internet companies are going further. EBay and
EarthLink have both developed toolbars that can be added to
Internet Explorer to warn users if they are looking at
known fraudulent sites.

But Howard Schmidt, a vice president for security at eBay,
acknowledged that these approaches - and eBay's frequent
warnings to its customers and PayPal's - have their limits.


"Technology can solve 60 percent of the problem," he said.
"Education and awareness can solve 20 percent, and no
matter how good the industry is, there will be people who
fall victims so 20 percent will have to be handled by law
enforcement."

But even the small-time phishers who have been caught show
how simple it is to use easily accessible high-technology
tools to fool people. In February, Alec Scott Papierniak,
20, a college student in Mankato, Minn., pleaded guilty to
wire fraud. He had sent people e-mail messages with a small
program attached that purported to be a "security update"
from PayPal. The program monitored the user's activity and
reported their PayPal user names and passwords back to Mr.
Papierniak.

Prosecutors say that at least 150 people installed the
software, enabling Mr. Papierniak to steal $35,000.

While most of those prosecuted so far for phishing have
been in the United States, eBay, working with the Secret
Service, has investigated a series of scams originating in
Romania. More than 100 people have been arrested by
Romanian authorities. One of them, Dan Marius Stefan,
convicted of stealing nearly $500,000 through phishing, is
now serving 30 months in a Romanian prison.

Mr. Stefan sent e-mail messages that appeared to come from
eBay to people who were unsuccessful auction bidders,
advising them of similar merchandise for sale at even
better prices. To purchase the goods, the message
recipients were told to provide bank account numbers and
passwords and then to wire money to an escrow site - a
fraudulent one - Mr. Stefan had set up.

The financial losses of most phishing victims, particularly
those subject to credit card fraud, often end up being
absorbed by banks and their insurance companies.

But the costs are real."We get 20,000 phone calls every
time one of those goes out, and it costs us 100 grand,"
said Garry Betty, EarthLink's chief executive. "I got so
mad one month when we had eight attacks," he said,
explaining that he is pressing his legal department to find
someone important to make an example of.

"We haven't found one yet," Mr. Betty added, "but before
2004 is over, I'm going to get one."

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/24/te...082fc8b031692a

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
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Old 03-24-2004, 11:02 AM   #13
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^ I've received the fake PayPal messages, too, that were mentioned in that article... so I hope everyone is careful with what info they give away through e-mail...

When in doubt, go to the company's web site (by manually typing in its URL in the web browser... never follow links in suspect e-mails) and look for more info on the e-mail, or e-mail the company first to ask if they sent the e-mail... ebay has a whole section on its site dedicated to member security and they have a lot of info on how to report fake e-mails or emails you think might be fake.
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Old 03-24-2004, 11:22 AM   #14
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The New York Times also had a sidebar story with tips for staying safe and avoiding being *had* by these called "phishers."

From the New York Times--March 24, 2004:

Here are some tips to avoid being victimized by e-mail messages and Web sites trying to steal personal and financial information:

NUMBERS Be wary of any e-mail message asking you to verify or re-enter account information that you have already given to an organization you do business with. Do not provide information that is supposed to be secret, like a PIN for an A.T.M. card. Think twice before entering credit card numbers for offers that appear too good to be true, like merchandise with an unusually low price or a contest that requires you to pay a small handling fee to receive a prize.

SUSPICIOUS LINKS If there is any reason to doubt the authenticity of an e-mail message, do not click on any link or button in the message. Instead, type the Internet address of the company into your browser, log in as you usually do, and examine your account information.

PROTECTION FEATURES Look for the padlock icon on the bottom of the browser window that indicates that the site is using security features meant to protect confidential information. If a site is asking for personal information and is not using this security method, it is suspect. But the padlock, in itself, is no assurance a site is legitimate. Phishers are increasingly learning how to use their own secure sessions.

REPORT PHISHING ATTEMPTS Do not hesitate to telephone a company to ask if an e-mail is legitimate. Let any organization being impersonated know of the scam and alert the Anti-Phishing Working Group at reportphishing@antiphishing.org, the Federal Trade Commission (UCE@FTC.GOV) and the F.B.I.'s Internet Crime Complaint Center (www.ic3.gov).

If you have any reason to suspect that you have inadvertently provided information to a phisher, contact your bank and credit card companies immediately. Also, change any online passwords that you may have revealed to the phishers. If you provided information that could be used for identity theft - like a Social Security number - contact the three major credit bureaus - Equifax (800-525-6285), Experian (888-397-3742) and Trans Union (800-680-7289) - to put a fraud warning on your credit file.
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Old 03-25-2004, 07:15 PM   #15
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Re: Warning to Boomspeed users

Quote:
Originally posted by U2Kitten
I know there are several others here besides me who have the pay Boomspeed accounts,
Sorry to get off topic: but how much is a boomspeed account again? Do they have a limit on how much you can store?

I got an e-mail from photobucket today saying that I was close to their bandwidth limit And snapfish freezes up everytime I try to upload something.
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Old 03-25-2004, 08:23 PM   #16
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Re: Re: Warning to Boomspeed users

Quote:
Originally posted by kellyahern


Sorry to get off topic: but how much is a boomspeed account again? Do they have a limit on how much you can store?

I got an e-mail from photobucket today saying that I was close to their bandwidth limit And snapfish freezes up everytime I try to upload something.
I think it's $6 per month (billed $18 every three months) for 100MB of space, plus now they give you a Web mail account too, I think.
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Old 03-26-2004, 01:11 PM   #17
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Yes that's what they do. I have never had a complaint about bandwidth from them since I've been paying, and I post large amount of pics, many of them large, all the time as you all can see They give you so much space even I haven't filled it up. I still have 32 MB to go out of my 100! You also get a spam free email account and a website, but I do not know how to make my website For the price it's a good deal.

I also have that fotki page which is the closest thing to a real website I can get. It has the advantage over boomspeed of giving you albums and thumbnails so you can see the pics you're posting, but they do shrink like snapfish. For $30 per year, you get UNLIMITED storage space and the right to post on message boards without any complaints about bandwidth. I am poor but I have sprung for these things and it has been worth it.
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Old 03-26-2004, 05:07 PM   #18
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Thanks erised and U2Kitten
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