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Old 09-12-2006, 01:35 PM   #1
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where you live does decide how long you live and when you die ...

[q]Where you live linked to life expectancy
Mon Sep 11, 8:05 PM ET

WASHINGTON - Where you live, combined with race and income, plays a huge role in the nation's health disparities, differences so stark that a report issued Monday contends it's as if there are eight separate Americas instead of one.

Asian-American women living in Bergen County, N.J., lead the nation in longevity, typically reaching their 91st birthdays. Worst off are American Indian men in swaths of South Dakota, who die around age 58 — three decades sooner.

Millions of the worst-off Americans have life expectancies typical of developing countries, concluded Dr. Christopher Murray of the Harvard School of Public Health.

Asian-American women can expect to live 13 years longer than low-income black women in the rural South, for example. That's like comparing women in wealthy Japan to those in poverty-ridden Nicaragua.

Compare those longest-living women to inner-city black men, and the life-expectancy gap is 21 years. That's similar to the life-expectancy gap between Iceland and Uzbekistan.

Health disparities are widely considered an issue of minorities and the poor being unable to find or afford good medical care. Murray's county-by-county comparison of life expectancy shows the problem is far more complex, and that geography plays a crucial role.

"Although we share in the U.S. a reasonably common culture ... there's still a lot of variation in how people live their lives," explained Murray, who reported initial results of his government-funded study in the online science journal PLoS Medicine.

Consider: The longest-living whites weren't the relatively wealthy, which Murray calls "Middle America." They're edged out by low-income residents of the rural Northern Plains states, where the men tend to reach age 76 and the women 82.

Yet low-income whites in Appalachia and the Mississippi Valley die four years sooner than their Northern neighbors.

He cites American Indians as another example. Those who don't live on or near reservations in the West have life expectancies similar to whites'.

"If it's your family involved, these are not small differences in lifespan," Murray said. "Yet that sense of alarm isn't there in the public."

"If I were living in parts of the country with those sorts of life expectancies, I would want ... to be asking my local officials or state officials or my congressman, 'Why is this?'"

This more precise measure of health disparities will allow federal officials to better target efforts to battle inequalities, said Dr. Wayne Giles of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which helped fund Murray's work.

The CDC has some county-targeted programs — like one that has cut in half diabetes-caused amputations among black men in Charleston, S.C., since 1999, largely by encouraging physical activity — and the new study argues for more, he said.

"It's not just telling people to be active or not to smoke," Giles said. "We need to create the environment which assists people in achieving a healthy lifestyle."

The study also highlights that the complicated tapestry of local and cultural customs may be more important than income in driving health disparities, said Richard Suzman of the National Institute on Aging, which co-funded the research.

"It's not just low income," Suzman said. "It's what people eat, it's how they behave, or simply what's available in supermarkets."



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Old 09-12-2006, 02:03 PM   #2
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low-income whites in Appalachia and the Mississippi Valley die four years sooner than their Northern neighbors.
From experience, I'm inclined to guess higher rates of alcoholism is the main reason for this. High rates of smoking, poor-nutrient-density diets and a tendency to avoid doctors probably contribute too, though I'd be less inclined to say these are regionally more common. Where I grew up at least (hmmm, lowest life expectancy of all states...although D.C.'s is lower) "Southern low-income rural blacks" didn't seem to have quite as many alcoholics, though there were plenty; on the other hand, their tendency to avoid doctors did seem stronger (think Tuskegee), and the dietary patterns applied there too.

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Old 09-12-2006, 02:10 PM   #3
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The Philadelphia area is in the green!

I think this makes a lot of sense from their explanation.
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Old 09-12-2006, 02:31 PM   #4
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Nutrition and weight (BMI) are more important

I got my BMI to a manageable place
From 25.4 overweight to 22.9 normal

And I am working hard on my diet choices

I feel much better
And everyone says I look better
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Old 09-12-2006, 02:55 PM   #5
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Originally posted by deep
And everyone says I look better

is such a thing possible?

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