US 2008 Presidential Campaign Thread - Part 2 - Page 59 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind > Free Your Mind Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-20-2007, 10:41 AM   #871
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 04:45 PM
The video below has been submitted for the Republican CNN YouTube debates by a couple whose son was killed because he was gay.

We're Lynn and Pat Mulder of Auburndale, Florida. Our son Ryan was murdered in March because he was gay. We would like to ask the presidential candidates how will they work to promote the value of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender families.


__________________

__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 11-20-2007, 10:58 AM   #872
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 04:45 PM
NY Post

November 18, 2007 -- You know what we need in the White House? A bitch.

We need a bitch facing down terrorists, Iran and Congress. A bitch to order around the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Come to think of it, there's a bitch right now trying to save Pakistan. Golda Meir, Queen Elizabeth, Margaret Thatcher - all great leaders. All bitches.

It's unlikely, of course, that the voter who asked John McCain “how we going to beat the bitch?" this week in South Carolina considered this. She meant it as an insult, and McCain, stupidly or ignorantly, called it a good question. When asked about it, Sen. Trent Lott, classy guy that he is, said, “the witch?"

My advice for Hillary Clinton? Take it as a compliment. I'm a bitch and proud - a Babe In Total Control of Herself.

The reality is that every woman who has ambition, business acumen and an independent way of thinking - the very qualities we admire in men - has been called a bitch.

It's sad the word needs to be used at all, considering how insulting it is. A female dog. When you actually think about what the term means, what it implies, it's amazing how much it's slipped into regular conversation. Rappers toss it off in lyrics; Britney introduces herself on her new album with the term; they don't even bother bleeping it out on television. Despite what Isiah Thomas said in his sex harassment deposition, no one - black or white - should be able to say it.

That a woman would be the one to ask the question of McCain shows how robbed of import “bitch" has become, otherwise she would have realized how the term could boomerang. If the voter can call Clinton a bitch, it's license for others to do the same to her.

If we can't stamp it out, then we must embrace it. Ten years ago, Meredith Brooks had a hit singing “I'm a bitch," and since then, smart women have known that a man who calls them a bitch is only demonstrating his own inadequacies.

Case in point: Hillary herself, who wisely said nothing during the McCain debacle. In proper form, she subscribed to the Hollywood axiom, “No audience, no show." She's nobody's poodle.

But if I may, let me offer some more advice to Clinton - a little etiquette for bitches, if you will:

Remember that each time you are called a bitch on the campaign trail, you are helping women across America. As long as they are calling you a bitch, it means that some other poor woman is getting a break from being called one.

Lead with compassion for your male counterparts. Many still suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder and night sweats, even though it's been decades since the feminist movement.

Never let them get under your skin. And if they do, never give them the satisfaction of knowing it.

Wear skirts often. It'll flummox them even more.

And one final word from the trenches. Being a woman who is running for office is sometimes threatening to those who aren't used to seeing women be productive outside the kitchen and the laundry room. The good news is, they'll adjust. Ain't that a bitch?

Sherry Argov is the author of “Why Men Marry Bitches."
__________________

__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 11-20-2007, 11:27 AM   #873
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Canadiens1131's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 10,363
Local Time: 05:45 PM
Wow, so Huckabee has a Chuck Norris Facts campaign ad. I, I really don't know what to say.
__________________
Canadiens1131 is offline  
Old 11-20-2007, 11:28 AM   #874
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 04:45 PM

In other news Hasselhoff has endorsed Mitt Romney
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 11-20-2007, 01:32 PM   #875
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 04:45 PM
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) - Presidential hopeful Barack Obama on Tuesday told high school students that when he was their age he was hardly a model student, experimenting with illegal drugs and drinking alcohol.

Obama stopped by a study hall at Manchester Central High School and answered students' questions about the war in Iraq and his education plan. But when an adult asked about his time as a student, Obama spoke bluntly.

"I will confess to you, I was kind of a goof-off in high school. My Mom reminds me of that," said Obama, an Illinois Democrat who grew up in Hawaii

"You know, I made some bad decisions that I've actually written about. You know, got into drinking. I experimented with drugs," he said. "There was a whole stretch of time that I didn't really apply myself a lot. It wasn't until I got out of high school and went to college that I started realizing, 'Man, I wasted a lot of time.'"

Obama has written about his drug use in his memoir, "Dreams from My Father."

"Junkie. Pothead. That's where I'd been headed: the final fatal role of the young would be black man," Obama wrote. Mostly he smoked marijuana and drank alcohol, Obama wrote, but occasionally he would snort cocaine when he could afford it.

Drugs, Obama wrote, were a way he "could push questions of who I was out of my mind, something that could flatten out the landscape of my heart, blur the edges of my memory."

Obama told students he developed his sense of social justice at college—he attended Occidental College in Los Angeles for two years before transferring to Columbia University in New York. Before he got to Columbia, he said, he lived a naive life.

"I went to high school in Hawaii, so there was a lot of opportunity to goof off because the weather is really good all the time," he said. "I did well in school, but I didn't really apply myself. I did what I needed to do to get into college and it came fairly easily to me."

His biggest interest was in sports and girls.

"I was big on basketball. We were state champs. I thought I was better than I was," said Obama, who finds time on the campaign trail to still play a pickup game.

He then added: "I thought about girls a lot, I won't lie."
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 11-20-2007, 05:44 PM   #876
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 04:45 PM
WASHINGTON (AP) - Democrats and Republicans alike have strong opinions about who has the best chance of capturing the presidency in 2008 - Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani, that is - but that's not necessarily the candidate they'd rather go bowling with, take along on a family vacation or even vote for.

An in-depth survey of more than 2,000 people offers a window into the thinking of Americans as they look far beyond electability in making their choices for president - grappling with matters of personality, policy and religion in sorting through the candidates.

Overall, the poll finds, Democrats are weighing personal traits more heavily than policy positions this election season; Republicans are putting greater emphasis on policy. The survey by The Associated Press and Yahoo News is a departure from traditional polling in that it will track the opinions of the same people across the country as their beliefs develop and change through the campaign.

The interplay of the personal and the political doesn't always make for neat and tidy decision-making.

Take self-described die-hard Republican Donald Stokes. The 48-year-old steelworker from Waterbury, Conn., would pick Democrat John Edwards if he could take a candidate along on his family vacation. He likes Edwards' personality and his family values. But he supports Giuliani for president, largely because of the former New York mayor's leadership after the 9-11 terror attacks in 2001.

"I'd rather have a president that's going to get in somebody's face if he's got a problem with them or another country," says Stokes.

Charolette Thompson, a 48-year-old retired landscaper from Federal Way, Wash., is a Democrat backing Barack Obama for president. But she would probably pick "the Mormon guy" - that would be Republican Mitt Romney - for a bowling partner.

Jasmine Zoschak, a 30-year-old physician's assistant from Milford, Pa., would love to see a woman in the White House - "just not the female that's running this year." She's backing Republican Mike Huckabee for president because of his positive outlook and opposition to abortion, but she'd rather invite Obama to dinner.

In this first gut-check of the polling series, the voters signaled there's still hope for candidates playing catchup: Half of likely Democratic voters said they could change their minds about who should win their party's nomination, as did two-thirds of Republicans.

Ask Democrats to size up their party's candidates on personal qualities, and it's easy to see why Clinton is leading national polls of Democrats. She is the candidate most often seen as strong, experienced, decisive, compassionate. Looking for strength, for example, 78 percent of Democrats see the quality in Clinton, 61 percent find it in Obama, 56 percent in Edwards.

The picture is less clear-cut when it comes to ethics and honesty, where Clinton and Obama run about even.

Which Democrat is judged the most likable? None has a clear advantage among Democratic voters, with Clinton, Obama and Edwards running about even. Among all voters, however, Obama has the edge.

It is a measure of how polarizing Clinton can be that she is the both the voters' favored bowling or vacation companion and the one most often ruled out.

Irene Soria, a 60-year-old Democrat from Tulare, Calif., says she's backing Clinton because "she knows how to play Washington. ... The other two, Edwards and Obama, seem kind of weak to me."

Likability, Soria says, is over-rated. A lot of people thought they could have a beer with George W. Bush, she said, but "look at all the things he's done to the United States. He hasn't done much good."

When Republican voters size up the GOP candidates, Giuliani claims the advantage on a host of personal qualities. He is the GOP candidate most often seen as decisive, strong and compassionate. But, just as for Clinton, ethics and honesty are a potential soft spot. Some 59 percent of GOP voters see Sen. John McCain as ethical, compared with 54 percent for Giuliani, 45 percent for Fred Thompson and 42 percent for Romney. On honesty, McCain and Giuliani run about even.

Which Republican is the most likable? Giuliani gets the nod, both from GOP voters and among voters overall.

Hold a sheer popularity contest, pitting the most likable Democrat vs. the best-liked Republican, and it would be Obama over Giuliani, 54 percent to 46 percent.

Ask voters which qualities are most important, though, and they put likability well down the list. They attach far more importance to being honest, ethical, decisive and strong.

The AP-Yahoo News survey, conducted by Knowledge Networks, also asked voters to shine the spotlight in the other direction, to evaluate some of their own qualities.

It turns out that supporters of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee are the most likely to be happy. Huckabee has a relatively high proportion of support among Evangelicals, who tend to be happier than most people.

Among Democrats, supporters of Obama and Edwards are more likely to say they are very happy than are Clinton's backers. Her supporters include more lower-income and less-educated voters, who tend to be less happy.

The voters do own up to some reservations about the age, gender and religion of certain candidates, but some also manage to swallow their concerns. Nearly 60 percent of 71-year-old John McCain's supporters say they have at least some reservations about supporting a candidate who is over 70. About 30 percent of Romney's supporters have qualms about voting for a Mormon. Fifteen percent of those who support thrice-married Giuliani have reservations about someone who is divorced.

On the Democratic side, 7 percent of Clinton's supporters report some reservations about voting for a woman.

The numbers show a significant share of respondents resisting the pack mentality. Fully half of Obama's supporters and a third of Edwards' backers think Clinton is the Democrat with the best chance of winning next November. On the Republican side, a third or more of the voters supporting McCain, Thompson and Romney think Giuliani has a better chance of winning.

Who would win right now? When an unidentified Democratic nominee is pitted against an unidentified Republican, the Democrat gets 42 percent of voters, the Republican 27 percent and another 27 percent don't know who they'd vote for.

The survey of 2,230 adults was conducted Nov. 2-12 by Knowledge Networks and had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 2.1 percentage points. The survey included 1,049 Democrats, for whom the margin of sampling error was plus or minus 3 points, and 827 Republicans, for whom the margin of sampling error was plus or minus 3.4 points. Unlike most Internet polls, this one is nationally representative because people are first contacted using traditional telephone polling methods, and are then followed using online interviews. People selected for the study who do not already have Internet access are provided with Internet access for free.
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 11-20-2007, 06:36 PM   #877
Blue Crack Addict
 
Moonlit_Angel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: In a dimension known as the Twilight Zone...do de doo doo, do de doo doo...
Posts: 19,256
Local Time: 03:45 PM
Yeah, I never got the whole thing of voting for somebody based on whether or not you could hang out with them, either. Much as I love my family and friends, and enjoy hanging out with them, I wouldn't look to most of them when thinking about who our next president should be.

I'm glad that people seem to be focusing more on the issues and the candidates' leadership abilities this time around...hopefully that will come through in the election next year.

Angela
__________________
Moonlit_Angel is offline  
Old 11-20-2007, 06:58 PM   #878
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 04:45 PM
examiner.com

DeLay Knocks GOP: ‘The leadership just isn’t getting it’
November 20

Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay may not be in a leadership position on Capitol Hill anymore, but that doesn't mean he can't weigh in on the current GOP leadership.

DeLay told Yeas & Nays that Republicans in Congress are "looking for something to believe in" and "they're not getting it out of this Republican leadership. … The leadership just isn't getting it."

"They're looking for some backbone," said DeLay, who also chimed in on the 2008 election. He said the Republican party is "going to get our clocks cleaned in 2008" and unequivocally said that "Hillary [Clinton] will be the next president." Which ought to give DeLay’s newest projects, the Coalition for a Conservative Majority and a consulting firm called First Principles, LLC, plenty to do.

DeLay gave us is his dour assessment at a book party for former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton, which was held at the Georgetown home of former Republican National Committee Chairman Ken Mehlman
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 11-21-2007, 10:00 AM   #879
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 04:45 PM
Chicago, IL — Rudy Giuliani declared that Americans should not expect a “pretense of perfection” from candidates running for office and says he respects Barack Obama’s “honesty” for discussing his previous drug use with a group of high schoolers today.

The Illinois Senator is receiving criticism from Mitt Romney, among others, for opening up and discussing past mistakes during a town hall at a Manchester, NH High School Tuesday.

“I made some bad decisions that I’ve written about, there were times when I got into drinking and experimented with drugs.. there was a whole stretch of time when i didn’t really apply myself a lot,” Obama told the group.

Giuliani said he believes Obama’s topic of conversation was completely appropriate.

“I respect his honesty in doing that. I think that one of the things we need from our people who are running for office is not this pretense of perfection,” Giuliani said. “The reality is all of us that run for public office, whether its governor, legislator, mayor, president–we are all human beings. If we haven’t made mistakes don’t vote for us cause we got some big ones that are gonna happen in the future and we wont know how to handle them.”

The former NYC mayor has been forthright about admitting his own mistakes during the campaign–most recently dogged by his connection to indicted former NYC Police Commissioner Bernie Kerik–even noting in two recent television ads that he is not perfect.

But fellow Republican contender Mitt Romney feels differently, saying Obama committed a “huge error.”

“It’s just not a good idea for people running for President of the United States who potentially could be the role model for a lot of people to talk about their personal failings while they were kids because it opens the doorway to other kids thinking, ‘well I can do that too and become President of the United States,’” Romney told an Iowa audience today. “I think that was a huge error by Barack Obama…it is just the wrong way for people who want to be the leader of the free world.”
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 11-21-2007, 11:05 AM   #880
Blue Crack Addict
 
verte76's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: hoping for changes
Posts: 23,331
Local Time: 09:45 PM
Yeah, likeability is overrated. George Bush seems like a friendly enough guy, but he's a terrible president.
__________________
verte76 is offline  
Old 11-21-2007, 11:08 AM   #881
Blue Crack Addict
 
verte76's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: hoping for changes
Posts: 23,331
Local Time: 09:45 PM
I think it was good that Obama was honest about himself.
__________________
verte76 is offline  
Old 11-21-2007, 03:25 PM   #882
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
coemgen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Black and White Town
Posts: 3,962
Local Time: 04:45 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
The Illinois Senator is receiving criticism from Mitt Romney, among others, for opening up and discussing past mistakes during a town hall at a Manchester, NH High School Tuesday.

But fellow Republican contender Mitt Romney feels differently, saying Obama committed a “huge error.”

“It’s just not a good idea for people running for President of the United States who potentially could be the role model for a lot of people to talk about their personal failings while they were kids because it opens the doorway to other kids thinking, ‘well I can do that too and become President of the United States,’” Romney told an Iowa audience today. “I think that was a huge error by Barack Obama…it is just the wrong way for people who want to be the leader of the free world.”
This is how many of the Mormon's I've met think though - they have to appear to be perfect. That has to get old. None of us are. I think the way Obama phrased it as a "waste of time," was wise. That goes above the whole "drugs are bad, kids" phrase and gives them more of a long-term perspective.
__________________
coemgen is offline  
Old 11-21-2007, 03:28 PM   #883
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
coemgen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Black and White Town
Posts: 3,962
Local Time: 04:45 PM
Looks like Obama is gaining some ground.

Time: Is Obama's Iowa surge for real?
http://www.time.com/time/politics/ar...te-cnn-partner

CNN.com: Poll: Clinton's lead shrinks in New Hampshire
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/11/....nh/index.html
__________________
coemgen is offline  
Old 11-21-2007, 05:04 PM   #884
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Tempe, Az USA
Posts: 12,856
Local Time: 02:45 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by verte76
Yeah, likeability is overrated..
Tell that to Gore and Kerry
__________________
diamond is offline  
Old 11-21-2007, 05:12 PM   #885
Resident Photo Buff
Forum Moderator
 
Diemen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Somewhere in middle America
Posts: 13,234
Local Time: 03:45 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
C
Giuliani said he believes Obama’s topic of conversation was completely appropriate.

“I respect his honesty in doing that. I think that one of the things we need from our people who are running for office is not this pretense of perfection,” Giuliani said. “The reality is all of us that run for public office, whether its governor, legislator, mayor, president–we are all human beings. If we haven’t made mistakes don’t vote for us cause we got some big ones that are gonna happen in the future and we wont know how to handle them.”
Wow. It's not often I find myself agreeing with what Rudy Giuliani has to say.
__________________

__________________
Diemen is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com