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Old 03-03-2003, 09:01 AM   #1
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US plan to bug Security Council (From: FRANK KOZA, NSA)

From: FRANK KOZA, DEF Chief of Staff (Regional Targets)
CIV/NSA

Subject: Reflections of Iraq Debate/Votes at UN-RT Actions + Potential for Related Contributions

Quote:
As you've likely heard by now, the Agency is mounting a surge particularly directed at the UN Security Council (UNSC) members (minus US and GBR of course) for insights as to how to membership is reacting to the on-going debate RE: Iraq, plans to vote on any related resolutions, what related policies/ negotiating positions they may be considering, alliances/ dependencies, etc - the whole gamut of information that could give US policymakers an edge in obtaining results favorable to US goals or to head off surprises....
Full Article at:
http://www.observer.co.uk/iraq/story...905954,00.html

Also interesting to read:
Revealed: US dirty tricks to win vote on Iraq war

Quote:
Details of the aggressive surveillance operation, which involves interception of the home and office telephones and the emails of UN delegates in New York, are revealed in a document leaked...
(complete article at:http://www.observer.co.uk/iraq/story...905936,00.html
)

Is this Legal in the US or are all UN members considered as potential terrorists by the US Government?
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Old 03-03-2003, 09:35 AM   #2
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Whew.

This is close to an international Watergate. UN delegates spied by NSA. Why they don´t break into the headquarters? Because they don´t need to do that anymore in 2003.

Uh Oh. I wonder what Annan is thinking. Not only that the U.S. aren´t paying their membership fees, not only that they´re launching propaganda about ineffectivity of the UN bodies... now also spying the worlds top diplomats. This is getting ugly.

(Anyway, I never understood why the NSA wasn´t able to track down Bin Laden)
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Old 03-03-2003, 09:40 AM   #3
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old news.

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Old 03-03-2003, 12:31 PM   #4
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Old news, that I believe was proven to not be reliable???? I have to search for the article that came later in the day yesterday.
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Old 03-03-2003, 03:09 PM   #5
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Old 03-03-2003, 03:44 PM   #6
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Dreadsox: I'd be glad if it was wrong - haven't find anything more reliable than the Observer article yet.

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Old 03-03-2003, 06:37 PM   #7
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Report of plans by U.S. to spy on U.N. states questioned

From combined dispatches
LONDON — A British Sunday newspaper reported yesterday that the United States is waging a "secret" campaign to eavesdrop on U.N. Security Council delegations in New York in its battle to win votes in favor of war against Iraq.
The London Observer said it had obtained a memo describing what it called a "dirty tricks" surveillance operation that involves interception of the home and office telephone calls and the e-mail of U.N. delegates.
However, the authenticity of the memorandum was called into question and it was not clear from the text published by the newspaper that "secret" surveillance, interception of telephone calls and e-mail, or other extraordinary measures were suggested.
The Observer story was widely reported throughout the Middle East and Europe and could complicate U.S. and British efforts to win a new resolution in the Security Council.
The Observer said the memo was written by a top official at the National Security Agency (NSA), the U.S. agency that intercepts communications around the world, and circulated by e-mail to senior agents in the organization and to a friendly foreign intelligence agency.
The newspaper said the memo was directed at senior NSA officials and advises them that the agency is "mounting a surge" aimed at gleaning information not only on how delegations on the Security Council will vote on any second resolution on Iraq, but also "policies," "negotiating positions," "alliances" and "dependencies" — the "whole gamut of information that could give US policymakers an edge in obtaining results favourable to U.S. goals or to head off surprises."
The Observer identifies "Frank Koza" as chief of staff in the "Regional Targets" section of the NSA. Citing sources in Washington that it did not identify, the newspaper said the NSA initiative was backed by National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice and had sparked divisions within the Bush administration.
The newspaper said that it had shown the memo to three former intelligence operatives, whom it also did not identify, who judged its "language and content" as authentic. The newspaper also said it had confirmed that a man named Frank Koza does work for the NSA at a senior post in the "Regional Targets" division of the organization.
The memo's authenticity was questioned by Internet reporter Matt Drudge, who cited several misspellings — including the name of the memo's author — on the document as published by the Observer, and an incorrect version of the agency's "top secret" stamp.
Mr. Drudge, in an article posted on his Web site (www.drudgereport.com), noted that the memo used British spellings such as "favourable," "emphasise" and "recognise" instead of the American use of the letter "z" in the spellings, and that the spelling of the author of the memo was changed from "Frank Koza" to "Frank Kozu" on the Observer Web site (www.observer.co.uk)
The Observer posted a footnote late Sunday after receiving "many queries from the United States," saying it changed the spellings for the convenience of its British audience. The newspaper attributed other errors to typographical mistakes.
A later version of the Observer Web site spelled the author's name correctly as "Frank Koza," but printed it all in upper case, followed by three question marks.
The memo describes orders to staff at the NSA to step up surveillance "particularly directed at ... U.N. Security Council members" to provide up-to-the-minute intelligence on their voting intentions.
The memo, dated Jan. 31, makes clear that the targets of the heightened surveillance effort are the delegations from the so-called "middle six" delegations at the U.N. headquarters in New York, according to the British weekly. The six are Angola, Cameroon, Chile, Mexico, Guinea and Pakistan.
The United States, Britain and Spain have sponsored a new U.N. resolution declaring Iraq in noncompliance with earlier U.N. demands that it disarm, which would in effect authorize the use of force.
Nine votes are required to adopt the resolution to avoid a veto by one of the five permanent members: the United States, Britain, China, France and Russia. The United States and Britain are lobbying for support while France and Russia are lobbying to defeat the resolution without having to use their vetoes.
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Old 03-03-2003, 09:24 PM   #8
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Some how, this doesn't surprise me in the least. It could very well be true...Then again it could be a smear campaign by the very people who are trying to discredit the USA by all means possible....Nothing surprises me anymore....Well there are a few exceptions.
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Old 03-03-2003, 09:34 PM   #9
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I doubt The Observer would risk to do a smear campaign quoting the NSA.
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Old 03-03-2003, 10:04 PM   #10
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Right, the Guy spelled hisown name wrong.
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Old 03-04-2003, 02:41 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dreadsox
Right, the Guy spelled hisown name wrong.
Not that uncommon if you read some of the names here.

C ya!

Marty (who, outside of Viva El Feedback, never spells his name correctly on the forum)
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Old 03-04-2003, 04:59 AM   #12
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Dreadsox: it could be that the document was fax/paper and someone retyped it - however, i didn't see the version with the wrong Name and translating a document before printing it (even from US to GB english) seems possible.

France and German officals met also on differrent secured places because they were sure to be bugged - so the story could be right, could be also a fake

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Old 03-05-2003, 12:58 AM   #13
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it appears it is true.

Quote:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-snoop4mar04001448,1,7829917.story?coll=la%2Dheadlines%2Dworld
Purported Spy Memo May Add to U.S. Troubles at U.N.
'Top secret' document discusses bugging of council members. Forgery or no, some say it's nothing to get worked up about.
By Bob Drogin and Greg Miller
Times Staff Writers

March 4, 2003

WASHINGTON -- A long-standing U.S. practice of spying at the United Nations threatened Monday to create new woes for the Bush administration as it battles to win support for a resolution authorizing war against Iraq.

At issue was a "top secret" U.S. memo, published in a British newspaper, purporting to show that the National Security Agency has secretly eavesdropped on members of the U.N. Security Council in recent weeks for insights into their negotiating positions on Iraq.

White House and intelligence officials refused to confirm or deny the memo's authenticity, and some experts suspected that it could be a forgery, or "black propaganda," designed to undermine administration policy.

But current and former U.S. officials familiar with operations of the NSA, the huge U.S. intelligence agency in charge of eavesdropping and code breaking, said they don't doubt that Washington is spying on U.N. delegations during closed-door deliberations on Iraq. Indeed, intelligence experts say the practice dates from the U.N.'s founding in 1945.

"It would be inconceivable to me, with the interest of the nation's leadership on this set of issues, that we aren't using all available means to collect as much information as possible," one former official said.

He said the bugging allegation may spur foreign governments to take steps to shield their communications, cutting off U.S. policymakers from intelligence.

"Not only is it embarrassing, but ultimately it's compromising sources and methods," the former official said. "People will go out of their way to prohibit you from having success in the future."

Several of the Security Council members allegedly targeted for bugging -- including the "middle six" swing votes: Angola, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Chile, Guinea and Pakistan -- said the alleged U.S. surveillance revealed the high stakes of the upcoming decision on Iraq.

"If it were true, it would be a very serious matter," Cristian Maquieira, deputy ambassador of Chile, said of the memo.

But some were less than outraged.

Pakistan's ambassador, Munir Akram, said the report would not change the tenor of the negotiations.

"It goes with the territory," he said. "Anyone who thought that it wasn't going on is a bit naive.

"It is regarded as one of the privileges of the host country," he said with a smile.

At least one country seemed flattered.

Bulgaria's ambassador, Stefan Tavrov, said that having the U.S. eavesdrop on their missions was almost a mark of prestige for smaller countries. "It's almost an offense if they don't listen," he said. "It's integrated in your thinking and your work."

A U.S. government official with experience at the world body confirmed that American administrations long have relied on spying at the U.N., and not just during times of crisis.

"We've always done it," said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. "It's routine."

In addition to secretly intercepting telephone calls, e-mail, faxes and other private communications of foreign delegations at the Security Council and General Assembly, the official said, the NSA has targeted U.N. peacekeeping operation offices and other potentially sensitive parts of the U.N. bureaucracy.

"It's not dirty tricks," said Jeffrey Richelson, a senior fellow at the National Security Archive, a private research group on intelligence issues in Washington. "It's at worst standard intelligence collection. I'm sure we monitor communications of lots of U.N. delegations."

Indeed, James Bamford, author of two books on the NSA, said U.S. bugging at the U.N. dates to the 1945 conference at the San Francisco Opera House that led to the creation of the world body.

At the time, he said, U.S. Army code breakers secretly intercepted and translated thousands of coded telegraph messages between the foreign delegations and their distant capitals.

"The whole reason [President] Roosevelt was lobbying to put the U.N. in the U.S. was for ease of bugging," Bamford said.

Under government accords, the NSA doesn't spy on Britain, Canada, Australia or New Zealand. All other countries are considered legitimate targets.

The latest allegations concern a supposedly top-secret NSA memo, dated Jan. 21, that was leaked to the London Observer. The paper posted the text of the four-paragraph memo, not an actual copy, on its Web site.

The text indicates that U.S. intelligence is "mounting a surge," or concerted effort, to intercept communications from members of the Security Council, excluding Britain. The goal, the memo says, is to obtain "plans to vote on any related resolutions, what related policies/negotiating positions they may be considering, alliances/dependencies, etc -- the whole gamut of information that could give U.S. policymakers an edge in obtaining results favorable to U.S. goals or to head off surprises."

Spokesmen for the NSA and CIA declined to comment on the report Monday. Ari Fleischer, the White House press secretary, similarly refused to confirm or deny it.

Several former top intelligence officials said they were skeptical of the memo's authenticity. They said it includes some oddly informal phrasing, uncommon abbreviations and unnecessary parenthetical remarks.

Officials also noted the unusual use of the letters GBR, referring to Great Britain. U.S. government documents generally use "U.K." for United Kingdom or "H.M.G." for Her Majesty's Government.

"I've never seen in my time in government the British government referred to as the GBR," said Jeffrey H. Smith, who was general counsel at the CIA during the Clinton administration.

Smith said he had no firsthand knowledge of the memo's authenticity, but he noted that there is a long history of governments' using forgeries to create diplomatic difficulties for others.

"We used to plant so-called black propaganda all the time," Smith said. He told an anecdote from the 1960s, when the CIA forged a supposed exchange of letters between Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev and Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung to foment problems between the two communist countries. The letters were reported in the media, Smith said, but quickly discredited.

One expert said that U.S. law does not prohibit such spying programs and that a court order is not necessary to spy on diplomats.

International law also recognizes that nations engage in intelligence collection against other nations, including the interception and decryption of diplomatic communications, Smith said. "Nobody likes it," he said, "but everybody does it."

Congressional aides said there were no plans to hold hearings on the matter. To the contrary, one aide said, spying on foreign governments is an "unclassified stated mission" of the NSA.

"If they weren't doing it, then we could have a hearing," the aide said.

*
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Old 03-05-2003, 11:52 AM   #14
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Thanks Deep, interesting article too. So i guess it's probable that the NSA did it, but not proven - so innocent until proven guilty?

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Old 03-11-2003, 03:57 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by Klaus
so innocent until proven guilty?

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more evidence to support guilt?
Quote:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/iraq/bal-te.nsa11mar11,0,2413578.story?coll=bal-home-headlines

British intelligence employee questioned on NSA memo leak

Message revealed rise in spying on members of U.N. Security Council

By Scott Shane
Sun Staff

March 11, 2003





A British intelligence employee is under criminal investigation in connection with the leak of a National Security Agency memorandum calling for stepped-up eavesdropping on countries whose United Nations Security Council votes on Iraq could be crucial, police reported.

The investigation of a 28-year-old female employee of Government Communications Headquarters, known as GCHQ, appears to confirm the authenticity of the NSA memo printed last week in The Observer, a British newspaper.

An NSA spokesman declined to comment yesterday.

Inspector Richard Smith of the Gloucestershire Constabulary said the GCHQ employee, who lives near the agency's complex in Cheltenham, England, was arrested Wednesday and held overnight at a police station before being released on bail Thursday.

Smith said the employee, whom authorities declined to name, has not been charged but is being investigated "on suspicion of contravening the Official Secrets Act," the British statute protecting sensitive intelligence.

The Jan. 31 memo, marked "top secret" and sent by Frank Koza, described as chief of staff for "regional targets," said NSA had begun a "surge" of extra eavesdropping on communications by officials from Angola, Cameroon, Chile, Bulgaria, Guinea and Pakistan, all among the 15 members of the Security Council.

All the countries are being furiously lobbied by the United States to back the use of force against Iraq and by France to block or delay any war.

While the recipients of the electronic message were not revealed, it appeared to be directed to eavesdroppers at GCHQ or other closely cooperating foreign signals inteligence agencies. "We'd appreciate your support in getting the word to your analysts," it said.

When The Observer printed the memo March 2, several intelligence experts speculated that the memo might have been leaked to the British paper by a GCHQ officer unhappy with the U.S. push for war against Iraq.

The public reactions from the targeted countries ranged from mild complaint to a sort of jaundiced shrug, since most U.N. foreign officials are well aware that NSA engages in aggressive eavesdropping.

Pakistan's U.N. ambassador told reporters eavesdropping "is considered one of the privileges of the host country."

Still, the embarrassing leak of U.S. spying at such a sensitive time might add to the feeling overseas that the United States is bullying other countries to support a war, said James Bamford, author of two books on NSA.

"It's one more negative for the U.S.," he said. "It may push one or two delegations over the edge" into opposition to any U.S.-backed resolution on Iraq.

Daniel Ellsberg, the former National Security Council member indicted in 1971 for leaking the Pentagon Papers, said the NSA leak is important because it could influence a U.N. vote on an Iraq war, which he strongly opposes.

"This 'coalition of the willing' is actually a coalition of the bugged," he said.

Leaks related to NSA's highly classified eavesdropping are rare and considered damaging to U.S. intelligence because they can prompt the targets to begin encrypting communications or taking other steps to protect their secrets.

Sun staff writer Ariel Sabar contributed to this article.
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