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Old 11-21-2007, 02:40 PM   #1
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Why no mention of Saudi rape victim???

Unless I've missed it why has no one brought up this horrendous case of a woman sentenced to 6 months in jail and 200 lashes for BEING A VICTIM OF RAPE!!! Of all the controversial stories out there why has it not been posted (or has it). And to make it worse what about the Bush administrations reaction to this ......
"State Department spokesman Sean McCormack avoided directly criticizing the Saudi Judicary over the case " THIS IS PART OF A JUDICIAL PROCEDURE OVERSEAS IN THE COURT OF A SOVEREIGN COUNTRY" - This just goes to show what HYPOCRITES the Bush Administration really is ...here is a hardcore facist Muslim country charging a woman for being raped - you'd think it would be the perfect reason to turn up the heat on Islam but no, they say absolutley FUCK ALL!!! Instead they go after the oil. I always said we should of bombed those motherfuckers into the stone age instead of focusing on Saddam etc... Saudi Arabia Sucks!!!
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Old 11-21-2007, 02:53 PM   #2
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I don't know if this is the same case I made a thread about a while ago, there are so many similar cases unfortunately. I absolutely agree with you about the Bush administration being hypocrites-if this case happened in Iraq they'd probably be jumping on it as a justification for still being there. I'm not for bombing them but it is completely unacceptable, obviously.

If anyone isn't aware of it...

(CNN) -- U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has added her condemnation to the sentence handed out to a Saudi rape victim -- 200 lashes and six-month jail term.

Calling the decision "an outrage", Sen. Clinton urged U.S. President George W. Bush to protest the decision to the Saudi authorities.

"The Bush administration has refused to condemn the sentence and said it will not protest an internal Saudi decision," the Democrat presidential frontrunner said in a statement.

"I urge President Bush to call on King Abdullah [of Saudi Arabia] to cancel the ruling and drop all charges against this woman."

The ruling relates to an incident in March 2006 when the woman, then aged 18 and engaged to be married, and an unrelated man were abducted from a mall in Qatif, Saudi Arabia, by a group of seven men. She was later raped.

The man and woman met so she could retrieve an old photo of herself from him, according to Abdulrahman al-Lahim, her lawyer, who cited phone records from the police investigation which claim that the man was trying to blackmail her. Al-Lahim says that the photo did not show his client in a compromising position.

In October, the men were convicted and sentenced to between two and nine years for the assault. She was convicted of violating the kingdom's strict Islamic law by not having a male guardian with her at the mall.

The woman was originally sentenced in October 2006 to 90 lashes -- but when she appealed, the court more than doubled her sentence to 200 lashes.

A court source told Arab News, an English-language Middle Eastern daily newspaper, that the woman's sentence was increased after the woman spoke to the media about the case.

But a Saudi Justice Ministry statement said the permanent committee of the Supreme Judicial Council recommended an increased sentence for the woman after further evidence came to light against her when she appealed her original sentence.

The case, which has sparked media scrutiny of the Saudi legal system, drew a strong reaction from Washington, where State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said U.S. officials had "expressed astonishment" at the sentence, though not directly to Saudi officials.

He said that it was "within the power of the Saudi government to take a look at the verdict and change it."

The woman's husband has said his wife is "a crushed human being," and blamed one judge with a personal vendetta -- and not the Saudi judicial system -- for treating her as a criminal.

But he said Saudi society respected women and he had faith that his wife would get justice.

The husband, who asked not to be named, spoke to CNN Senior Arab Affairs Editor Octavia Nasr, who translated his Arabic into English.

"From the outset, my wife was dealt with as a guilty person who committed a crime," he said. "She was not given any chance to prove her innocence or describe how she was a victim of multiple brutal rapes."

He said his wife is "a quiet, simple person who does not bother anyone," and too fragile to speak about the case. As her guardian, under Saudi law, he is standing up for her publicly.

The attack, trial and sentencing have taken a heavy toll on her already poor health, he added.

She suffers from anemia, a blood disorder , and asthma, he said, and will have surgery next month to remove her gallbladder.

"Since the attack, she's been suffering from severe depression."

The events ended her pursuit of an education beyond high school, he said. "Her situation keeps changing from bad to worse. You could say she's a crushed human being.

"The court proceedings were like a spectacle at times. The criminals were allowed in the same room as my wife. They were allowed to make all kinds of offensive gestures and give her dirty and threatening looks."

Of the three judges at the trial, one of them "was mean and from the beginning dealt with my wife as a guilty person who had done something wrong," he said.

"Even when he pronounced the sentence he said to her, 'You were involved in a suspicious relationship and you deserve 200 lashes for that'."

Al-Lahim, was dismissed by the judge after the two clashed in court, he said. "The judge took things personally and was reacting to our lawyer, who's a known human rights activist. The judge undermined the lawyer, decreased his role and then dismissed him from the case altogether. The judge simply couldn't work with our lawyer.

"We were shocked when the judgment changed and her sentence was doubled," the husband said, blaming the decision on a judge pursuing "a personal vendetta."

"We were looking for pardon; instead she got double the whipping and more jail time.

"If this sentence is based on the law then I would've welcomed it," he said. "But it is harsh and the Saudi society I know and belong to is more sympathetic than that. I do not expect such harshness from Saudis, but rather compassion and support of the victim and her rights.

"If a woman raises her voice to a man in public, it would be very unusual for the man to respond or argue," he said. "When a woman enters a bank for instance and there is no women's section, all the men make way for the woman to go ahead of them and get her business first. I would think that putting seven men in jail for rape shouldn't be difficult."

Despite the treatment given his wife by the Saudi judicial system, he believes his society respects human rights and he is optimistic about the future.

"Through this case, as a citizen and stemming from my sense of security and patriotism, I believe in the future... And I have faith and trust in the system," he said.

The case, which has sparked media scrutiny of the Saudi legal system, has drawn a strong international reaction.

Amri Chirouf, director of Middle East Research for Amnesty International, said: "There is no doubt that this is a direct result of the severe discrimination to which women is subjected in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia ... which includes at the heart of it denial of the right of the freedom of movement.

"Human rights are universal values, they're shared by all human beings. They're not to stop at frontiers, so they should be the concern of everyone."

Human Rights Watch said it has called on Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah "to immediately void the verdict and drop all charges against the rape victim and to order the court to end its harassment of her lawyer."

Al-Lahim has been ordered to attend a disciplinary hearing at the Ministry of Justice next month, where he faces a possible three-year suspension and disbarment, according to Human Rights Watch.

He told CNN he has appealed to the Ministry of Justice to reinstate his law license and plans to meet with Justice Minister Abdullah bin Muhammad bin Ibrahim Al Al-Sheikh.

"Currently she doesn't have a lawyer, and I feel they're doing this to isolate her and deprive her from her basic rights," he said. "We will not accept this judgment and I'll do my best to continue representing her because justice needs to take place."

He said the handling of the case is a direct contradiction of judicial reforms announced by the Saudi king earlier this month.

"The Ministry of Justice needs to have a very clear standing regarding this case because I consider this decision to be judiciary mutiny against the reform that King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz started and against Saudi women who are being victimized because of such decisions," he said.

Under law in Saudi Arabia, women are subject to numerous restrictions, including a strict dress code, a prohibition on driving and a requirement that they get a man's permission to travel or have surgery. Women are also not allowed to testify in court unless it is about a private matter that was not observed by a man, and they are not allowed to vote.

The Saudi government recently has taken steps toward bettering the situation of women in the kingdom, including the establishment earlier this year of special courts to handle domestic abuse cases, adoption of a new labor law and creation of a human rights commission.
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Old 11-21-2007, 04:41 PM   #3
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I actually only just read about it this morning.

Because our govts wouldn't dare do anything to upset the precious Saudis, everyone is being encouraged to en masse hassle their local Saudi embassy. Do it.
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Old 11-21-2007, 04:44 PM   #4
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Re: Why no mention of Saudi rape victim???

Quote:
Originally posted by Harry Vest
Instead they go after the oil. I always said we should of bombed those motherfuckers into the stone age instead of focusing on Saddam etc... Saudi Arabia Sucks!!!
This is equally as stupid as the Bush administration's actions.
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Old 11-21-2007, 04:44 PM   #5
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Fuck that status quo.
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Old 11-21-2007, 06:15 PM   #6
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Yes, MrsS had a thread about this case back in March.

The woman involved (and the ex-boyfriend she'd met with, who was also raped by the abductors and already took his 90 lashes) are being punished for having been alone together in the first place (khilwa), not for having been abducted and raped. That's been one of the most striking things about the public and media outrage over this case within Saudi Arabia--the horrid added twist of their having randomly become victims of a very serious crime while 'committing' a far lesser one has had the effect of throwing into unusually stark relief just how mercilessly invasive the khilwa laws are, and also how they contribute to perpetuating a reflexive blame-the-woman mentality towards all kinds of sexual crimes.

I'm not holding my breath for many other governments to speak out strongly against it however, as laws regulating these kinds of 'private' matters rarely attract sustained outside attention, and unfortunately such efforts are often reframed by radicals as 'cultural imperialism' to the extent that they occur.

"Bombing them into the Stone Age" would be most unlikely to help.
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Old 11-21-2007, 06:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by yolland


"Bombing them into the Stone Age" would be most unlikely to help.
After reading stories like the one above, I wonder if the Stone Age was all that bad: low carb diets, lots of exercise, casual dress...
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Old 11-21-2007, 07:22 PM   #8
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I usually can't read news stories with "rape" in the title.
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Old 11-21-2007, 07:26 PM   #9
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Saudi is one of the most repulsive nations on earth with respect to women's rights. But oil is more important to the west so that's why we'll just smile and look in the other direction.
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Old 11-21-2007, 09:37 PM   #10
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*elevation
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Old 11-22-2007, 12:02 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by anitram
Saudi is one of the most repulsive nations on earth with respect to women's rights.
I agree.

I'm inspired by the words of Martin Luther King, who said, "I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly. Never again can we afford to live with the narrow, provincial "outside agitator" idea.

What is your proposal for action?
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Old 11-22-2007, 12:35 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by AEON

What is your proposal for action?
Probably a lot more right-wing than you would imagine.

However, the issue here is that the Americans (and by proxy the West) have completely fucked up this region and I really question at this point how much could logistically be done there.

I could very easily get on board with regime change there...and I would have rather done that than the foray into Iraq. As things stand, I think it's pretty much a lost cause.

Until the oil runs out, at which point the Saudis will be as relevant as the beta VCR.
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Old 11-22-2007, 01:05 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by anitram


Until the oil runs out, at which point the Saudis will be as relevant as the beta VCR.
Maybe a course of action could be to fund development of alternative energy sources, maybe push that irrelevancy forward a bit.

But that won't happen as long as we have idiot oilmen running the country, now will it.
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Old 11-22-2007, 01:11 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by anitram




However, the issue here is that the Americans (and by proxy the West) have completely f****d up this region
Strange, I keep forgetting how peaceful and advanced the Middle East was before George W. was inaugurated.
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Old 11-22-2007, 01:14 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by martha


Maybe a course of action could be to fund development of alternative energy sources
Are you saying that we are not funding alternative energy sources? - Or that we are not funding them enough? And if were, then the mistreatment of Arab women would improve with the increased poverty?

I guess that's one way of tackling the issue...
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