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Old 11-02-2007, 08:05 PM   #586
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Rudy is an Iron Horse

Ask his ladies.

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Old 11-04-2007, 11:50 AM   #587
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Comedic relief:

http://www.breitbart.tv/?p=7603


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Old 11-04-2007, 11:58 AM   #588
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That was great...I loved Gravel


Also I just saw a DraftGore.com TV ad. Interesting.
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Old 11-05-2007, 09:53 AM   #589
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Poll Finds Americans Pessimistic, Want Change
War, Economy, Politics Sour Views of Nation's Direction

By Dan Balz and Jon Cohen
Washington Post Staff Writers
Sunday, November 4, 2007; A01

One year out from the 2008 election, Americans are deeply pessimistic and eager for a change in direction from the agenda and priorities of President Bush, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

Concern about the economy, the war in Iraq and growing dissatisfaction with the political environment in Washington all contribute to the lowest public assessment of the direction of the country in more than a decade. Just 24 percent think the nation is on the right track, and three-quarters said they want the next president to chart a course that is different than that pursued by Bush.

Overwhelmingly, Democrats want a new direction, but so do three-quarters of independents and even half of Republicans. Sixty percent of all Americans said they feel strongly that such a change is needed after two terms of the Bush presidency.

Dissatisfaction with the war in Iraq remains a primary drag on public opinion, and Americans are increasingly downcast about the state of the economy. More than six in 10 called the war not worth fighting, and nearly two-thirds gave the national economy negative marks. The outlook going forward is also bleak: About seven in 10 see a recession as likely over the next year.

The overall landscape tilts in the direction of the Democrats, but there is evidence in the new poll -- matched in conversations with political strategists in both parties and follow-up interviews with survey participants -- that the coming battle for the White House is shaping up to be another hard-fought, highly negative and closely decided contest.

At this point, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (N.Y.), the Democratic front-runner, holds the edge in hypothetical match-ups with four of the top contenders for the Republican nomination. But against the two best-known GOP candidates, former New York mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and Sen. John McCain (Ariz.), her margins are far from comfortable. Not one of the leading candidates in either party has a favorable rating above 51 percent in the new poll.

And while Clinton finds herself atop all candidates in terms of strong favorability -- in the poll, 28 percent said they feel strongly favorable toward her -- she also outpaces any other candidate on strong unfavorables. More than a third, 35 percent, have strongly negative views of her, more than 10 points higher than any other contender.

Overall, the public's sour mood is evident not only in the desire for a change in direction but also in assessments of those who control the reins of power in Washington. For the fourth consecutive month, Bush's approval rating remains at a career low. Thirty-three percent said they approve of the job he is doing, and 64 percent disapprove. Majorities have disapproved of Bush's job performance for more than 2 1/2 years.

In follow-up interviews, people were quick to find fault with what they see in Washington and to express their desire for something different. "I think Bush has been extremely polarizing to the country," said Amber Welsh, a full-time mother of three young children who lives in Davis, Calif. "While I think it started before Bush, I think Bush has pushed it even further. I think the next president needs to be one who brings us together as a country."

Democrats can take little comfort in Bush's numbers, however. A year after voters turned Republicans out of power in the House and the Senate, approval of the Democratic-controlled Congress's performance is lower than the president's rating, registering just 28 percent. That is the lowest since November 1995, when Republicans controlled Congress and the capital was paralyzed in a budgetary fight that shut down the government.

Congressional Democrats now fare just slightly better. Only 36 percent of those surveyed approve of the way they are handling their jobs, down sharply from April when, 100 days into the new Congress, 54 percent said they approved.

Whatever their dissatisfaction with the Democrats, however, a majority of Americans, 54 percent, said they want the party to emerge from the 2008 election in control of Congress; 40 percent would prefer the GOP to retake power. One reason is that 32 percent approve of congressional Republicans, and in a series of other measures it becomes clear that the eventual Republican nominee for president may be burdened by a tarnished party label in the general election.

Thirty-nine percent of Americans said they now have a favorable impression of the Republican Party, lower than at any point since December 1998, when Republicans were in the midst of impeachment proceedings against then-President Bill Clinton.

Among the GOP rank and file, Republican favorability has fallen 15 percentage points since March 2006 (from 93 percent to 78 percent). It has dropped 19 points among independents, whose support for Democratic candidates in last year's midterm elections contributed significantly to GOP losses in the House and the Senate.

Only 23 percent of those surveyed said they want to keep going "in the direction Bush has been taking us," and the appetite for change is as high as it was in the summer of 1992, in the lead-up to Bill Clinton's defeat of President George H.W. Bush. It is significantly higher than it was in the summer of 2000 or the fall of 1988.

"We're in a terrible mess," said Jay Davis, who works on computers for an insurance company and lives in Portland, Maine. "The war is an incredible mistake, and it becomes more and more obvious. The economy is just being propped up with toothpicks."

Jo Wright, a retired Episcopal priest from Vinita, Okla., said, "It just seems that after these eight years most people think there's got to be a change, and I'm with them."

Greg Coy, a 911 dispatcher who lives in Shippensburg, Pa., is less pessimistic about the overall state of the country than Davis or Wright, but he is unhappy with both the president and Congress. He voted for Bush in 2000 and 2004, but he said: "If he came up again [for reelection], I wouldn't vote for him. The last year I think he's dropped something, and I'm not sure what it is."

Coy also offered a broader indictment of a political system he sees as gridlocked by partisanship. "Here's the problem with this country," he said. "Just because it's a Republican idea, Democrats don't like it, and because it's a Democratic idea, Republicans don't like it. The Congress should go with what works for this country. We have gotten away from that."

Justin Munro, a contractor from Reading, Pa., offered a less widely held view of Bush's policies and the direction of the country. "I'm pretty confident that time will prove that maybe going into Iraq was the right thing to do," he said. He also believes that Bush has not gotten enough credit on the economy: "I think we'll look back on that, too, and see that the tax cuts were the right thing to do."

At this stage, three issues dominate the electoral landscape, with the war in Iraq at the top of the list. Nearly half of all adults, 45 percent, cited Iraq as the most or second-most important issue in their choice for president. About three in 10 cited the economy and jobs (29 percent) or health care (27 percent). All other issues are in the single digits.

Iraq is tops across party lines, but Democrats are twice as likely as Republicans to highlight health care as one of the two most important issues for 2008 (34 percent to 16 percent). Health-care concerns peak among African Americans: Twenty percent called it the election's most important issue, and 38 percent said it is one of the top two.

While 12 percent of Republicans and 10 percent of independents cited immigration as one of the top two issues, it was highlighted by 3 percent of Democrats. Terrorism is also a more prominent concern among Republicans; 17 percent put it in their top two, while 3 percent of Democrats did the same.

The Democratic Party holds double-digit leads over the GOP as the party most trusted to handle the three most frequently cited issues for 2008: Iraq, health care and the economy. The Democratic advantages on immigration and taxes are narrower, and the parties are at rough parity on terrorism, once a major Republican strong point.

There are other signs suggesting that the political landscape has become less favorable to Republicans than it was at the beginning of Bush's presidency. By 50 percent to 44 percent, Americans said they favor smaller government with fewer services over bigger government with more services -- long a key Republican argument. But support for smaller government is significantly lower than it was before both the 2000 and 2002 elections.

In the new poll, support for allowing same-sex civil unions is up significantly from 2004. A majority of respondents, 55 percent, now support giving homosexual couples some of the legal rights of married heterosexuals.

There is a more even divide on another hot-button issue: Fifty-one percent would support a program giving illegal immigrants now living in the United States the right to live here legally if they pay a fine and meet other requirements; 44 percent would oppose that.

Strategists in both parties agree on the overall shape of the political landscape a year from the 2008 election, but they differ as to how voters will ultimately register their desire for change.

Democratic pollster Stan Greenberg said an electorate that took out its anger on Republicans a year ago remains mad, with the hostility still focused on the president's party.

Republican pollster Neil Newhouse said, "It is a political environment pretty heavily tilted toward the Democrats." One hope, he added, is that an early end to the GOP nominating battle will allow the winner time "to put the current administration in the rearview mirror, placing the focus on the nominee's candidacy and agenda."

Still, strategists on both sides foresee another close election. "The biggest dynamic is that people want change from the policies of the Bush administration," said Mark Penn, Hillary Clinton's chief strategist. But he added that "it's not a clear path" to victory for the Democrats, noting that no Democratic nominee has won 50 percent of the general-election vote since Jimmy Carter in 1976.

Stuart Stevens, a media adviser to former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, said no Republican candidate will argue next year that the country is in great shape, but he discounted the effectiveness of running against Bush in the fall of 2008. "A year from now, it's not going to be a referendum on President Bush, it's going to be a choice between two candidates," he said.

Much will happen in the coming months that could reshape the political climate. But at this point, in a matchup of current front-runners, Clinton and Giuliani are tightly paired: 50 percent of respondents would support Clinton, 46 percent Giuliani. Against McCain, Clinton has a clearer edge, 52 percent to 43 percent. She has even larger advantages over former senator Fred D. Thompson of Tennessee (16 points) and Romney (18 points), both of whom remain undefined in the eyes of many voters.

In each of these potential contests, Clinton has a big edge among women. In a head-to-head with Giuliani, 56 percent of women would back Clinton, and 40 percent would vote for Giuliani. By contrast, men would tilt toward Giuliani 51 percent to 44 percent.

Independents, who fueled the Democratic takeover of Congress last November, are evenly divided, 47 percent for Clinton, 46 percent for Giuliani. The split is one indicator that, despite current Democratic advantages and an electorate strongly oriented toward change, the 2008 election is likely to be closely and hotly contested.

The Post-ABC poll was conducted by telephone Oct. 29 to Nov. 1 among a random sample of 1,131 adults, and includes additional interviews with randomly selected African Americans for a total of 203 black respondents. The results from the full poll have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus three percentage points.
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Old 11-05-2007, 10:07 AM   #590
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What kind of interview was that? Can we see it? Oy vey. I admit I wish I saw it, they have some video. Gotta love a guy who talks about his wife in such a way.

http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/i_vi...ml?id=3444170n

This morning, Democratic presidential hopeful Dennis Kucinich and his wife, Elizabeth, appeared on the CBS "Early Show." And the Ohio Representative seemed none too happy when anchor Hannah Storm brought up his wife's age, beauty, and jewelry. Here's a portion of the transcript:

Hannah Storm: You have a core group of supporters for your political views, but a lot of people [are] talking about your wife and the fact that she's over three decades younger and she statuesque and beautiful and has a pierced tongue. What do you make of the attention on her?

Dennis Kucinich: Well, the most important thing I would tell you, Hannah, as a professional, is it's important not to trivialize a woman who has worked on international humanitarian matters, you know, helping people in Africa get access to energy and to housing and education, helping poor people and children in India, working with a group connected with Mother Teresa, working with the Mission To Seafarers in London. Here's a woman of great accomplishment with a Master's degree in international conflict resolution, and I hope that you're going to talk about more than a tongue stud.

After Storm asked Elizabeth Kucinich what she would bring to the White House, the "Early Show" anchor returned to the topic.

Hannah Storm: I know that your husband doesn't want to focus on your tongue ring, but you do have one, correct?

Elizabeth Kucinich: I do.

Hannah Storm: And would you remove it if you became first lady or leave it in?

Elizabeth Kucinich: It's part of me now. It's been there ten years, so --

Hannah Storm: Can we see it?

Elizabeth Kucinich: No, you can't. Sorry.

Dennis Kucinich: That's my privilege.


Check out the video for the full effect. It's not quite as tense as it seems when you read it – during that last exchange, it's worth noting, all three are laughing.

Still, things stayed interesting until the end. After Elizabeth Kucinich pointed out that Dennis is "polling fourth now" and Dennis added, "when I get to third place, everything changes," Storm responded: "When you get to third place, or you meet with [Iranian President Mahmoud] Ahmadinejad, we'll have you back."

To which Dennis Kucinich responded, one finger in the air: "You know, remember you said that."
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Old 11-05-2007, 10:50 AM   #591
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One year from today, Rudy Giuliani will be the President-elect of the United States.

Just thought I'd share.
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Old 11-05-2007, 10:59 AM   #592
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what kind of interview was that? she had the chance to speak with such a cool woman and she asked about her tongue ring? ridic.
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Old 11-05-2007, 11:40 AM   #593
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Quote:
Originally posted by 2861U2
One year from today, Rudy Giuliani will be the President-elect of the United States.

Just thought I'd share.
and America would suffer because of this...

Let's all hope not.
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Old 11-05-2007, 10:14 PM   #594
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Quote:
Originally posted by 2861U2
One year from today, Rudy Giuliani will be the President-elect of the United States.

Just thought I'd share.
if this is the road he takes to get the nomination and win the election

would it matter, to you?


Quote:
Strategists for Rudy Giuliani are quietly preparing a significantly race-based campaign strategy to strengthen support among socially conservative white voters, in the South as well as in the North. […]

The themes the campaign are lining up for renewed emphasis are those reflecting Giuliani’s confrontational stance towards black New Yorkers and their white liberal allies, as well as his record of siding decisively with the police against minorities who launched protests alleging police brutality during the years he was mayor from 1994-2001.

Giuliani’s eight years as New York’s chief executive exemplified a Northern adaptation of the GOP’s politically successful “Southern strategy” - the strategy playing on white resistance to and resentment of federal legislation passed in the 1960s mandating desegregation - resistance that produced a realignment in the South and fractured the Democratic loyalties of white working class voters in the urban North from 1968 to 2004.
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Old 11-05-2007, 11:24 PM   #595
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Quote:
Originally posted by 2861U2
One year from today, Rudy Giuliani will be the President-elect of the United States.

Just thought I'd share.
I sincerely hope you are wrong about that. Count me among the Americans from that article who want a change, and now. I do agree that the Democrats are really going to have to step up their game and prove that they will be better for this country than the Republicans. They can't cave into the Republicans' demands and jabs and stuff, they need to stick up for themselves and fight it out to the end. Once they do that, I think that'll help greatly. I just know that I'm sick to death of the Republican party the way it is now. I don't want another 4 to 8 years of someone who follows in the footsteps of Bush. I really, really don't.

As for the interview with Kucinich and his wife, I'm with unico-come on, the interviewer seriously chose to talk about his wife's tongue ring? Who cares, really? I dunno if you're aware of this, "Early Show", but there's this thing called a presidential race going on, and Kucinich is part of that and stuff, so shut up about the tongue ring and discuss the more important issues at hand. Sheesh.

Angela
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Old 11-05-2007, 11:39 PM   #596
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Ron Paul raised $3.8 million today. That's pretty damn impressive.

EDIT: AP is reporting more than $4.2 million.
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Old 11-06-2007, 08:25 AM   #597
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Well that's, um, interesting

COLUMBIA, South Carolina (CNN) — Two prominent supporters of Sen. Barack Obama's presidential campaign in South Carolina called state Democratic Party officials urging them to oppose putting comedian Stephen Colbert's name on the primary ballot, according to party officials and Obama supporters with knowledge of the calls.

Colbert, the host of Comedy Central's "Colbert Report," saw his hopes to be placed on the primary ballot ended last week when the South Carolina Democratic Party executive council voted 13-3 to block his bid, with the majority of voters saying he was not a viable enough candidate to be included in the primary.

At least one member of the executive council, who requested anonymity, told CNN he felt "pressured" by former State Superintendent of Education Inez Tenenbaum to oppose Colbert from being placed on the ballot.

Tenenbaum is a high-profile supporter of Obama. Her endorsement of Obama in April was touted by the campaign, and she has appeared at several Obama campaign events, including the opening of one of their campaign headquarters this summer. Obama campaigned for Tenenbaum in South Carolina when she ran for Senate in 2004.

"She said it wouldn't be fair to the other candidates. That he [Colbert] wouldn't be sincere. That he was only running in one state," said the executive council official.

The official added: "The Obama people, they just didn't want him at all."

Tenenbaum disagreed with the characterization that she lobbied to keep Colbert off the ballot for political reasons.

"I think lobbying was too strong a word," she said in an interview with CNN. "I called them to see what they were thinking, and if they had made up their mind. I am a volunteer in that campaign, and so I am not a staffer. And I thought it could have taken votes away from a lot of people."

Another Obama endorser who regularly appears at campaign events, state Rep. Bakari Sellers, also made phone calls to members of the party's executive council about Colbert, according to Sellers.

"I placed the calls as a concerned Democrat, realizing that we are a country in despair," Sellers told CNN. "It is not a time for games or to make a mockery of the process."

Given the lopsided vote of the executive council against Colbert, it's unclear if the calls had significant bearing on Colbert's fate as a bona fide presidential candidate.

But the calls raise questions about the Obama supporters' motives, given their close ties to the campaign and the fact that Colbert and Obama both draw support from a similar demographic.

"A lot of Obama's support is among younger, college-educated folks, and a lot of Colbert's watchers are younger, college-educated folks," said Scott Huffmon, a political scientist at Winthrop University.

"I understand that Obama might potentially lose some voters," said Huffmon, who also noted that having Colbert on the ballot would likely bring in new primary voters rather than take them from other candidates. "But in a race where every vote counts it's a valid concern."

The Obama campaign denied any connection to the phone calls.

"Democrats in South Carolina, including supporters of ours, had strong feelings on both sides of the ballot issue and ultimately it was South Carolina Democrats who made this decision," said Obama's South Carolina communications director Kevin Griffis.

According to members of the executive council, Tenenbaum also called council member Jim Lander, the former South Carolina Comptroller General, as well as another member of the executive council who refused to be identified but said he was confident Tenenbaum was not calling on behalf of Obama's campaign.

The party officials called by Sellers did not return calls from CNN.

Tenenbaum said her quarrel with having Colbert's name on the ballot was pragmatic rather than political. In deciding which candidates to allow in the primary, the state Democratic Party also had to consider that for every name on the ballot, they would have to pay $20,000 to the state election commission.

"The whole thing is just the money," said Tenenbaum, who said she is currently fundraising for the party. "He did not meet the criteria … It's all in fun and let's just leave it at that."

According to state party rules, for a candidate to be placed on the ballot, he or she must demonstrate national viability as well as spend time campaigning in the state.

The three members of the executive council who voted in favor of putting Colbert on the ballot were state Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter of Orangeburg; Charles Hamby, former chairman of the Oconee County Democratic Party; and Lumus Byrd of Laurens County.

The Columbia-based lawyer who represented Colbert in his bid to be placed on the ballot, Dwight Drake, is a supporter of Sen. Hillary Clinton. Drake has told CNN in the past he was initially contacted directly by Colbert's surrogates to assist in the comedian’s bid.

As for Colbert, he issued a statement late Monday declaring that his campaign is officially over.

"I am shocked and saddened by the South Carolina Democratic Executive Council's 13-to-3 vote to keep me off their presidential primary ballot," Colbert said. "Although I lost by the slimmest margin in presidential election history–only ten votes–I have chosen not to put the country through another agonizing Supreme Court battle. It is time for this nation to heal.

"I want say to my supporters, this is not over. While I may accept the decision of the Council, the fight goes on! The dream endures! … And I am going off the air until I can talk about this without weeping."
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Old 11-06-2007, 08:29 AM   #598
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Washington Post

For Hillary Clinton, Surprising Celebrity Ties

By Amy Argetsinger and Roxanne Roberts
Friday, November 2, 2007

Startling new information suggests a secret connection between Hillary Rodham Clinton and our era's most controversial, charismatic and polarizing women:

Madonna, Angelina Jolie and Camilla Parker-Bowles -- they're all her cousins.

Not that they've hung out at many reunions together. HRC and Madge are 10th cousins, who share the same great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandparents, according to research by Washington genealogist William Addams Reitwiesner. The Democratic front-runner is ninth cousin once removed to Prince Charles's wife, while Jolie is her ninth cousin twice removed.

Reitwiesner is the Library of Congress employee whose research formed the basis for our blockbuster story on how Fred Thompson and Elvis Presley are eighth cousins once removed (explains a lot) and made headlines with the discovery that Barack Obama is descended from slave owners. He declined to comment about the Hillary kin, but made his work available on his Web site ( http://www.wargs.com).

Clinton's connection to all three women comes via 17th century French ancestors who made their way to Quebec before drifting south. Speaking of Canadians: Celine Dion and Alanis Morissette -- Clinton's tenth cousins once removed. Though when you go back that far, we probably all are.
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Old 11-06-2007, 10:04 AM   #599
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Quote:
Originally posted by 2861U2
One year from today, Rudy Giuliani will be the President-elect of the United States.

Just thought I'd share.
Gosh, I hope not.
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Old 11-06-2007, 04:00 PM   #600
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Michael H on the rise:

Huckabee: Jesus Still Important

Tuesday, November 6, 2007 12:57 PM

By: Newsmax Staff Article Font Size



Speaking at a Dallas-area church, Republican presidential hopeful Mike Huckabee eschewed campaign rhetoric and instead spoke about Jesus, his religious convictions, and a United States that is “the result of divine intervention.”

Addressing the congregation of the 28,000-member Prestonwood Baptist Church in Plano, Tex., on Sunday, Huckabee — an ordained Southern Baptist minister — said his faith does not guarantee him political success or wealth, but it gives him confidence in the outcome of his life, the Dallas Morning News reported.

“If you lose everything but you still have Jesus, you have what you need,” Huckabee said. “If you’re with Jesus Christ, we know how it turns out in the final moment. I’ve read the last chapter in the book, and we do end up winning.”

Huckabee urged the church to pray for America, which he believes was not the result of “human wisdom” but instead was “the result of divine intervention.”

At a press conference in Plano, the candidate said: “There is not a disconnect between strong faith and good government. In fact, I’d like to believe there is a wonderful connection.”
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