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Old 11-23-2013, 08:57 AM   #21
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The Met is amazing. When I lived in New York this past summer, I spent a ton of time there.
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Old 11-23-2013, 11:15 AM   #22
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A few year's back - I had the chance to tour the British Museum. I felt like I could have spent years in that place...
Still the best museum I've ever been to, and home to several of the most significant archaeological finds ever. Everyone knows the Rosetta Stone, but things like the Sutton Hoo collection are arguably as important in terms of shedding light on a specific culture.

In terms of classical art, though, the best place I've seen is one you might not expect: the Archaeological Museum of Naples. On the outside, the building is covered in graffiti and trash is strewn all over the place. Inside, it is absolutely stunning. It has some pieces that any ancient history nerd would recognize immediately, like the only surviving bust of Scipio Africanus and the Alexander mosaic from Pompeii. It also housed my single favorite piece of ancient art: the flora mosaic from Herculeaneum. Seeing that in person was the highlight of that entire Italy trip for me.
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Old 11-23-2013, 11:32 AM   #23
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In terms of classical art, though, the best place I've seen is one you might not expect: the Archaeological Museum of Naples. On the outside, the building is covered in graffiti and trash is strewn all over the place. Inside, it is absolutely stunning. It has some pieces that any ancient history nerd would recognize immediately, like the only surviving bust of Scipio Africanus and the Alexander mosaic from Pompeii. It also housed my single favorite piece of ancient art: the flora mosaic from Herculeaneum. Seeing that in person was the highlight of that entire Italy trip for me.
Thanks for sharing this. If/when I get to Italy I will have to check it out. Sounds amazing.
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Old 12-10-2013, 09:40 AM   #24
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Stonehenge rocks!

Stonehenge Sound Study Suggests Iconic Rocks Were Picked For Their Acoustic Properties (VIDEO)

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In July, the researchers gained clearance to conduct tests on the rocks at the Stonehenge site itself. They found the stones produced "distinctive if muted sounds, suggesting that they would have probably been full 'ringers' if they had the resonant space around them," Devereux and his collaborator wrote in an article describing the study.

Markings found on the Stonehenge rocks suggest that ancient people struck them -- but it's unclear whether the people were trying to make pretty sounds or simply breaking off bits of the rocks to keep as souvenirs, the researchers said.

"The stones may have been thought to have magical, qualities, mana, because of their exceptional sonic nature," Devereux told HuffPost Science, adding that even if the stones did not produce their own "rock music," they may have been revered for their sound qualities.
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Old 01-07-2014, 09:02 AM   #25
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I've really enjoyed reading this thread.

I've always been in interested in Native American history. The area where we live was once the home of a large tribe of Cherokee Indians. We have found over a dozen arrowheads in our fields we plant. Our sons found several pieces of pottery while digging in one of the creeks.

I'm also interested in Biblical archaeology.
I visit this site every now and then.
Top 20 Biblical Archaeology Events and Discoveries of 2012 – Biblical Archaeology Society
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Old 01-07-2014, 10:30 AM   #26
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The area where we live was once the home of a large tribe of Cherokee Indians. We have found over a dozen arrowheads in our fields we plant. Our sons found several pieces of pottery while digging in one of the creeks.
That's very cool. The Cherokees have a pretty amazing history.

Just curious - what do you do with the artifacts you uncover? I've seen some well-built arrowhead displays.
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Old 01-07-2014, 05:39 PM   #27
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That's very cool. The Cherokees have a pretty amazing history.

Just curious - what do you do with the artifacts you uncover? I've seen some well-built arrowhead displays.

Yes, they were an amazing people. There was a large tribe that lived about
two miles north of where we lived. A few people who have seen the pottery we found said were probably from a hunting camp that was once by the creek. They would have these small sheltered camps to store supplies and rest while on extended hunting trips.

There is a highway that runs through four counties now that was built on an old Cherokee trail called the Warrior's Path. It was also used by other tribes in the surrounding area.

The a large area east of us across a river was only used as a neutral hunting reserve
for the Cherokees and a few other tribes south and east of them.

We keep in a cabinet in our dining room. And yeah, I have a few friends
who display the ones they've found in displays.

There's a guy that lives a few miles from me that has a large collection of
artifacts. I visited him a few years ago. He also builds bows, arrows, arrowheads, spears, knives, and makes them using only the same type tools of that the Cherokees used. He does not used modern machines or cutting tools.

He was a very interesting guy to meet. He actually made all the knives and weapons you see in close-ups in the 1992 film The Last of the Mohicans.
The movie was filmed not far from where we live. Daniel Day Lewis, one of the actors, lived in the forest on his own for about a month before they started production to get into his part.
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Old 01-07-2014, 11:19 PM   #28
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The commoners of the ancient city of Pompeii may have eaten a varied diet, with the wealthier even dining on giraffe, new research suggests.

Remains of food scraps found in the drains of Pompeii, Italy, a Roman city wiped out by a volcano, revealed that the middle- and lower-class residents dined on cheap but healthy foods, while slightly wealthier citizens dined on delicacies.

The new findings belie the common belief that the Roman elite dined on exotic delicacies while poor Romans starved on birdseed.

"The traditional vision of some mass of hapless lemmings — scrounging for whatever they can pinch from the side of a street, or huddled around a bowl of gruel — needs to be replaced by a higher fare and standard of living, at least for the urbanites in Pompeii," study co-author Steven Ellis, a classics professor at the University of Cincinnati, said in a statement.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...ru%2Bslider%2B

I heard Henry VIII ate peacock and swans regularly. I should confirm that, but it's nice to know people today know some animals just shouldn't be eaten. It's just...you know...
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Old 03-30-2014, 06:01 PM   #29
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Skeletons reveal secrets of Black Death that plagued Europe 600 years ago – and its unfortunate victims | National Post
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Old 05-13-2014, 10:18 AM   #30
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Exclusive: Found after 500 years, the wreck of Christopher Columbus’s flagship the Santa Maria - Archaeology - Science - The Independent
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Old 05-20-2014, 03:38 PM   #31
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Oh shit! That's sooooo awwweeesssommmeee
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Old 05-22-2014, 09:28 PM   #32
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Ah... archeology
and sometime history buff...

I love sitting nearby the Temple of Dendur in The Met

http://www.ancient-egypt.co.uk/metro...n_ny%20770.htm

didn't scroll all the way down...they might not have photographed the fact that there's a Pool in front and partly up the sides of the raised area. there's papyrus plants in it. In front of the pool lining up with the temple are 2 statues. It sits in a Big room pretty much by itself with a slanted wall almost totally filled with a window on the north side.. Wonderful! ~Just there a few weeks back.
-------------------------------------

My mom enjoyed learning about cultures from all over the world....as well The Naitive Amercans right here.
We lived (back then) not too far from what was then The Museum of American Indians. So i got to see models of (yes) tepees, but also the cliff dwellings of the Anazasni (Adobe type homes under big cliff faces/ in natural caves), the wooden Long Houses of the Iraquoi nation, and the houses of the North-West peoples.

Because we lived nearish to Inwood Park (lines part of the northwest of Manhattan) you could go and see that/still see the biggest natural forest left in Manhattan) much of it goes up into the hill(s) there.
Plenty of arrowheads and (other stuff) dug up from there.

So I have a difference sense of Manahttan Island than many people do. Also lived near were you could go and see The Palisades of NJ (a geological wonder) and the Hudson River heading north and south. (Glorious)
OK that's more geology than archeology ... But people who know nothing about Fort Tryon Park (right below Inwood), or Inwood are quite suprised to see such a green forested place in Manhattan!

And there a plaque (in Inwood park) where the Lenape Indians "sold" Mahattan to Peter Minuet. OK there's some more History for ya!
--------------------------------------

Pearl, I know we (when I was in late grade school- earlier than you) learned about the Aztecs, Mayans and Incas. If we learned about the Native Amercans of the USA back then idk....especially since I'd already picked up alot of the info from the museum I mentioned, plus Museum Natural History.
--------------------------------------

I had the incredible privillage of (with a friend who drove) visiting the Three Mesas of The Hopi Nation back in 79.
Both my parents loved the often stark beauty of shapes and colors of the canyons, mesas, buttes and smaller formations of the Arizona & New Meixco high desert.
As an artist from a young age the photos I saw deeply appealed to my color and sculptural senses!

So there we were up on the mesas where you could look south west and see the Mountains north of Flagstaff, Arz at least 50, maybe more like 70 miles away. Traditional Hopi houses are made of rocks and slabbed rocks instead of adobe /brick in teh other Pueblo peoples in new Mexico.. Quite wonderful to look it.

Old Oriabi is one of two or three of the oldest continuously lived in villages in the USA part of NA.
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Old 01-09-2015, 02:33 PM   #33
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World War I in Photos: Introduction - The Atlantic

This is an amazing photo series with hundreds of (many never-before-seen) images of World War I. Really cool if you're interested in the time period, or European/military history in general.

The Atlantic also did a series on World War II later in the year, I will post the link I have at home once I get there.
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