Top 10 of the Decade: The 1960's - Page 3 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Lemonade Stand > Zoo Station
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-19-2010, 12:18 AM   #31
Blue Crack Addict
 
Lancemc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ba Sing Se
Posts: 17,664
Local Time: 08:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by bono_212 View Post
Of all the "great directors", I think Antonioni might be the only one I haven't seen a single film of.
Not to be condescending at all, but I'm sure he's not the only one. Of course it also matters who the "great directors" are.
__________________

__________________
Lancemc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 12:26 AM   #32
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
gump's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 7,925
Local Time: 07:47 PM
I agree that Antonioni is more visually interesting than perhaps anything Truffaut ever put on film. At the same time, I think that the vast majority of Truffaut's films are much more emotionally gripping (especially compared to Antonioni's more detached style) and therefore they resonate much more. This is basically the same issue I have with the Truffaut vs Godard comparison.
__________________

__________________
gump is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 12:32 AM   #33
Blue Crack Addict
 
Lancemc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ba Sing Se
Posts: 17,664
Local Time: 08:47 PM
I find Antonioni's films to be remarkably emotional, more in a pure cinema context perhaps, less reliant on narrative means. A simple (but far from simplistic) compositional choice or cut in an Antonioni film carries more emotional resonance to me than an entire film by one of any lesser directors.
__________________
Lancemc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 01:07 AM   #34
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 37,996
Local Time: 04:47 PM
I'm not sure if it's fair to put Antonioni in the same category as Godard. A lot of what the latter did was simply trying to get a reaction or to be cool, and I get the feeling that Antonioni was following a purer muse.

Truffaut was certainly the greatest humanist of his contemporaries, but that doesn't automatically make him the best. He was a better screenwriter than a director, and I consider myself a fan.
__________________
lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 01:14 AM   #35
Blue Crack Addict
 
Lancemc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ba Sing Se
Posts: 17,664
Local Time: 08:47 PM
I wouldn't compare the two for a second either. Antonioni was always striving for something elevated with his work, and created new cinematic forms to attain it. Something intellectual, but also quite human and personal in his own unique way. I hesitate to dismiss Godard purely as a provocateur, however. He really explored cinema as a formal design medium, and did plenty of interesting things with genre. To what end is debatable, and he frequently fails to engage me on any higher level as well. But sometimes his art works for me in all the right ways, namely with my listed Alphaville. Also with Masculin-Feminin, Band of Outsiders and probably A Woman is a Woman.
__________________
Lancemc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 01:18 AM   #36
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 37,996
Local Time: 04:47 PM
Well I tried not to make an absolute statement, which is why I said "a lot of what (he) did" as opposed to most, or everything. There is no denying that he had the best eye of anyone on either bank of the New Wave river. I just think that it was often to not very interesting ends.

Masculin-Feminine and Week-End are my big blind spots. Unfortunately not in the (very cheap) Region 2 boxed set that I bought. 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her is also supposed to be a standout.

Band of Outsiders would have been on a longer list for the 60's, FWIW.
__________________
lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 01:20 AM   #37
Blue Crack Addict
 
Lancemc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ba Sing Se
Posts: 17,664
Local Time: 08:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazarus View Post
2 or 3 Things I Know About Her is also supposed to be a standout.
That seems to be a favorite of a lot of the connoisseurs. I haven't seen it either, but it's next on my Godard list.
__________________
Lancemc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 01:23 AM   #38
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
gump's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 7,925
Local Time: 07:47 PM
The Godard analogy was misplaced - didn't mean to compare him to Antonioni (and I admire the latter much more), just that sometimes I have a similar reaction to some of their work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lazarus View Post
Truffaut was certainly the greatest humanist of his contemporaries, but that doesn't automatically make him the best. He was a better screenwriter than a director, and I consider myself a fan.
I can get behind this.


On the Godard discussion, apart from Breathless, I also like Vivre Sa Vie a great deal. The rest is a bit hit and miss for me, mostly miss. I don't care much for Pierrot Le Fou or Contempt, for instance.
__________________
gump is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 01:26 AM   #39
Blue Crack Addict
 
Lancemc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ba Sing Se
Posts: 17,664
Local Time: 08:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gump View Post
I don't care much for Pierrot Le Fou or Contempt, for instance.
Two of his most visually inventive... and also empty. I really haven't seen much of anything of his from the 70s onward. I hear there are a few gems though. I'm particularly interested in his recent digital work, even though I hear most of it isn't very good.
__________________
Lancemc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 02:07 AM   #40
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 37,996
Local Time: 04:47 PM
I thought Passion, from the early 80's, was very good.
__________________
lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 02:24 AM   #41
Blue Crack Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 26,955
Local Time: 04:47 PM
Without really thinking about it:

1. Rosemary's Baby (Polanski, 1968)
2. Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960)
3. The Great Escape (Sturges, 1963)
4. The Sound Of Music (Wise, 1965)
5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
6. The Graduate (Nichols, 1967)
7. The Time Machine (Pal, 1960)
8. Support Your Local Sheriff (Kennedy, 1969)
9. Planet Of The Apes (Schaffner, 1968)
10. Yours Mine And Ours (Shavelson, 1968)

I have not seen many of the titles on the lists, though (including any of the Leone's). Also, I couldn't pick a singular Bond flick that I've seen that stood out above the rest.
__________________
the tourist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 02:24 AM   #42
Blue Crack Distributor
 
bono_212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 81,104
Local Time: 04:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancemc View Post
Not to be condescending at all, but I'm sure he's not the only one. Of course it also matters who the "great directors" are.
Thus the quotation marks. The names you always see on the list of the greatest directors, etc.

Though, already I see I'm wrong, as I'd forgotten about Godard.
__________________
bono_212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 02:38 AM   #43
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 37,996
Local Time: 04:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by bono_212 View Post
Thus the quotation marks.

Damn, someone just got 212'ed.
__________________
lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 02:39 AM   #44
Blue Crack Distributor
 
bono_212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 81,104
Local Time: 04:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazarus View Post
Damn, someone just got 212'ed.
Not my intention
__________________
bono_212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2010, 02:48 AM   #45
The Male
 
LemonMelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hollywoo
Posts: 65,790
Local Time: 04:47 PM
Well, I watched a few movies tonight to help solidify my list. I still feel it's awful and front-loaded, and because of my distinct lack of interest in the genre up until recently, there are no Westerns to be seen here. The one thing I like about this list is the amount of variety present, but that's about it. I'm going to look back on this list and laugh, a la Peef in the top 50 albums thread:

1. The Graduate (dir. Mike Nichols, 1967)
2. Psycho (dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
3. The Great Escape (dir. John Sturges, 1963)
4. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Atomic Bomb (dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1964)
5. A Charlie Brown Christmas (dir. Bill Melendez, 1965)
6. What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? (dir. Robert Aldrich, 1962)
7. Midnight Cowboy (dir. John Schlesinger, 1969)*
8. The Apartment (dir. Billy Wilder, 1960)
9. 8 1/2 (dir. Frederico Fellini, 1963)
10. Easy Rider (dir. Dennis Hopper, 1969)

*Enjoy, deep.
__________________

__________________


Now.
LemonMelon is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com