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Old 03-15-2010, 06:10 AM   #46
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Review of “The Imperfections of Memory” (airdate March 12, 2010)

This is the most unforgivable episode yet. The arcs of the usually enjoyable Daniel Graystone and Joseph Adama falter, making the cliché roles provided for the female characters even more agonizing to watch. Special effects can’t compensate for bad storytelling.

The budding relationship between Sister Clarice and Amanda remains boring. Although the plot element introduced in this episode of Amanda’s delusions is potentially interesting, it’s dramatized in so unfulfilling a manner that it ultimately feels more like a potential time-filler. I found Clarice’s interpretation of Amanda’s hallucinations as divine a bit too odd to accept; her beliefs have moved beyond slightly fascinating (with her references to avatars as a means of life after death) to thoroughly implausible; I understand that the writers are acknowledging the strangeness of her opinions by having her black husband express the same skepticism, but such ideas just make her character seem silly. According to Clarice, Zoe was a prophet, basically? Did Sister Clarice have any reason to believe this when she was alive and did she treat Zoe as such? It’s all very hokey and without being dramatically realistic or remarkable.

To her credit, Paula Malcolmson acts very well, but it’s painful to watch her character’s unchanging and unappealing arc over so many episodes. Her disclosure to Clarice that she had a mental breakdown years after her brother’s death from a car crash wasn’t all that interesting or perhaps it just wasn’t presented well. It felt extreme and a bit surprising, to be sure, but this was ruined by a hunch that it was also contrived for melodramatic effect. Time will tell whether this back story will be given due attention and will show respect for the details of such a psychological condition; I really hope Amanda’s past and present mental state will be carefully explored to ground things realistically. There’s a danger of this development coming off as a convenient means of having her relapse now due to Zoe’s death without explaining exactly why – beyond the fact that Daniel isn’t around as much as he should be to comfort her. It would show contempt for the viewers to do so.

From the pilot this far into the series, Amanda’s mourning could have been as deep and innovative a meditation on death and loss as the first couple of seasons of “Six Feet Under.” Yet the show hasn’t really dealt with the loss of a loved one very well, either. While there are occasionally remarkable moments that make her pain relatable, most of the grieving feels like the formula I’ve seen before on other TV shows and movies.

I particularly hated the scenes of Clarice and Amanda partaking in drugs. Maybe that makes me seem conservative, but I find this plot device both cliché and a cheap and false way to make Amanda seem cool, as she recalls having done this before. It’s disgusting. There’s nothing down to earth about taking drugs, and it often impedes – rather than helps – emotional growth from tragedy. I would be more sympathetic for Amanda’s weakness here, if it weren’t framed by the writers as no big deal – as though she were simply relaxing and that this were an acceptable coping mechanism. It’s sad that, for all this program’s failure to comment on controversial political issues with real moral ambiguity, it has had no trouble taking a one-sided approach on drug usage.

It was nice to see Clarice and Zoe both express ruthlessness about using Amanda and Philomon, respectively – that they were leading on their targets without regard to the consequences to them. Still, it’s obvious that they’ll come to care about them and develop emotional attachments. It’s all happening within the scope of a very predictable dialectic. Indeed, since the pilot, this is a drama that, unlike Battlestar Galactica, doesn’t really take chances to break new ground in storytelling.

Some critics have said that the show’s problem is one of slow pacing; executive producer David Eick and some of the actors have implied as much by hinting that the second half of the season picks up the pace and is when the program finds itself. Yet the problem is more complex than that. There were many instances, during Battlestar Galactica’s third and especially fourth seasons, when I wished that the pace of events were slowed down to allow for more texture and exploration of a given character’s emotional place. In Caprica’s case, it’s the reverse. There is a lot of texture, but it feels empty because it’s mostly focused on food and characters’ movements and gestures (despite the fact that watching Daniel Graystone dice fruits is a pleasure). None of this slowed pace results in improving the dialogue, which often doesn’t feel realistic or engaging enough. The slower pace hasn’t allowed for the insertion of more dramatic diversity or for elaboration on interesting ideas. Instead, it has led to the same types of dramatic points being made over and over about our characters. Again and again we see Joseph seeking Tamara, wanting to believe she’s alive; we hear Amanda repeatedly mourn over Zoe’s loss and the insensitivity of the GDD; we observe Daniel, Xander, and Philomon continually ponder why the seeming functionality of the processor isn’t transferable to other cylon bodies; we see Lacey beg to move a package to Gemenon in far too many scenes; we glimpse Sister Clarice struggle with the other STO members to trust in her mission and, even though it’s only been 2 episodes now, attempt to bond with Amanda over Zoe’s death in ways that never feel fresh; and we witness Zoe engage far too often in silly or flirtatious moments meant to bring the viewer levity. The show’s mistaken approach has been to constantly drive home to viewers the same dramatic points far too frequently, and it has been tedious specifically because these points weren’t very original or interesting in the first place.

I’m saddened that much of the season’s budget was wasted on special effects to give life to shockingly perfunctory V-World scenes. These included the flight simulator Zoe and Philomon played as well as the game “New Cap City,” into which Joseph Adama and the teenager sent by Tamara ventured. They were the most boring of all the episode’s scenes because the story’s emphasis was on superficial effects that barely drove home any of the drama or were simply used to heighten already very weak story elements. Watching Zoe and Philomon engage in romantic foreplay was as dull as can be expected; I was rarely a fan of action sequences on Battlestar Galactica unless they involved a major battle. Needless to say, there was no risk to Zoe when her plane was crashing, so why should anyone care? When I saw the two on a deserted island together, I knew they’d kiss. Somewhere in head writer Jane Espenson’s office is a box containing formulaic plot devices scribbled on jumbled pieces of paper. Since these two’s relationship was predictably heading in this direction for several episodes, I knew it was only a matter of time before this well-worn chestnut made its appearance.

There was at least some decent dialogue on the island. Writer Mathew Roberts, perhaps with Jane Espenson’s help, did a great job of making the two’s technological discussions comprehensible to the audience while sounding plausible. I enjoyed Zoe demonstrating her intelligence by suggesting ways to improve the flight simulator’s background design by mathematically programming it to generate infinite variations of trees to appear more real. I also appreciated how her advice on improving the cylon’s development gave Philomon a eureka moment. He, in turn, figured out that maybe the trouble Graystone Industries had encountered in replicating the microprocessor chip for other cylon bodies might have to do with the chip’s physical structure, and not its digital content. However, the goofy tone in which she eagerly insisted that the solution was to let the cylon out in public (which would allow her to escape to Gemenon) felt like something out of Buffy and such influences are unwelcome.

In New Cap City, I suppose it was a bit thrilling seeing Joseph and the teen dodge being shot – which is to say, infinitely preferable to the blandness of Zoe and Philomon’s date – but that was pretty much all that intrigued me, and just barely. The tension in Joseph’s plot was constantly about not dying in the game. This is a misuse of such a fine actor. I didn’t appreciate the Buffy-like attempt at humor when Joseph’s request about whether they could fly in the game was met with the teen’s false instructions; it was obvious that he was mocking Joseph 10 seconds before the joke was over. I was somewhat fond of how the teen sold Joseph on New Cap City’s perks by telling him that one didn’t need Viagra to have lots of sex there. Yet, similarly, it seemed out of context for a father to be amused while desperately searching for his lost daughter. The last minutes of this subplot presented themselves in a way that hinted at some surprise in store, but it was just some young woman stalking Joseph and offering to aid in his search for Tamara in exchange for money. Big deal. Moreover, having the teen killed in the game and unable to help Joseph any longer – and probably having him exit the show – was a waste of the actor who played him since he was far more talented than the guy who acts as Keon.

Speaking of our least interesting subplot, watching Keon and Lacey chilling out on some swings was another cliché. I would be far more stressed out than either character let on. This was another holdover from Joss Whedon’s creative approach to Buffy, in which Espenson participated. He attempted to draw parallels between the concerns of regular, stereotypical teens and those of fantastical fictional characters facing life or death situations. The trouble was that this metaphorical storytelling always felt contrived on Buffy – like Joss and company were trying just a little too hard to make fantasy elements relatable to viewers by forcing them to fit the tone of high school melodrama. This overly metaphorical conception of how to construct a drama so that the audience can relate to it in the broadest sense is hurting Caprica just as much. The world that Ronald D. Moore set up in his pilot was exciting and realistically relatable because its characters could serve as means to seriously and innovatively examine the very real trends of terrorism and other pressing issues that face us. The natural path for the show – from which Espenson deviated – was to illustrate, among other themes, what could drive lost youth toward various political (perhaps even fundamentalist) beliefs and even toward violence to achieve those ends. Even the phenomenon of “going Columbine,” which I think is very much emotionally connected to terrorism in terms of its subjects reacting to feeling betrayed by the world, could be probed in this way. Yet, do either of these characters – young and in love in the schoolyard – feel like portrayals of members of a religious cult? Do they even feel consistent emotionally with the characters established in the pilot? Do they bring viewers one step closer to understanding the minds of such people or even the real issues confronting our world, which the mainstream media constantly frames in the most destructively simplistic and nationalistic terms? No. That’s not simply a creative failure on Jane Espenson’s part, but a moral one, too, given that this show naturally lent itself to something more than formulaic teen drama in a science fiction setting.

The only moderately engaging scenes in the episode involved watching the great performances of John Piper-Ferguson as Tomas Virgis, Eric Stoltz as Daniel Graystone, and Hiro Kanagawa as Cyrus Xander. Kudos to Stoltz for insisting that Kanagawa be given prominence, according to the pilot DVD audio commentary. It was slightly exciting to hear Virgis explain that the stolen chip never worked, which led Daniel and Cyrus to puzzle over how they seemed to have enabled the cylon to work. This makes me wonder whether this chip was ever necessary to input Avatar Zoe into the cylon. Was the entire theft and the ensuing collateral damage all for nothing? Virgis’ revelation led to a few scenes in which Daniel tried to make sense out of why the cylon was working. I enjoyed the way he woke Philomon from the V-World by playing the piano in his lab. In a later scene, I even liked the way cylon Zoe sought to distract the dog, which sensed something odd about her and started barking, from attracting Daniel’s attention to her by kicking its ball away. However, I don’t buy that the dog could detect anything unusual about the cylon, including that Zoe was inside it; there was no emanating odor or any other signs, and the dog had no reason to expect that it was anything other than a robot. Indeed, the dog’s sixth sense detecting Zoe felt preposterous – like it was thrown in as another cliché, based on numerous other fictional works, in which the dog intuits something that he then tries to tell his human master.

The episode ended with Daniel realizing that Zoe may indeed be in the robot. The fact that it took this long for such a minor revelation is upsetting because these actors deserve far superior material with which to work. Similarly, Daniel angrily yelling at Cyrus that he would not sell his professional sports league to Virgis to fund the manufacture of the cylons seemed like it was meant to be more climactic than it actually was. Depressingly, that’s how much of the drama has played out in the post-pilot series, with the exception of the episode “There Is Another Sky.” Hopefully, Michael Taylor’s next two episodes can rescue this show from the disastrous depths to which it has sunk.

6.7 out of 10
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:24 AM   #47
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James Marsters recently responded to this question with the kind of political guts I love to see; what a brilliant guy!:
"How do you see Barnabas? Is he a terrorist or a criminal? What is he?

Marsters: No man, he's a revolutionary. I mean, how I see him is how he seems himself. It's a complex question. I'll answer as an actor who's making the guy. You know, you could say that George Washington was a terrorist. He was using different battle techniques. I mean, if you compare the English who were just coming at them in formation, standing people up in open fields and just marching forward, and he was just hiding in the bushes and shooting... I mean, that's a little bit like, you know, the new tactics that we're facing in Afghanistan and Iraq. There is a difference, the terrorist is trying to instill terror in a civilian population, and they're definitely expanding the battlefield to civilian populations and that is also something scary. But in my mind, in Barnabas's mind he is trying to save the world. He's trying to give the world a new religion that will give guidance to people. He recognizes that some people -- not all, but some people really do need a superman to tell them, "You will not pee in the pool and if you do I will kick you out." They need a god and they need the 10 Commandments. They need "Thou shall do this" and "Don't do that" and "You'll burn if you don't" and "You'll go to heaven if you do" and they need a daddy figure. And without that, you really face what Rome faced, which is people giving into sensual desire to the point that the whole society wrecks. That one's true. You know, the Roman society -- it's the same religion that they have on Caprica, which is, you know, a multi-deity mythology. And in Rome, all the Roman mythology had nothing to do with what you should do or what you should try to become -- it was just trying to explain human psychology. The gods behaved in very human ways, and it was really just exploring why we are the way we are but that doesn't give guidance. And you can argue that that's exactly what you should do, but Barnabas sees it differently, because he's going into these V-Clubs and he's seeing best friends shoot each other down for fun."

The whole interview is here:
Caprica: James Marsters Sinks His Teeth into Another Sci-Fi Series - The Telefile Blog - TV Shows & TV News - TV Reviews | TWoP
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Old 03-19-2010, 01:57 PM   #48
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I think this actor gives Christianity to much credit.

I don't think it saved Rome or its Empire at all.

As for this series I am liking most of it.

What is with the teacher hanging out smoking lounges getting high, a little reminiscent of the 60s hippy era?


I did find a video cast with voice overs with the writers giving their thoughts.
It was the same format as the old podcasts they did for BSG, but with the video, the one I watched gave me more of an appreciation for the actor and character - Tomas Vergis.
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Old 03-22-2010, 09:29 PM   #49
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Review of “Ghosts in the Machine” (airdate March 19, 2010)

As expected, writer Michael Taylor rescued the series from its lows last week with more unpredictable story telling and improved dialogue. Yet he, unexpectedly, failed to soar to the heights I’d come to expect from his past work, especially on “Battlestar Galactica.”

Firstly, the story line revolving around Daniel (Eric Stoltz) and Zoe Graystone (Alessandra Toressani) (well, her avatar, actually, but, for all intents and purposes, it’s Zoe) was quite well written and beautifully acted. Thankfully, the pitfalls of cheesy teen romance were avoided by leaving Philomon and Keon aside this week. This meant that Lacy Rand’s (Magda Apanowicz) scenes, though few – as they have been the last several episodes – were enjoyable, as she interacted only with Zoe. The two friends discussed the latter’s dilemma about trying to convince Daniel she wasn’t inside the cylon, so he’d pay less attention to it, and she could flee to Gemenon, as planned.

Finally, viewers were given a strong and believable justification as to why Zoe was hiding from him. Based upon his misleading her when he transferred her from the virtual world into a cylon body, she concluded that, while he might feel some connection to her as a representation of his daughter, this wasn’t enough to fully humanize her in his eyes. Given what she saw as his business priorities, if he were sure that she was inside the robot soldier, which he had already been developing for a military contract, he might exploit her.

Father and sort-of-daughter’s doubly complicated relationship was illustrated in their interaction, which offered up this episode’s best moments. Stoltz displayed both the emotional neediness of a father seeking his daughter as well as the cold disregard he’d show a stranger in pursuit of that goal. The scenes in which Daniel tried to connect with Zoe’s avatar as though she were his daughter were incredibly effective. I particularly loved how he lectured her angrily about her supposedly committing the terrorist act that killed many on the train, rather than directing her displaced feelings toward their source: her parents. The way he explained how wrong she was to be so hard on her parents for the mistakes they had made in raising her – that life itself was full of difficulties forcing snap and potentially regrettable decisions – felt like an insight from which I could learn. This is when Battlestar worked best, when it made me look at the world in a different way by pondering some truth I hadn’t considered. I’m happy to see Taylor ensure Caprica finally lives up to its predecessor in continuing to do that at which most of the post-pilot episodes had failed. Furthermore, seeing Daniel express his love for his child in showing understanding for her own seeming mistakes was moving. It all made what came next that much more disturbing.

Just as Daniel had a twin relationship with Zoe’s avatar, it seemed that the latter’s attitude toward him was dictated by factors beyond simply his daughter’s feelings. Her experience as an artificial intelligence observing from afar also provided her with the skeptical perspective of him as a scientist and industrialist who might threaten her survival. Presumably hoping that Daniel would give up on his hunch that his daughter was effectively still alive inside the cylon and to avoid confirming this belief, Zoe’s approach was to only follow orders given the robot; in front of her father, she could not afford to act outside of officially programmed parameters. So, even though Zoe was touched by Daniel’s pleas, her refusal to show herself prompted him to react viciously by using his daughter’s emotions to trick her into doing so.

Although Daniel’s behavior was shockingly manipulative, the fact that it was rooted in his understandable desperation to know for certain whether she was there made it psychologically genuine. His psychological tests played out wonderfully – with each uttered phrase sneakily unveiling the level of cruelty to which he was prepared to resort with disturbing effect. He first reminded her of Zoe’s deep-seated fear of fire, based on the trauma of her witnessing the family home burn down when she was five, while the cylon was instructed to repeatedly assemble and disassemble a gun. He later told the cylon to stand still in the middle of a circle of fire that he hoped would terrify her into stepping out of it.

During each test, Zoe revealed herself in what Daniel called “tells” – slight hesitations and pauses that were uncharacteristic of the robot’s movements – which, in turn, only reinforced his conviction that she was in control. Yet, despite her knowing that she was unconsciously providing these clues, it was realistic that she’d stubbornly stay the course, not knowing what else to do. Yet, the quality of writing maintained such an unpredictably tense atmosphere between the two characters that it was nevertheless a surprise that Zoe didn’t break under duress.

Despite all these breakthroughs in the series, what promised to be a compelling final scene between the two, filled with the moral ambiguity of Battlestar Galactica, felt somewhat unsatisfying. The final test involved Daniel asking the cylon to shoot the dog, which it did with what turned out to be blanks. It was perfectly fine to have Daniel step back from the brink of depravity by not endangering the dog, given the still menacing fact that he forced his daughter to make a hard choice of killing the family dog, rather than expose her free will to not shoot. However, Zoe’s moral complexity was compromised by her disclosure, later on to Lacy, that the cylon had known from the gun’s lightness that it contained blanks. I suppose the audience was still meant to feel dread – and be assured of Zoe’s moral ambiguity – with her telling Lacy that she was tempted to kill her dad and still might if she didn’t escape soon. Yet, it felt like a cop-out to steer clear of Zoe crossing some moral line. Perhaps the writers were correct to keep in check her willingness to sacrifice others to serve her aims. All the same, at this point in the series, she is already the daughter who never committed a terrorist act and, now, she knowingly shot the dog with blanks; in both cases, her father thinks she’s more depraved than she really is, and there’s something unsatisfying about a lead character whose only sins so far are lying to a stranger (Philomon), hiding from her father, and guilt tripping her best friend into helping her run away.

At the episode’s close, it was uncertain what Daniel concluded from the cylon’s actions. Did he think the cylon’s willingness to kill the dog meant Zoe couldn’t be inside it because she wouldn’t do such a thing? Unlikely. More credibly, he was merely disgusted with his daughter’s avatar for taking things this far; he might even have concluded that she is nothing like his daughter and be ready to further dehumanize her. Time will tell.

Less successful, though fairly entertaining, was the plot entailing Joseph Adama’s (Esai Morales) search for his daughter Tamara among the perils of the New Cap City game. He was accompanied by Emmanuelle (Leah Gibson), a mysterious femme fatale who said, in the previous episode, that she had been sent to his aid by Tad, the teen whom Tamara had sent to find him. Emmanuelle was portrayed well and with great subtlety; she was also visually captivating with her unique, though not overtly beautiful or sexual, appearance that gave her toughness a believability. Taylor did a good job of creating obstacles for the characters to surmount, diminishing the predictability that has hurt most of this series’ installments to date. However, it still felt like the virtual world was the least interesting place for the show. I couldn’t really get over the fact that it was a simulation and that, while I couldn’t wait to see father and daughter’s avatar reunited, I didn’t ultimately care for the dangers Joseph had to overcome to find her. Consequently, this story line’s excitement was limited and without sufficient emotional resonance.

It made sense that Joseph hesitated to kill others in the game, despite the stakes of being killed and losing his chance to find Tamara, because everything there feels real and he can’t normally bring himself to violence. His escort, Emmanuelle, upbraided him for jeopardizing both their lives. So, once he got back to the real world, it was an interesting, if somewhat predictable, touch to have him ask his gangster brother Sam (Sasha Roiz) how he kills people so easily. The answer, though intriguing, felt a bit forced in its charming coincidence: imagine that the people you have to kill aren’t real – that it’s all a game. This is, of course, exactly the situation Joseph is facing.

There was a flair I appreciated to the writing of New Cap City this time. It ranged from the superbly acted shifty criminal occupying Joseph’s virtual world apartment to specifically the male transvestite club owner, who conveyed a flamboyant and threatening creepiness. When the transvestite asked Joseph to answer a riddle on penalty of being shot, I worried that, as per TV formula, the gifted hero would come up with the correct answer. I was glad he couldn’t and luckily managed an escape. It was also startling to then have him recognize, as he was leaving, a symbol that Tamara loved to draw on the wall. This, in turn, convinced him to reenter the club and ruthlessly kill (that is, force out of New Cap City permanently) anyone to get near the transvestite to get answers. The transvestite revealed that she had been there, and that, once he tried to have her killed for answering his riddle incorrectly, she acquired mythical status as one who couldn’t die.

I must admit to being confused by the implication of this plot’s ending in this episode. Joseph and Emmanuelle found a wall full of Tamara’s symbols, perhaps implying that she was powerful enough in this game to put her stamp on the territory. Emmanuelle strangely concluded that Tamara was happy in this world and that Joseph should give up on the search. This was an odd assumption. Tamara’s success at dominating the game wouldn’t imply her desire to stay there, surely.

Amanda Graystone’s (Paula Malcolmson) plot had her visiting the site of the car accident that she had witnessed as a passenger and that killed her brother. As in the previous episode, she talked through the bewilderment of having just seen her brother with Sister Clarice (Polly Walker) over the phone. I’m not sure what the dramatic interest is supposed to be; obviously, as Amanda suspected, these are hallucinations that are probably brought on, as Clarice suggested, by the pain over Zoe’s death, which, in turn, remind Amanda of her earlier trauma over her sibling’s passing. The reality is so clear that I’m not even sure what the point is of showing the audience such conversations repeatedly. I was relieved when Clarice’s insistence that she come over was refused. I dislike scenes in which the two of them hang out, although Taylor might have done a better job than previous writer had.

Instead, Amanda was treated to a visit from Tomas Virgis (John Piper-Ferguson). From the moment the robot butler Serge (voiced by Jim Thomson) relayed Virgis’ message that he wished to speak with her, a sense of foreboding loomed over her scenes. He had, after all, threatened to make Daniel suffer, and, imagining his revenge manifesting in an indiscriminate manner upon all those associated with him, the first person I assumed would be hurt was the wife. Yet I was glad to see him do no such harm when she greeted him. He simply told her that Daniel had someone steal his MCP (a kind of microprocessor) and murder two of his friends in the process. This reasonable tack implied Virgis has greater moral ambiguity than the archetypical nemesis. For her part, Amanda responded realistically – expressing loyalty for her husband, who supposedly was not capable of such horrible things, which is what most loved ones of criminals probably tell themselves. Yet the accusations certainly planted doubt in her mind, and her resulting distress took the form of blaming the messenger, as she shooed Virgis away. Nonetheless, this kind of slow-burning, guilt-ridden payback of turning Amanda against Daniel didn’t feel particularly thrilling.

A later scene showed Amanda worrying or grieving. Even if her upset grew out of a new concern (Daniel’s potential criminality) and the scene was only a few seconds long, the mere fact that she was in roughly the same dour mood she had been in every episode so far was exhausting. I already felt like the collective effect of constantly being exposed to scenes in which Amanda mourns made me overreact and recall my very own trauma upon merely detecting the hint of another one unfolding.

Wayne Rose’s directing of this very good episode and last week’s worst one yet indicate how much more important the writing is to the direction. The same could be said for director Michael Nankin helming the very good “There Is Another Sky” and the following, not so good “Know They Enemy.” All this is to say that I’m thankful for Michael Taylor’s presence on Caprica’s staff.

8.4 out of 10
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Old 03-23-2010, 12:11 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deep View Post
I think this actor gives Christianity to much credit.

I don't think it saved Rome or its Empire at all.

As for this series I am liking most of it.

What is with the teacher hanging out smoking lounges getting high, a little reminiscent of the 60s hippy era?


I did find a video cast with voice overs with the writers giving their thoughts.
It was the same format as the old podcasts they did for BSG, but with the video, the one I watched gave me more of an appreciation for the actor and character - Tomas Vergis.
I can understand this interpretation of what Marsters is saying, but I think maybe he's trying to speak from Barnabas' perspective.

I know that Moore once spoke in an audio commentary for, I think, BSG about how he found that monotheism was actually very puritanical in a way that polytheism wasn't and that that was an interesting perspective to take. I got the sense that he wanted "Caprica" to really explore that. I saw the interesting commentary on monotheism as extending to Islam and Judaism as well. Too bad Jane Espenson wasn't at all up to it.

Oh, and I can't STAND Clarice. The pilot was the last time she was even slightly interesting. I blame this fully on Espenson and on Moore and Eick for letting her do this.

Apparently, according to the most recent podcast,
 
Amanda was meant to be seeing her brother because Virgis hired a doppelganger of him to haunt her and drive Daniel's wife crazy; Eick realized that this idea wasn't going to work when he thought things through and realized it would be overly lucky for this doppelganger to appear in front of her at the right times and be able to get away so she couldn't follow. Am I glad Jane Espenson was replaced; she was ruining the fracking show with her retarded ideas! Thankfully, Eick says, they jettisoned the idea in the editing room.
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Old 03-28-2010, 12:17 AM   #51
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Just watched the most recent episode from Friday, which happens to be the last we're going to see the show until September apparently. Exciting stuff! "Caprica" may have had a rather slow start, but it's definitely great now.
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Old 03-29-2010, 08:10 AM   #52
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I'm a few episodes behind right now, and I must say, I hope things pick up soon and the story begins to evolve more. There have been times when it's dragged.

The last episode I saw, the one with Adama's daughter trying to get out of V-world with that kid helping her, was one of the better ones though.
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Old 03-30-2010, 11:33 AM   #53
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No more news eps until Sept? WTF!
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Old 04-16-2010, 05:01 PM   #54
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I thought U2/BSG fans might like this. It was put together by the photographer, who accidentally had his photos leaked before the finale, according to someone on Battlestar Blog Live Journal community. Now, he's released them in this video on youtube; there's also some behind the scenes video in the latter half. Great music taste on that first song!

YouTube - Battlestar Galactica the Final Days Part 2
The guy with the long hair and beard at 2:08 is the great Ronald D. Moore.
The guy with glasses and long hair in a series of pics starting at 2:17 is the great BSG director Michael Rymer. He did the miniseries, "33", the 2-part Season 1 finale "Kobol's Last Gleaming", "Pegasus", "Lay Down Your Burdens" Parts 1 and 2, the 2-part Season 3 finale (Baltar's trial), and many other eps including "Revelations" and the gorgeous finale. He would done a much better job at perfecting the dialogue and overseeing this show, but he wanted out. He would constantly challenge the writers and push to change scenes if he thought they didn't work. He complained to Ron Moore about the script for Baltar's trial which also helped Moore realize in his rewrite to jettison the Sagitaron plot. So sad because he added so much texture and dramatic realism to BSG and could have done the same with Caprica.

Here's an interview with him here; he's very frank:
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Old 04-16-2010, 05:02 PM   #55
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No more news eps until Sept? WTF!
Actually, if you check imdb, it says October. The fact is that even Syfy isn't positive of when it's going to start up. Mark Stern initially said late summer, but then rescinded that date.

However, I felt very let down by the mid-season finale. It had none of the great dialogue and interesting, subtle ideas of the previous episode. I was actually distraught. I've get around to finishing my review, hopefully soon. For anyone who's interested the podcast to this and previous eps are up; Michael Taylor participates in the last one with David Eick and Magda Apanowicz; will they ever give her stuff matching her talents, as they did in the pilot?:
http://www.syfy.com/caprica/podcasts.php
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Old 09-30-2010, 11:56 AM   #56
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It's back early, my babies!

Tuesday, October 5, 2010 at 10 pm Eastern time on both Syfy in the US and Space in Canada!

The network was supposed to reach a renewal decision in August, but isn't sure, so it decided to extend the actors' contracts until November and is giving this show a month or so to perform a little better in the ratings before they reach their decision then. It's in our hands whether the show survives to a 2nd season or not. Forget Jane Espenson's bungling, uninsightful, weak drama! It's a new day that hopefully will follow the path laid out in the pilot by Ron Moore!

We have to help by watching it live . DVRing, which only helps a little if watched within a week, and illegal downloading won't help.

Buying the Season 1.0 DVD could help.

The entire writing, acting, and production staffs agree the show improves drastically from here on out. Jane Espenson is out as head writer and the show took weeks out of production to rewrite scripts under new show runner Kevin Murphy.

The Season 1.5 premiere is directed by Eric Stoltz and is what David Eick calls "our 'Taxi Driver.'"

You can find preview clips here, but I don't like watching spoilers so I won't:

Caprica TV
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Old 09-30-2010, 09:01 PM   #57
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I've seen the first three or four eposides and it's a good series.

I am waiting to see if it survives the first season before getting involved with the story and watching the rest of it, though.
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Old 10-03-2010, 02:44 AM   #58
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I've seen the first three or four eposides and it's a good series.

I am waiting to see if it survives the first season before getting involved with the story and watching the rest of it, though.
I LOVED the first episode, the pilot, but if you enjoyed episodes 2 and 3, you'll enjoy the rest because episode 3 was among the worst, I feel, and you liked it. I'd just watch it, if I were you because I'm sure you'll be happy you did.

After the very good pilot, my favorites are "There Is Another Sky" (episode 5) and "Ghosts in the Machine" (episode 8), which come close to BSG quality.

We could use new viewers like yourself this month and the next to watch it live if you have a Nielsen box. Heck, even if you tell people you know about the show, it would be great. Without new viewers, this show is dead. And Season 1.5 promises to be even better!

Join us! (or should I say, "Keep joining us!")

Since you're a fellow Canadian (and, therefore, wouldn't have a Nielsen box, right?), you should know it'll be on Space at 10 pm Eastern this coming Tuesday and for the next several weeks. Reruns air at about 1 am Wednesday.

Buying the Season 1.0 DVD set will help, too!
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Old 10-03-2010, 06:53 AM   #59
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Appreciate it, I am living in the future currently, actually, and will just grab the series off the inter-tubes eventually. I don't really want to start watching the rest of the season until the fate of the series is decided.
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Old 10-14-2010, 02:49 PM   #60
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Appreciate it, I am living in the future currently, actually, and will just grab the series off the inter-tubes eventually. I don't really want to start watching the rest of the season until the fate of the series is decided.
Yeah, but you realize it's a vicious cycle. The fate of the series is decided by DVD sales and viewings. You can buy Season 1.0 now and help the show continue.
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