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Old 10-17-2007, 07:13 PM   #346
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this just in...

Quote:
Lynne Cheney: Uncomfortable with Hillary

By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press Writer1 hour, 4 minutes ago

Lynne Cheney says she would be uncomfortable with Hillary Rodham Clinton as president — and wishes the Democratic front-runner were more like her own husband.

"It makes me uncomfortable," she said. "I kind of like politicians that are more in the Dick Cheney mold."

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071017/...Kaj0sr5CGWwvIE
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Old 10-17-2007, 07:20 PM   #347
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Breaking news flash: wife prefers her husband to another woman.

In other news, cats and mice don't like each other, men prefer drinking beer to shopping and kids like candy.
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Old 10-18-2007, 09:08 AM   #348
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She's so cute





COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - Dogged by suggestions he's too old to be president, John McCain often says he should bring his mother to campaign stops to demonstrate his good genes. On Wednesday he did.

"I am so happy to be here. I think I'm going to cry," 95-year-old Roberta McCain said as she introduced her son to about 200 seniors at a retirement community. She said three generations of McCain women are supporting his campaign.

The 71-year-old Arizona senator told the crowd Medicare was set to go broke in 2019.

"I would also remind you that Social Security is going to go broke as well," he said, pointing to a chart. He said older voters owe it to their children and grandchildren to fix the problems.

McCain is trying to raise his profile on a two-day swing through the state. Despite his loss of momentum in the summer amid a financial meltdown, people are no longer quick to write him off - especially here, where he remains popular among older Republicans and those with military ties.
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Old 10-18-2007, 09:56 AM   #349
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Kansas Sen. Sam Brownback on Friday will end his bid for the Republican presidential nomination, the AP reports
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Old 10-18-2007, 09:58 AM   #350
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^ Yeah, I just now saw that. I heard he was going to quit if he didn't come in at least 4th in Iowa, but apparently money was a big problem for him.
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Old 10-18-2007, 03:59 PM   #351
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Quote:
Huckabee: campaign finance system will lead to plutocracy


By HOLLY RAMER
Thursday, October 18, 2007 11:41 AM CDT

RINDGE, N.H. - Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Thursday that a "prohibit nothing, disclose everything" approach to campaign financing may be the best way to prevent wealth alone from determining who becomes president.



The Republican presidential hopeful spoke at a Rotary Club meeting, where he was asked bluntly by an audience member whether he has enough money to compete for his party's nomination.

Huckabee conceded the obvious _ he doesn't have as much as his rivals _ and turned the answer into an attack on the current system, which he said works to keep candidates like him behind in the money race.

He said the campaign finance law co-authored by one of his rivals _ Arizona Sen. John McCain _ has deformed rather than reformed the system and is moving the nation toward a plutocracy.

"We will end up with a ruling class and servant class and we will ruin the middle class," he said. "We will make it so politics will become the domain of the extraordinarily wealthy."
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Old 10-18-2007, 05:23 PM   #352
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While I can agree with him on this part, I'm not really unhappy that he is prevented from becoming president partly due to this system.
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Old 10-18-2007, 06:59 PM   #353
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This is interesting

http://www.10questions.com/
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:49 AM   #354
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WASHINGTON (AP) -- Religious and cultural conservatives, a political force skeptical of the leading Republican presidential candidates, are caught in a tug of war between pragmatism and ideology.

"My head and my heart are fighting with each other," said Phil Burress, an Ohioan who has lobbied hard for federal and state bans on gay marriage.

The vexing choices facing these voters:

• Rudy Giuliani, a thrice-married New Yorker who differs with them on abortion, gays and guns but who polls show offers a strong chance to beat a Democrat next fall.

• Mitt Romney, a Mormon from Massachusetts who didn't entirely share their views in the past but who insists he now does.

• Fred Thompson, a Tennessean who hasn't been a vocal champion of their core issues but who had a right-leaning Senate voting record.

• John McCain, an Arizona senator who has a clear socially conservative resume but who dismissed their leaders "agents of intolerance" in 2000.

• Mike Huckabee, a Southern Baptist minister and true believer who has an extraordinary hill to climb for the nomination.

For now, social-issue conservatives are scattered across the field of candidates.

It's a splintering that is, perhaps, more severe than in previous presidential elections and that raises questions about the power of a long-influential part of the GOP base. The restiveness has prompted talk of a possible third-party bid, a certain political death knell for the GOP nominee.

Reflecting the quandary these voters face, Focus on the Family's James Dobson has rejected Giuliani and has panned both McCain and Thompson. Romney is the only leading candidate Dobson hasn't denounced -- but he hasn't publicly backed Romney either.

"There's no one Republican presidential candidate that inspires them, and the movement leaders can find fault in one way or another with all the candidates," said John Green, a senior fellow at the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. "It's hard to tell if it means that their influence is waning. But they're likely to have more influence if they stay united. The longer they stay behind several candidates, the less influence they'll have."

While the ultimate impact of these religious and cultural conservatives on the GOP nomination race is anyone's guess, there's no question that they are a force in numbers. VideoWatch religious leader's take on '08 candidates »

A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 43 percent of Republicans say social issues will be very important in deciding how to vote in 2008, and another 31 percent call issues like abortion and marriage somewhat important.

Associated Press-Ipsos polls show that nearly two-thirds of Republicans consider themselves conservative, with Thompson and Giuliani getting about equal support from that group while McCain and Romney trail.

Roughly one in five conservatives, churchgoers and Christian evangelicals are undecided.

Thompson has a slight edge over Giuliani among the half of all Republicans who attend weekly religious services as well as among those who call themselves born-again Christians. McCain and Romney lag in both categories.

The White House hopefuls will make their pitches this weekend to a few thousand "values voters" gathering in Washington for a summit sponsored by the Family Research Council, a conservative advocacy group.

Uncertainty about a consensus candidate -- and anxiety over the possibility of nominating Giuliani -- serves as a backdrop.

"Our heads are telling us that we've got to settle for someone that can win even if he's not the closest to our values. I've decided that I can't do that. I've got to go with my heart," said Burress, who says he's leaning toward Huckabee but has not committed.

Some fear that if they stay divided as a group, their power will be diluted and they will, in effect, be handing the nomination to the antithesis of what they believe -- Giuliani.

"We have to reconcile the tension between pure principle and pure pragmatism," said John Stemberger, an Orlando lawyer and a leading social conservative in Florida who says he has not chosen a candidate. "If we vote on pure principle, we forfeit the opportunity to influence policy through politics. If we vote on pure pragmatism, then we sell our souls to the man."

Some are trying to see a silver lining in the lack of a favored candidate.

"It's important to have our people in as many different campaigns as possible so our issues aren't lost," said Kelly Shackelford, president of the Free Market Foundation in Texas who isn't backing any one person yet.

As the summit opens, attendees will watch for the fallout from several recent developments:

• Influential social conservative leaders met privately in Salt Lake City to weigh their options if Giuliani wins the nomination. They overwhelmingly approved a resolution pledging to support a minor-party candidate if the Democratic and Republican nominees back abortion rights, and discussed possibly creating a third party. The group meets again Saturday in Washington.

• Giuliani, the former New York mayor who backs abortion and gay rights, won the support of two anti-abortion Republicans, including Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Romney, who once backed abortion rights but has reversed himself, earned the endorsement of Bob Jones III, the chancellor of a Christian fundamentalist school in South Carolina.

• Thompson entered the race late and, thus far, has failed to emerge as the conservative white knight his backers had promised. He posted an advertisement on conservative Web sites this week criticizing Romney and Giuliani on values issues. "Fred Thompson. The REAL Conservative," it declares.

• Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas, a darling of the religious right, decided to drop out of the race after his campaign failed to catch on. That leaves his supporters searching for a candidate, and at least two competitors -- Huckabee and McCain -- hoping for Brownback's endorsement.
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Old 10-19-2007, 10:15 AM   #355
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Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Religious and cultural conservatives, a political force skeptical of the leading Republican presidential candidates, are caught in a tug of war between pragmatism and ideology.

"My head and my heart are fighting with each other," said Phil Burress, an Ohioan who has lobbied hard for federal and state bans on gay marriage.

The vexing choices facing these voters:

• Rudy Giuliani, a thrice-married New Yorker who differs with them on abortion, gays and guns but who polls show offers a strong chance to beat a Democrat next fall.

• Mitt Romney, a Mormon from Massachusetts who didn't entirely share their views in the past but who insists he now does.

• Fred Thompson, a Tennessean who hasn't been a vocal champion of their core issues but who had a right-leaning Senate voting record.

• John McCain, an Arizona senator who has a clear socially conservative resume but who dismissed their leaders "agents of intolerance" in 2000.

• Mike Huckabee, a Southern Baptist minister and true believer who has an extraordinary hill to climb for the nomination.

For now, social-issue conservatives are scattered across the field of candidates.

It's a splintering that is, perhaps, more severe than in previous presidential elections and that raises questions about the power of a long-influential part of the GOP base. The restiveness has prompted talk of a possible third-party bid, a certain political death knell for the GOP nominee.

Reflecting the quandary these voters face, Focus on the Family's James Dobson has rejected Giuliani and has panned both McCain and Thompson. Romney is the only leading candidate Dobson hasn't denounced -- but he hasn't publicly backed Romney either.

"There's no one Republican presidential candidate that inspires them, and the movement leaders can find fault in one way or another with all the candidates," said John Green, a senior fellow at the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. "It's hard to tell if it means that their influence is waning. But they're likely to have more influence if they stay united. The longer they stay behind several candidates, the less influence they'll have."

While the ultimate impact of these religious and cultural conservatives on the GOP nomination race is anyone's guess, there's no question that they are a force in numbers. VideoWatch religious leader's take on '08 candidates »

A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 43 percent of Republicans say social issues will be very important in deciding how to vote in 2008, and another 31 percent call issues like abortion and marriage somewhat important.

Associated Press-Ipsos polls show that nearly two-thirds of Republicans consider themselves conservative, with Thompson and Giuliani getting about equal support from that group while McCain and Romney trail.

Roughly one in five conservatives, churchgoers and Christian evangelicals are undecided.

Thompson has a slight edge over Giuliani among the half of all Republicans who attend weekly religious services as well as among those who call themselves born-again Christians. McCain and Romney lag in both categories.

The White House hopefuls will make their pitches this weekend to a few thousand "values voters" gathering in Washington for a summit sponsored by the Family Research Council, a conservative advocacy group.

Uncertainty about a consensus candidate -- and anxiety over the possibility of nominating Giuliani -- serves as a backdrop.

"Our heads are telling us that we've got to settle for someone that can win even if he's not the closest to our values. I've decided that I can't do that. I've got to go with my heart," said Burress, who says he's leaning toward Huckabee but has not committed.

Some fear that if they stay divided as a group, their power will be diluted and they will, in effect, be handing the nomination to the antithesis of what they believe -- Giuliani.

"We have to reconcile the tension between pure principle and pure pragmatism," said John Stemberger, an Orlando lawyer and a leading social conservative in Florida who says he has not chosen a candidate. "If we vote on pure principle, we forfeit the opportunity to influence policy through politics. If we vote on pure pragmatism, then we sell our souls to the man."

Some are trying to see a silver lining in the lack of a favored candidate.

"It's important to have our people in as many different campaigns as possible so our issues aren't lost," said Kelly Shackelford, president of the Free Market Foundation in Texas who isn't backing any one person yet.

As the summit opens, attendees will watch for the fallout from several recent developments:

• Influential social conservative leaders met privately in Salt Lake City to weigh their options if Giuliani wins the nomination. They overwhelmingly approved a resolution pledging to support a minor-party candidate if the Democratic and Republican nominees back abortion rights, and discussed possibly creating a third party. The group meets again Saturday in Washington.

• Giuliani, the former New York mayor who backs abortion and gay rights, won the support of two anti-abortion Republicans, including Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Romney, who once backed abortion rights but has reversed himself, earned the endorsement of Bob Jones III, the chancellor of a Christian fundamentalist school in South Carolina.

• Thompson entered the race late and, thus far, has failed to emerge as the conservative white knight his backers had promised. He posted an advertisement on conservative Web sites this week criticizing Romney and Giuliani on values issues. "Fred Thompson. The REAL Conservative," it declares.

• Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas, a darling of the religious right, decided to drop out of the race after his campaign failed to catch on. That leaves his supporters searching for a candidate, and at least two competitors -- Huckabee and McCain -- hoping for Brownback's endorsement.

I think this could really shake up the Religious Right, and I love that. I have no problem with them having their particular opinions on issues, no matter how strongly I disagree, but I've just been repulsed as a Christian (who's about as far from the Christian Right as possible) by what I've seen from them lately. The absolute arrogance and lust for power that comes from so many Christian Right leaders makes me sick. There are obviously leaders on the Left that act in similar fashion, but I've never noticed it anywhere near as much as I have with the Right. The way they're acting with the Republican nominees is almost pathetic. It reminds me of parents witholding approval from their rebellious teenager. "If you don't comply with my rules, you can't have the car keys." Obviously, every group, from every political spectrum will not endorse a candidate who doesn't share their values, but to blackball an entire party is absolutely ridiculous. I can only hope that this will lead to the Democratic nominee having an easier path to the presidency. I've just been more and more disillusioned with what I've seen from the Christian Right. This election HAS to show them that they can't make their morals law. This attitude of "If we can't get you to adopt our morality by screaming at you from church pulpits, we'll make it illegal for you to take any other moral action" needs to stop. They're destroying their own credibility, that of their political party, and most importantly, that of Jesus. I don't even know what to say anymore.
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Old 10-19-2007, 10:25 AM   #356
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We need public campaign finance reform
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Old 10-19-2007, 07:12 PM   #357
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Nicely said, U2isthebest . I think it's an absolute shame that these are the Christians who get the media attention. They think they speak for everyone, but they clearly don't. Thankfully, though, there are quite a few other people out there who I know are just as fed up with the religious right as you and I. So here's hoping that the religious right get that message loud and clear in this next election.

Angela
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:38 PM   #358
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Quote:
Originally posted by Moonlit_Angel
Nicely said, U2isthebest . I think it's an absolute shame that these are the Christians who get the media attention. They think they speak for everyone, but they clearly don't. Thankfully, though, there are quite a few other people out there who I know are just as fed up with the religious right as you and I. So here's hoping that the religious right get that message loud and clear in this next election.

Angela
Thank you! And spot on with all you said too!
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Old 10-21-2007, 10:35 AM   #359
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The religious right disgusts me.
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:18 PM   #360
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thehill.com

Perkins: Giuliani supports marriage amendment
By Sam Youngman
October 20, 2007

Tony Perkins, head of the Family Research Council, told The Hill Saturday that former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani (R) would support a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage.

Perkins said Giuliani told him in a private meeting that if the Defense of Marriage Act appeared to be failing or if multiple states began to legalize same-sex marriages, then he would support the constitutional amendment.

Giuliani did not mention the amendment or the issue of gay marriage during his address to the Values Voters Summit, but that position could win him favor with some social conservatives who view the former mayor warily.

Perkins said that was not enough to assuage his concerns about Giuliani, but “it was nice to hear.”

From the New York Times, 8/4/01:

For the past two months Rudolph Giuliani has been coming home at night to one of the happiest marriages in New York.

That's how long the mayor, in flight from his own marital wreckage at Gracie Mansion, has been a frequent sleepover guest at the home of Howard Koeppel and his partner, Mark Hsiao. Mr. Koeppel, who is 64, is a Queens car dealer who has been both a close friend and prodigious fund-raiser of Mr. Giuliani's since 1989. The 41-year-old Mr. Hsiao is a Juilliard-trained pianist who works at the city's Department of Cultural Affairs. They've been together almost 10 years -- are registered with the city as domestic partners -- and in happier times for the Giuliani marriage, double-dated with the mayor and Donna Hanover on New Year's Eve. Now they are doting hosts to Mr. Giuliani as he juggles his raucous divorce, his recovery from prostate cancer treatments, his waning months in office, his romance with Judith Nathan, his post-public-life future and, last but hardly least, his search for an affordable Manhattan apartment rental of his own.

The mayor's progressive record on gay civil rights notwithstanding, he has not endorsed same-sex marriage. But, says Mr. Koeppel, ''He did tell us that if they ever legalized gay marriages, we would be the first one he would do.'' Mr. Koeppel and Mr. Hsiao are in favor of the right to marry -- which, among other things, would give gay couples the same protections as heterosexual couples in legal and fiscal matters ranging from immigration and adoption rights to veterans' and Social Security benefits.
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