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Old 01-26-2008, 03:16 PM   #916
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I am becoming more and more convinced the GOP is down to McCain or Romney


and Romney has a real shot
of getting the nomination

and even if Mitt is the GOP candidate

the Nov election will be closer
than many believe


Quote:
Romney camp highlights McCain's ties to Dems


(CNN) — John McCain says he is the Democrats' worst nightmare, but Mitt Romney begs to differ.

In a new Web ad released Friday, Romney's campaign is highlighting McCain's willingness to work across the aisle, and his strong relationships with some Senate Democrats.

It also features news reports that claim he considered joining John Kerry on the Democratic ticket in 2004. The Arizona senator has denied those reports.

The ad is the latest effort from the Romney campaign to portray McCain as too willing to work with Democrats, and comes just four days before the Florida Republican Primary — a contest that shuts out independent voters, whose support has been crucial to McCain's earlier victories in New Hampshire and South Carolina.

On Thursday, McCain's campaign released a Web ad noting the Arizona senator's name was frequently invoked at the CNN Democratic Debate, and claimed he was the “Democrats' worst nightmare” in a general election matchup.
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Old 01-26-2008, 05:42 PM   #917
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Quote:
Originally posted by deep
I am becoming more and more convinced the GOP is down to McCain or Romney
I find Mitt to be really, really fake. He's as see through as a cheap piece of crystal.

That said, I watched him talk about the economy today. I disagreed with his policies but he sounded very impressive, and you most certainly got the sense he knew what he was talking about. I never get that feeling with McCain, who keeps droning on about Iraq.

Maybe this helps Mitt, maybe not. But it's the only time I've ever heard him speak where I had some modicum of respect for him.
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Old 01-26-2008, 06:15 PM   #918
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Quote:
Originally posted by deep
I am becoming more and more convinced the GOP is down to McCain or Romney


and Romney has a real shot
of getting the nomination

and even if Mitt is the GOP candidate

the Nov election will be closer
than many believe


A few weeks ago I thought that unless we nominated McCain, we had no shot of winning. But more and more I'm likely our chances with Romney, too. I think he could beat Hillary. He'd probably lose to Obama but it would be very close.
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Old 01-26-2008, 07:13 PM   #919
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Quote:
Originally posted by anitram


. But it's the only time I've ever heard him speak where I had some modicum of respect for him.

perhaps there is hope for Canada..

dbs
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Old 01-27-2008, 09:08 AM   #920
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Obama: Press 'Manically Focused on Race'
Says He's Not Just 'The Black Candidate' And Campaign Toll on His Personal Life Is Worth It

Jan. 26, 2008—

Heading into the Democratic primary in South Carolina, Sen. Barack Obama is banking on a win. He also says the media is making race more of an issue that it actually is.

"The press has been focused, almost, you know, maniacally, on the issue of race, here in South Carolina. But, as we move forward after this contest, I'm very confident that we are going to continue to build the kinds of coalitions that we've been seeing all across the country," Obama told "Good Morning America Weekend" anchor Kate Snow.

In recent weeks, media coverage of the Democratic primaries has been dominated by issues of race.

Today voters go to the polls in South Carolina, where the issue is perhaps most relevant, as African-American voters made up 47 percent of the vote in the 2004 Democratic primary.

"Here in South Carolina, there's a sizeable African-American population; not surprisingly, I'm & doing well there. I'm sure they're taking pride in my candidacy," Obama said.

"The Black Candidate"

The junior senator from Illinois dismissed the notion raised in the media that he has been marginalized, in the words of Associated Press writer Ron Fournier, as "the black candidate, by the Clinton machine." Obama instead pointed to his past successes in white-dominated areas.

"I think it'd be hard to argue that I have been marginalized, when I won Iowa, which was 94 percent white. We were almost tied in New Hampshire, a state that has an all-white population. And in Nevada, I was able to win, actually, the biggest votes, uh, margins, in those northern areas & that are predominantly white, rural, conservative areas," Obama said.

Mudslinging

At a South Carolina debate on Monday night hosted by the Congressional Black Caucus, the candidates' arguing left many complaining about an increase in "nastiness." Pundits argue that this type of negative perception could tarnish Obama's emphasis on "hope," but he says he's been the target not the source.

"There's been a flare up over the last month, namely because I've started doing well," he said with a laugh. "I mean, when I was 20 points down, I was a wonderful guy and my health care plan was universal. And, you know, as we got more notice and won Iowa, I think, you know, the classic Washington response was, 'Let's see if we can muddy the guy up a little bit,'" Obama said.

Personal Life

Unlike Sen. Clinton and Sen. Edwards, this is the first national campaign for Sen. Obama and his family. His wife, Michelle Obama, said earlier this week that "this is hard. There is another option for us that is better than this," referring to the sacrifice of spending time with their children and potentially making more money by not working in politics.

"Missing out on a chunk of your child's growing up is very difficult. But, you know, the reason she emphasizes this is because, you know, it's worth it," Obama said.

"You have to do this because you're passionate about making sure that the ordinary American out there who's trying to raise a family, the single mom who is struggling, that those people are getting some relief & We've done it in the past, there's no reason we can't do it in the future, but we need some leadership in Washington," he said.
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Old 01-27-2008, 09:15 AM   #921
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I'm not happy with the reult of the primary.
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Old 01-28-2008, 09:03 AM   #922
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USA Today

Jesus wants your vote — and he needs a running mate
By Matthew Streib, Religion News Service

WASHINGTON — He walked on water, he turned water to wine, and now he wants to be your candidate for president.

That's right, it's Jesus who should be the next leader of the free world, according to a website launched this month called www.JesusIn2008.com.

It invites voters to shape his platform, even nominate a contemporary running mate in this electronic nominating convention, then use the results to guide their real votes in November.

The Jesus running in 2008 is not divine but rather "Jesus the man, the revolutionary individual who comes to us through history as a model for ethical and moral human behavior," says the site's creator, Stephen Heffner.

"I'm probably not alone in feeling that somehow we are not getting the best possible candidates for president or the best possible process," says Heffner, a former newspaper reporter and a non-practicing Catholic.

"My sense is that if Jesus were here, he would do the right thing, without needing a political strategist giving him what he thinks people want to hear."

Heffner wants the debate to be intellectual and pragmatic, tempered with examples from the Bible, not a back-and-forth of sweeping dogma.

There are only three rules on the site: no miracles, no preaching and no rude behavior.

After all, if Jesus were to use miracles to solve the energy crisis or fund Social Security, strategic debate would be pointless.

So far, Mike Huckabee and California Attorney General Jerry Brown have been floated as possible VPs.

And delegates parse Jesus' positions on issues such as health care (he doesn't trust HMOs), the environment (he would be pro-conservation) and church-state separation ("Does Jesus have to recuse himself on this one?" one person asked).

The Rev. Jim Wallis, the progressive evangelical founder of Sojourners/Call to Renewal and author of the new book The Great Awakening: Reviving Faith & Politics in a Post-Religious Right America, says finding a candidate in Jesus' image isn't a political panacea.

"The Sermon on the Mount would not be a political platform. Changes in society are like reforms; you make one, and then you make another," Wallis says.

Jacques Berlinerblau, who teaches at Georgetown University and is author of Thumpin' It: The Use and Abuse of the Bible in Today's Presidential Politics, says the site "will let the secularists and non-believers get their ya-yas out because it'll be funny to see evangelicals and fundamentalists fume."

But, he says, if people seriously discuss "what Jesus would want as a candidate, it could make people think harder about the choices they make in the political process."

Would he vote for Jesus?

"Perhaps," Berlinerblau says. "The Jesus that I've constructed in my mind, the Jesus that I like, but that's my Jesus.

"When you ask people, 'Would you want Jesus to be your president?' people would almost always answer yes, but different people have different Jesuses. It's when Jesus enters the public sphere that people start to argue."
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:15 PM   #923
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Janet Reno endorses Clinton

Former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, who served in Bill Clinton's administration, is backing his wife in Tuesday's presidential primary.

Reno, who ran for governor in 2002 and served as Miami-Dade State Attorney, is one of Florida's best-known politicians. "She's got a large statewide following in Florida,'' said Ana Cruz, who leads a volunteer group called Hillary for Florida.

A Miami Herald poll last week showed that women voters favor Clinton over chief rival Barack Obama, 45 to 21 percent. But Florida's highest ranking female Democrat, Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink, has stayed neutral in the race.

"We haven't stopped pursing her endorsement,'' Cruz said.
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:18 PM   #924
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Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
Janet Reno endorses Clinton

that endorsement will seal her fate.

dbs
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:38 PM   #925
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What's your problem with her, is she a shrew too?
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:49 PM   #926
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wait and see
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:56 PM   #927
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No witch pictures of Ms Reno? Google not working?
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:59 PM   #928
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PENSACOLA, Florida (CNN) – Mitt Romney's failure to eat fried chicken with the skin on is nothing short of blasphemy here in the South, according to GOP rival Mike Huckabee.

Romney, of Massachusetts, dug into a piece fried chicken at KFC while campaigning in Lutz, Florida on Saturday, but not before peeling off what most would consider the best part — the crispy skin.

Admittedly, KFC's chicken doesn't exactly stack up against the delectable kind that comes out of deep fryers in kitchens around the South, and Romney said he was looking for the healthiest option available to him for lunch.

Huckabee, looking ahead to a flotilla of southern states up for grabs on Super Tuesday, was told about the move by a reporter here in the Florida panhandle.

"I can tell you this," he said, "any Southerner knows if you don’t eat the skin don’t bother calling it fried chicken."

"So that's good. I'm glad that he did that, because that means I'm going to win Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma … all these great Southern states that understand the best part of fried chicken is the skin, if you're going to eat it that way."

Huckabee admitted that he hasn't eaten fried chicken in a while because of his weight loss program, preferring it broiled or baked instead.

And speaking of possible gaffes, a good Southerner might also dispute one of Huckabee's claims: since when is Oklahoma "a great southern state"?
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Old 01-28-2008, 04:21 PM   #929
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I really hope the Clinton campaign changes its' mind on pulling this stuff, it is on the verge of doing her in for good. How can they not see that?

Lost is on Thursday night, I will debate watch during the commercials. Maybe Hillary could send Bill to the Lost island until the election is over.


January 28, 2008
Op-Ed Columnist
Desperate Husband
By WILLIAM KRISTOL, NY Times

In the run-up to Saturday’s South Carolina primary, Bill Clinton repeatedly denounced racial divisions in American politics. Indeed, he said Friday in Spartanburg, Americans are “literally aching to live in a post-racial future.”

But Clinton certainly hasn’t been hastening that day. Quite the contrary. In Charleston, on Wednesday, he disingenuously remarked: “As far as I can tell, neither Senator Obama nor Hillary have lost votes because of their race or gender. They are getting votes, to be sure, because of their race or gender — that’s why people tell me Hillary doesn’t have a chance of winning here.”

Really? Who was telling him that?

Hillary was ahead in South Carolina polls as recently as early December. And in fact, women made up 61 percent of the Democratic electorate in South Carolina, blacks 55 percent. If Obama was getting votes because of race and Hillary because of gender, Hillary had a perfectly good chance to win. Bill Clinton’s excuse is unconvincing and unseemly.

Then on Saturday, in Columbia, pre-spinning his wife’s imminent defeat, Clinton reminded reporters out of the blue that “Jesse Jackson won South Carolina twice, in ’84 and ’88. And he ran a good campaign. And Senator Obama’s run a good campaign here. He’s run a good campaign everywhere.”

What do Jesse Jackson’s victories two decades ago have to do with this year’s Obama-Clinton race? The Obama campaign is nothing like Jackson’s. Obama isn’t running on Jackson-like themes. Obama rarely refers to Jackson.

Clinton’s comment alludes to one thing, and to one thing only: Jackson and Obama are both black candidates. The silent premise of Clinton’s comment is that Obama’s victory in South Carolina doesn’t really count. Or, at least, Clinton is suggesting, it doesn’t mean any more than Jackson’s did.

But of course — as Clinton knows very well — Jesse Jackson didn’t win (almost all-white) Iowa. He didn’t come within a couple of points of prevailing in (almost all-white) New Hampshire. Nor did he, as Obama did, carry white voters in rural Nevada. And Saturday, in South Carolina, even after Bill Clinton tried to turn Obama into Jackson, Hillary defeated Obama by just three to two among white voters

So Bill Clinton has been playing the race card, and doing so clumsily. But why is he playing any cards? He wasn’t supposed to be in the game. But just as Hillary was supposed to be finding her own voice, Bill decided to barge in, and to do so with a vengeance. This has been no favor to Hillary.

The proof is in the South Carolina results. Bill Clinton became the dominant story in the last few days of that campaign. According to the exit polls, about one in five South Carolina Democrats decided whom to vote for in the last three days. Among those late deciders, Hillary Clinton received only 21 percent of the vote compared with 27 percent overall. In South Carolina, many of those falling off from Clinton seemed to go to Edwards. Next week, with Edwards much less of a factor, won’t many such voters go all the way to Obama?

Right now, Hillary Clinton is ahead in the polls in almost all the big states voting. She is a tough and capable campaigner, and she may be able to hold on to those leads. But it is now clear that putting her in the White House brings a hyperactive Bill back in with her. Who needs it? Liberals and Democrats can get basically the same policies without the Clinton baggage, and in choosing Obama, they can nominate a more electable candidate.

So Hillary’s advantage in the polls will, I suspect, erode. The erosion could be hastened by the expected endorsement of Obama by Ted Kennedy on Monday. It could be helped further along if Al Gore hops aboard the Obama bandwagon later in the week. Meanwhile, Tom Daschle, the Senate Democratic leader during most of the Clinton presidency, is actively supporting Obama. Talk to Democrats in D.C., and it’s amazing how many who know the Clintons well — many of whom worked in the Clinton administration — are eager that they not return to the White House.

This week, the Clinton team will dump every bit of opposition research it has on Obama. We’ll see how Obama responds.

But the moment of truth could come at the Democratic debate Thursday, in Los Angeles. Edwards may have dropped out by then. If so, it will be a one-on-one showdown. Even if he’s there, he’ll be effectively a bystander. Will Obama hold his own?

I’d say that even if you’ve (understandably) skipped the previous debates, this is one to tune into. I had a dinner scheduled Thursday night. I’m canceling it. The Giants probably won’t beat the Patriots in the Super Bowl. But this could be the week Obama upsets the Clintons.
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Old 01-28-2008, 06:55 PM   #930
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Breaking News: Rudy Giuliani hints at dropping out




The least qualified candidate to be treated as a contender!


Quote:
Breaking News: Rudy Giuliani hints at dropping out

Rudy Giuliani appears to be pondering an end to his long pursuit of the Republican presidential nomination.

In a meeting in the back of his chartered plane en route to St. Petersburg, Fla., a short while ago, the onetime, longtime GOP front-runner told a small group of reporters, including The Times' Louise Roug: "The winner of Florida will win the nomination."

He then went on to predict he would win. And his spokeswoman, Maria Comella, said later he was speaking with confidence.

But that's an unusually categorical statement suggesting that only a total first-place upset by Giuliani, who trails both Mitt Romney and John McCain in all major polls for Florida's Republican primary tomorrow, will keep him in the competition, despite previous repeated vows to continue.

Giuliani's campaign, which led in national polls when it began and stayed there for many months, is showing signs of serious financial fatigue. This month his top staffers are foregoing their paychecks so the maximum amount of money can be invested to salvage his political fortunes in the Sunshine State, which was where Giuliani's late-state strategy was to kick into high gear.
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