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Dreadsox 12-06-2006 09:02 PM

Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
The average American father spends:


7 minutes of quality time a day with his children.



The average American mother spends:

11 minutes of quality time with her children, daily.







Thoughts? These stats come from a workshop I attended today. Does this bother you?

Dreadsox 12-06-2006 09:03 PM

Boys brains are not developmentally suited for today's elementary school.


Thoughts?

Dreadsox 12-06-2006 09:05 PM

If you are not holding your baby and talking to it for large amounts of time as an infant........

You are not helping its brain boot up, leading to a lack of emotional empathy down the road.

Ormus 12-06-2006 09:06 PM

Re: Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Dreadsox
Does this bother you?
It adds credence to the phrase, "Focus on your own damn family."

JCOSTER 12-06-2006 09:19 PM

I don't know what other people do but my husband and myself spend alot of time with our 2 boys. Thats why we look like this :crazy: and sometimes like :drunk:

I do however agree with the elementary school comment.

BVS 12-06-2006 09:23 PM

Re: Re: Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Ormus


It adds credence to the phrase, "Focus on your own damn family."

:yes:

redhotswami 12-06-2006 09:28 PM

Re: Re: Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Ormus


It adds credence to the phrase, "Focus on your own damn family."

I saw that bumper sticker and almost drooled myself into a car crash. How do I get one, do you know??

BostonAnne 12-06-2006 09:59 PM

Re: Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Dreadsox
The average American father spends:

7 minutes of quality time a day with his children.

The average American mother spends:

11 minutes of quality time with her children, daily.


Thoughts? These stats come from a workshop I attended today. Does this bother you?

Yes, very much. I believe this too. Work, pick up from daycare, cook dinner, clean up, make sure homework is done, bedtime...

Squeeze in laundry, food shopping, cleaning, etc.

Quote:

Originally posted by Dreadsox

Boys brains are not developmentally suited for today's elementary school.

Maybe that's why they crave the electronic games so much - it is more suited? Or does it corrupt their brains?

I have been troubled at the amount of kids that just can't get in the routine of doing homework. I kind of thought it was a discipline issue (I have a real hard time getting my kids to do homework, so I have been feeling that I have been doing something wrong) but now I'm starting to feel that it's just that there is too much and there are a lot of kids (seems like mostly boys, but girls too) that just can't seem to get into the schedule.

BostonAnne 12-06-2006 10:02 PM

Re: Re: Re: Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by redhotswami


I saw that bumper sticker and almost drooled myself into a car crash. How do I get one, do you know??


Is it one of these?
http://www.bumperart.com/ProductDeta...roductID=12260 http://www.cafepress.com/buy/focus%2...t_/pg_/c_/fpt_

anitram 12-06-2006 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Dreadsox
Boys brains are not developmentally suited for today's elementary school.

What is different about today's boys as opposed to the boys of 15 years ago or 30 years ago?

What is different about today's elementary schools as opposed to those 15 or 30 years ago?

coemgen 12-07-2006 12:12 AM

I believe it. It's very sad. We're way too busy as a society, and disconnected by the digital age, I believe. Too many parents just pop in DVDs for their children all day. Too many people spend time on the Internet (and children). Heck, I do. I try to do it mostly at work and when everyone in the house is sleeping though. I too often have to fight my information junkie side and remember my family's more important.

We could all stand to spend more time with our children, spouses, parents and friends. We're built for these connections.

coemgen 12-07-2006 12:17 AM

I actually just read this on my friend's myspace about five minutes ago. Weird. Maybe this is one of the important messages of our times?



The Mayonnaise Jar and 2 Cups of Coffee

When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a
day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the 2 cups of coffee.

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of
him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a very large and empty
mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the
students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar.
He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the
golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They
agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of
course, the sand filled up everything else. He asked once more if the jar
was full. The students responded with an unanimous "yes."

The professor then produced two cups of coffee from under the table and
poured the entire contents into the jar effectively filling the empty space
between the sand. The students laughed.

"Now," said the professor as the laughter subsided, "I want you to recognize
that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important
things---God, your family, your children, your health, your friends and your
favorite passions---and if everything else was lost and only they remained,
your life would still be full.

The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house and
your car.

The sand is everything else---the small stuff. "If you put the sand into the
jar first," he continued, "there is no room for the pebbles or the golf
balls. The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the
small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to
you.

"Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with
your children. Spend time with your parents. Visit with grandparents. Take
time to get medical checkups. Take your spouse out to dinner. Play another
18. There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal. Take
care of the golf balls first---the things that really matter. Set your
priorities. The rest is just sand."


One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the coffee
represented. The professor smiled. "I'm glad you asked.

It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there's
always room for a couple of cups of coffee with a friend."


I'm going to get off of the Internet now and go cuddle with my wife. :heart:

fah 12-07-2006 01:55 AM

Re: Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Dreadsox
The average American father spends:


7 minutes of quality time a day with his children.



The average American mother spends:

11 minutes of quality time with her children, daily.




Thoughts? These stats come from a workshop I attended today. Does this bother you?

How do 'they' define quality time?

redhotswami 12-07-2006 04:48 AM

Re: Re: Re: Re: Boys, Dads, and Parenting other such things...
 
Actually it was black and white. But it doesn't matter. I can still get one of these. THANK YOU! :bow:

Greenlight 12-07-2006 05:06 AM

I'm rather sceptical about such surveys. To my mind, quality time means any time spent interacting positively with your child and covers a whole host of things such as chatting in the car, helping out with schoolwork, snuggling up together watching TV etc. Obviously it's difficult in this day and age with many parents both working full time to spend as much time as you'd like with your kids and of course it's even harder for separated families. It is an easy option to let kids spend too long on the playstation or whatever but I think it's a fallacy to think we spend less quality time with them than say a generation ago. Kids spend much more time at home these days, whereas in the past they often had much more freedom, spending hours playing out with their mates, only coming back for meals- dads were still out at work all day and mums were occupied for long hours doing all the household chores. If you go back even further, pre WW1, children were expected "to be seen and not heard" ,rich kids were relegated to the nursery with a nanny, hardly seeing their parents, whilst in poorer families, parents were again busy working long hours and kids, if they weren't having to work themselves, often had to look after themselves to a large degree.


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