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Old 06-28-2005, 04:40 AM   #1
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What is Bush going to talk about?

?
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Old 06-28-2005, 04:49 AM   #2
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When?
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Old 06-28-2005, 05:25 AM   #3
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I think he'll say...


freedom
democracy
stay the course

That about wraps it up.





In all seriousness, I don't see him saying anything new, I think he's desparate to get the support of the people and the support and moral for the troops.
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Old 06-28-2005, 05:26 AM   #4
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I hope he talks about how important it is to Make Poverty History.
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Old 06-28-2005, 05:42 AM   #5
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And why shouldn't he, this is the most crutial time in Iraq, staying the course until the drafting of the constituion and the elections at the end of the year, but that is an eternity away for the general public who's attention span barely lasts a week.
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Old 06-28-2005, 05:55 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by A_Wanderer
And why shouldn't he, this is the most crutial time in Iraq, staying the course until the drafting of the constituion and the elections at the end of the year, but that is an eternity away for the general public who's attention span barely lasts a week.
I think when you have Cheney saying the insurgency is at the end of it's life and Rummy saying it can last up to 12 years, telling the American public that an election is really going to change anything isn't enough.

I'm not saying we shouldn't stay the course but a few more answers may actually help him gain a little more support.
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Old 06-28-2005, 06:14 AM   #7
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Getting the message out is the biggest problem with this administration, it has utterly shithouse communication skills and that allows the agenda to be set every time by sound bytes and plain dumb statements.

If they could get the message that the US is not going to be there for 12 years, that training an indigeneous force to take over is the objective, it would make it slightly more clear.

They need to show that progress is being made, it is a pity that one has to rely on bloggers to pick up that slack in regards to the "boring" stuff like sewage plants, electricity quotas and deals for new infrastructure. The ongoing peaceful political dialogue, the disarming of militias and compromises with tribal leaders.

Training of the Iraqi security forces, it goes on without much coverage, but it is the key, because an Iraqi army fighting for Iraqi's will suceed in defeating any insurgency because they have the support of millions of Iraqi's. The US can hang around as long as it likes with minimal casualties (deaths and injuries on US soldiers in Iraq are small by historical standards) but it will not be able to totally defeat any insurgency.

The domestic insurgency has shown some serious signs of weakening, just look at the Shiite militias and the political solutions found to those problems, in the Sunni regions the same sort of compromises and accomidations are being made which will hopefully end the domestic insurgency. But this will not stop the Jihadists, for whom a free and stable Iraq would be a massive defeat, they will keep fighting even when the US leaves to bring about chaos.
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Old 06-28-2005, 06:41 AM   #8
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What BVS says.

Plus he'll mention evil-doers a couple of times.
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Old 06-28-2005, 06:44 AM   #9
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I predict castigation over his use of the term evil-doers as subjective followed by mockery of his pronunciation of the word "nuclear".
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Old 06-28-2005, 06:54 AM   #10
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i think he'll talk about how hard, (i mean, it is hard) it is to be president. and that he thinks about Iraq, like, *every day* and that he's working really hard, and it is hard, but progress is being made, but, people, it's *hard.*

freedom America freedom terror freedom democracy God.
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Old 06-28-2005, 06:59 AM   #11
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freedom America freedom terror freedom democracy God.

It is FYM.
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Old 06-28-2005, 08:42 AM   #12
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NY Times

June 28, 2005
The Speech the President Should Give
By JOHN F. KERRY


TONIGHT President Bush will discuss the situation in Iraq. It's long past time to get it right in Iraq. The Bush administration is courting disaster with its current course - a course with no realistic strategy for reducing the risks to our soldiers and increasing the odds for success.

The reality is that the Bush administration's choices have made Iraq into what it wasn't before the war - a breeding ground for jihadists. Today there are 16,000 to 20,000 jihadists and the number is growing. The administration has put itself - and, tragically, our troops, who pay the price every day - in a box of its own making. Getting out of this box won't be easy, but we owe it to our soldiers to make our best effort.

Our mission in Iraq is harder because the administration ignored the advice of others, went in largely alone, underestimated the likelihood and power of the insurgency, sent in too few troops to secure the country, destroyed the Iraqi army through de-Baathification, failed to secure ammunition dumps, refused to recognize the urgency of training Iraqi security forces and did no postwar planning. A little humility would go a long way - coupled with a strategy to succeed.

So what should the president say tonight? The first thing he should do is tell the truth to the American people. Happy talk about the insurgency being in "the last throes" leads to frustrated expectations at home. It also encourages reluctant, sidelined nations that know better to turn their backs on their common interest in keeping Iraq from becoming a failed state.

The president must also announce immediately that the United States will not have a permanent military presence in Iraq. Erasing suspicions that the occupation is indefinite is critical to eroding support for the insurgency.

He should also say that the United States will insist that the Iraqis establish a truly inclusive political process and meet the deadlines for finishing the Constitution and holding elections in December. We're doing our part: our huge military presence stands between the Iraqi people and chaos, and our special forces protect Iraqi leaders. The Iraqis must now do theirs.

He also needs to put the training of Iraqi troops on a true six-month wartime footing and ensure that the Iraqi government has the budget needed to deploy them. The administration and the Iraqi government must stop using the requirement that troops be trained in-country as an excuse for refusing offers made by Egypt, Jordan, France and Germany to do more.

The administration must immediately draw up a detailed plan with clear milestones and deadlines for the transfer of military and police responsibilities to Iraqis after the December elections. The plan should be shared with Congress. The guideposts should take into account political and security needs and objectives and be linked to specific tasks and accomplishments. If Iraqis adopt a constitution and hold elections as planned, support for the insurgency should fall and Iraqi security forces should be able to take on more responsibility. It will also set the stage for American forces to begin to come home.

Iraq, of course, badly needs a unified national army, but until it has one - something that our generals now say could take two more years - it should make use of its tribal, religious and ethnic militias like the Kurdish pesh merga and the Shiite Badr Brigade to provide protection and help with reconstruction. Instead of single-mindedly focusing on training a national army, the administration should prod the Iraqi government to fill the current security gap by integrating these militias into a National Guard-type force that can provide security in their own areas.

The administration must work with the Iraqi government to establish a multinational force to help protect its borders. Such a force, if sanctioned by the United Nations Security Council, could attract participation by Iraq's neighbors and countries like India.

The deployment of capable security forces is critical, but it alone will not end the insurgency, as the administration would have us believe. Hamstrung by its earlier lack of planning and overly optimistic predictions for rebuilding Iraq, the administration has failed to devote equal attention to working with the Iraqi government on the economic and political fronts. Consequently, reconstruction is lagging even in the relatively secure Shiite south and Kurdish north. If Iraqis, particularly Sunnis who fear being disenfranchised, see electricity flowing, jobs being created, roads and sewers being rebuilt and a democratic government being formed, the allure of the insurgency will decrease.

Iraq's Sunni neighbors, who complain they are left out, could do more to help. Even short-term improvements, like providing electricity and supplying diesel fuel - an offer that the Saudis have made but have yet to fulfill - will go a long way. But we need to give these nations a strategic plan for regional security, acknowledging their fears of an Iran-dominated crescent and their concerns about our fitful mediation between Israel and the Palestinians in return for their help in rebuilding Iraq, protecting its borders, and bringing its Sunnis into the political process.

The next months are critical to Iraq's future and our security. If Mr. Bush fails to take these steps, we will stumble along, our troops at greater risk, casualties rising, costs rising, the patience of the American people wearing thin, and the specter of quagmire staring us in the face. Our troops deserve better: they deserve leadership equal to their sacrifice.
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Old 06-28-2005, 10:09 AM   #13
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He has no credibility anymore.

It does not matter, much.

His barn storming for his crack pot Social Security Reform failed.


They have misrepresented or flat out lied too many times.


put a fork in him, he's done.






Quote:
THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary June 26, 2003

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT

United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture

Today, on the United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, the United States declares its strong solidarity with torture victims across the world. Torture anywhere is an affront to human dignity everywhere. We are committed to building a world where human rights are respected and protected by the rule of law.

Freedom from torture is an inalienable human right. The Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment, ratified by the United States and more than 130 other countries since 1984, forbids governments from deliberately inflicting severe physical or mental pain or suffering on those within their custody or control. Yet torture continues to be practiced around the world by rogue regimes whose cruel methods match their determination to crush the human spirit. Beating, burning, rape, and electric shock are some of the grisly tools such regimes use to terrorize their own citizens. These despicable crimes cannot be tolerated by a world committed to justice.

Notorious human rights abusers, including, among others, Burma, Cuba, North Korea, Iran, and Zimbabwe, have long sought to shield their abuses from


the eyes of the world by staging elaborate deceptions and denying access to international human rights monitors. Until recently, Saddam Hussein used similar means to hide the crimes of his regime. With Iraq's liberation, the world is only now learning the enormity of the dictator's three decades of victimization of the Iraqi people. Across the country, evidence of Baathist atrocities is mounting, including scores of mass graves containing the remains of thousands of men, women, and children and torture chambers hidden inside palaces and ministries. The most compelling evidence of all lies in the stories told by torture survivors, who are recounting a vast array of sadistic acts perpetrated against the innocent. Their testimony reminds us of their great courage in outlasting one of history's most brutal regimes, and it reminds us that similar cruelties are taking place behind the closed doors of other prison states.

The United States is committed to the world-wide elimination of torture and we are leading this fight by example. I call on all governments to join with the United States and the community of law-abiding nations in prohibiting, investigating, and prosecuting all acts of torture and in undertaking to prevent other cruel and unusual punishment. I call on all nations to speak out against torture in all its forms and to make ending torture an essential part of their diplomacy. I further urge governments to join America and others in supporting torture victims' treatment centers, contributing to the UN Fund for the Victims of Torture, and supporting the efforts of non-governmental organizations to end torture and assist its victims.

No people, no matter where they reside, should have to live in fear of their own government. Nowhere should the midnight knock foreshadow a nightmare of state-commissioned crime. The suffering of torture victims must end, and the United States calls on all governments to assume this great mission.
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Old 06-28-2005, 10:28 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by deep
He has no credibility anymore.

It does not matter, much.

His barn storming for his crack pot Social Security Reform failed.


They have misrepresented or flat out lied too many times.


put a fork in him, he's done.



oh, Deep, be nice.

it's really HARD to be president! did you hear that? he said it was hard work.

and he thinks about Iraq *every day.* he works on Saturdays too, and i hear he even came in on Sunday once.

you're just a Bush hater, as is everyone and anyone who holds a view contrary to our Dear Leader.
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Old 06-28-2005, 10:33 AM   #15
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Anytime I am listening to the radio (BBC Worldservice) and they have a clip where Bush talks, I turn it off. I can't stand listening to his lying, whining, good-ol-boy, bullshit blahblah any more. And I don't HAVE to. Man, I the OFF button.
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