Trained Guide Dog Banned From Second Grader's School - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

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Old 08-16-2006, 03:46 PM   #16
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What would happen if a student needed a guide dog at school, but other students were severely allergic to dogs?

Schools can apparently ban peanut butter, can they also ban guide dogs?

With all the talk of severe allergies in children these days, I'm sure this situation has come up one time or another.
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Old 08-16-2006, 04:08 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by corianderstem
What would happen if a student needed a guide dog at school, but other students were severely allergic to dogs?

Schools can apparently ban peanut butter, can they also ban guide dogs?

With all the talk of severe allergies in children these days, I'm sure this situation has come up one time or another.
I was wondering the same thing. The conclusion I came to in my mind is that a dog allergy doesn't mean instant death like a peanut allergy can, so it would be easier to handle the situation on an individual basis. If a kid has a dog allergy, s/he or the disabled kid can be moved to a different class to avoid the dog. However some kids with peanut allergies can't be anywhere near peanut oil. You can also get dogs that have little to no allergens (labradoodles for one), but that would depend on the availability of one as a service dog.
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Old 08-16-2006, 05:00 PM   #18
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That's a good point. I hadn't considered the possibility that dog allergies would/might not be as severe or life-threatening as something like a peanut allergy.
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Old 08-16-2006, 05:16 PM   #19
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I agree with the fourth poster. Apparently the kid needs the dog, but if it's not well trained that's a problem and this needs to be worked out. I hate it when people think disabled people are "entitlement" people.
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Old 08-16-2006, 05:27 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by LivLuvAndBootlegMusic


I was wondering the same thing. The conclusion I came to in my mind is that a dog allergy doesn't mean instant death like a peanut allergy can, so it would be easier to handle the situation on an individual basis. If a kid has a dog allergy, s/he or the disabled kid can be moved to a different class to avoid the dog. However some kids with peanut allergies can't be anywhere near peanut oil. You can also get dogs that have little to no allergens (labradoodles for one), but that would depend on the availability of one as a service dog.
Very good point..The kid can also take allergie medicine..Think of it this way, what is more important...I disabled girl who needs a guide dog and a kid who has allergies.. Wouldn't it be a little harder to take away the guard dog then just to give the kid some medicine for their allergies? also just put the kid in another class so she doesnt have to put the kid in the same class as the kid with allergies..Has the dog ever lunged or try to bite someone? No.. So why can't they just muzzle the dog when they're at school..The dog doesnt have to go to obedient school because it barks...Muzzling the dog is just fast and easy as long as the dog never tried to hurt someone..
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Old 08-16-2006, 07:31 PM   #21
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Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
some comments on the paper's online message board

"Send the brat and her pooch someplace else. There's no reason why such a clearly aggressive and dangerous dog should be in the presence of schoolchildren. If I were a parent and if that dumb dog bit or lunged after my kids, I would have been furious and filed a lawsuit so fast it would make that girl's head spin. Let's be real: dogs don't belong in school. They pose immediate health and safety risks for young children. If the kid's bones break easily, then she should go to a special school or be educated at home."

"I am appalled at this display of pure meaness. Hasn't this girl suffered enough?? This animal makes the world a safer place for her, what are the chances he' s going to hurt someone else. This dog is trained to deal with sick children. These officials are just looking for an easy way out. Replacing the dog with a human aid takes security and safety away from a brave little girl who is only trying to fit in with the children around her."

"We live in a culture of entitlement. "I have a right to do this; I have a right to do that." You do not have a right to bring animals to school! Hello, common sense! This shouldn't even be up for discussion, here."

"It's a tough call. I think that having the guide dog present in school would help not only Hailey, but the other children to understand her condition better as well. I also can't imagine that a professionally trained guide dog would exhibit aggressive behavior. The school's defense lawyer was quoted as saying, ``The dog was poorly trained and aggressive," but I don't think she should be the final word. Why not bring in a qualified, outside party to determine whether or not the dog should be around children and teachers. "

The first comment pisses me off. People can be such assholes.
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Old 08-16-2006, 07:36 PM   #22
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My brother has (I think it's called Cynophobia) a phobia of dogs. Even the calmest, laziest dogs prevent him from being able to go places. We've cancelled get-togethers because of him.

Her problem is that other KIDS won't work with her. If they assign a special aid, this girl can become close to that person.
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Old 08-16-2006, 08:22 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by tpsglick2424


Very good point..The kid can also take allergie medicine..Think of it this way, what is more important...I disabled girl who needs a guide dog and a kid who has allergies.. Wouldn't it be a little harder to take away the guard dog then just to give the kid some medicine for their allergies? also just put the kid in another class so she doesnt have to put the kid in the same class as the kid with allergies..Has the dog ever lunged or try to bite someone? No.. So why can't they just muzzle the dog when they're at school..The dog doesnt have to go to obedient school because it barks...Muzzling the dog is just fast and easy as long as the dog never tried to hurt someone..
This is an extrememly simplistic "solution" to a quite complex problem. The dog has demonstrated aggressive behavior. Not all children can simply take "allergie" medicine.
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Old 08-16-2006, 08:35 PM   #24
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The allergies thing is a completely different matter, but I'm not so sure you can essentially forcibly make somebody medicate themselves with drugs that will alter their immune response when removal of the animal would easily solve their problem. I'm not sure how many of you here would subject yourselves to constant and repeated doses of anti-histamines in that situation.
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Old 08-16-2006, 11:26 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally posted by tpsglick2424

So why can't they just muzzle the dog when they're at school..The dog doesnt have to go to obedient school because it barks...Muzzling the dog is just fast and easy as long as the dog never tried to hurt someone..
Because it's a service dog and you don't muzzle service dogs. They need to be able to pick up dropped objects, carry bags, answer phones, etc. An aggressive dog needs obedience training. Muzzling is not any kind of smart solution. It's OK if you're working with the dog to overcome aggression (like you start taking the dog on walks to meet other dogs and have him muzzled the first few times), but it's not a longterm solution and is not fair to the animal or the child the animal is supposed to be helping.
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Old 08-17-2006, 12:11 AM   #26
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I'm a teacher and my wife is a school administrator. We are also both big dog lovers.

In this case, I would probably have to side with the school. I certainly wouldn't want to cause any harm or distress to the little girl and I would do all in my power to accomodate her and her dog, but at the end of the day, I understand the decison they made. It's not like they made the decision based on nothing. The dog behaved aggressively, and that was serious cause for concern. Liability. It's a fact of life in America, sad to say, and a lot of times you end up being overly cautious.

However, the comments that Mrs. S quoted are inexcusable and totally lacking in compassion. I was revolted by them.
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Old 08-17-2006, 03:02 AM   #27
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Scituate school officials have barred Indy, saying that on the few occasions Indy has visited Jenkins Elementary School, the 2-year-old dog has growled and barked at students and teachers.
"


Manduca said school officials told her that neither Indy nor any other service dog would be allowed at the school.

That seems odd to me. I can see why one may not be allowed but why absolutley none? I don't feel the child 's best interests are nessacarily being looked after and there something else behind all this.
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Old 08-18-2006, 04:22 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally posted by starsgoblue

Manduca said school officials told her that neither Indy nor any other service dog would be allowed at the school.


That'a what the mom said the school said, not what the school said.
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