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Old 03-19-2007, 05:22 PM   #1
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Torture Is The New Sex

So will the FCC eventually be able to fine for violence? Even liberal Democrats are concerned. I don't watch 24 but I have read heard and read about the controversy surrounding the torture it depicts.

I am not in favor of censorship, I am in favor of responsible viewing and of parents monitoring what kids watch. I would hope kids aren't watching 24 and more adult violent shows. But one thing I do believe is that it's a good thing to have people concerned about kids being exposed to violence as much as they're concerned about the sex. But adults can make their own decisions. I don't care for extreme violence so I don't watch it, but it also depends upon the context it exists in. But I want to decide for myself, not have the government decide for me. That doesn't mean the creative community has no responsibility for what they create-they do.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...599719,00.html

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But don't relax yet, River City: the guardians of decency are warning about new trouble, with a capital T, which rhymes with V, which stands for violence. The Parents Television Council (PTC), the group at the vanguard of the TV-sex wars, has lately focused on prime-time blood: power-tool torture on 24, serial killing on Criminal Minds, vivisection on Heroes. And the FCC has prepared a draft report suggesting that Congress authorize it to regulate broadcast violence, as it now does obscenity, and possibly force cable companies to let subscribers opt out of paying for channels that run brutal content.

In short, torture is the new sex. Jack Bauer is the new Janet Jackson.
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Old 03-19-2007, 05:44 PM   #2
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My mom has only seen 1 or 2 episodes of 24 and all she can do is talk about how violent it was (she hates violence). Personally I haven't seen an episode, but I have heard a lot from people complaining about the torture scenes in it.

Whether or not that warrents censorship I don't know, for as I said I haven't seen it myself.
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Old 03-19-2007, 08:18 PM   #3
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i've always been more bothered by violence than sex.

i'd much rather have sex than engage in violence.

but, hey, that's just me.

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Old 03-20-2007, 03:50 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally posted by U2democrat
My mom has only seen 1 or 2 episodes of 24 and all she can do is talk about how violent it was (she hates violence). Personally I haven't seen an episode, but I have heard a lot from people complaining about the torture scenes in it.

Whether or not that warrents censorship I don't know, for as I said I haven't seen it myself.
The correct answer is that it doesn't warrant censorship in principle, even if you haven't seen it.
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Old 03-20-2007, 08:39 AM   #5
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Re: Torture Is The New Sex

Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
But adults can make their own decisions. I don't care for extreme violence so I don't watch it, but it also depends upon the context it exists in. But I want to decide for myself, not have the government decide for me.

True, that ^. Honestly, I didn't even know what the FCC was until Bono swore during the Oscars. I always was under the impression that if adults had a problem with something on TV or in a movie, they were cognizant enough to just watch something else.
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Old 03-20-2007, 08:54 AM   #6
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24 is genius television and top-notch literature and I'm a huge fan.

But I gotta say, the torture scenes, whilst not all that explicit, can be quite distressing to watch. One recent episode was particularly shocking, in which Morris O'Brian went through an ordeal in which a drill was driven into his live body.

Indeed, just because 24 does feature the use of torture quite regularly, it is still very anti-torture in some respects, whilst it also acknowledges the reality that such a means of getting one's way through the use of torture can be quite effective.

Mind you, I know no one who derives a "pornographic-like" pleasure from viewing torture scenes, and I find it a little difficult to comprehend such behaviour.

Censorship agencies should indeed be cracking down on torture more so than sexual content.
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Old 03-20-2007, 01:59 PM   #7
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Violence bothers me more than sex does. I object to torture much more than I do sex.
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Old 03-20-2007, 03:50 PM   #8
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That reminds me of "The People vs Larry Flint" with Woody Harrelson where he's arguing that sex isn't obscene... violence is.
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Old 04-26-2007, 01:36 PM   #9
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NY Times

April 26, 2007
F.C.C. Moves to Restrict TV Violence
By STEPHEN LABATON

WASHINGTON, April 25 — Concerned about an increase in violence on television, the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday urged lawmakers to consider regulations that would restrict violent programs to late evening, when most children would not be watching.

The commission, in a long-awaited report, concluded that the program ratings system and technology intended to help parents block offensive programs — like the V-chip — had failed to protect children from being regularly exposed to violence.

As a result, the commission recommended that Congress move to limit violence on entertainment programs by giving the agency the authority to define such content and restrict it to late evening television.

It also suggested that Congress adopt legislation that would give consumers the option to buy cable channels “à la carte” — individually or in smaller bundles — so that they would be able to reject channels they did not want.

“Clearly, steps should be taken to protect children from excessively violent programming,” said Kevin J. Martin, the agency’s chairman and a longtime proponent of à la carte programming. “Some might say such action is long overdue. Parents need more tools to protect children from excessively violent programming.”

The commission report, which was requested by Congress three years ago, was sharply criticized by civil liberties advocates and by the cable television industry for proposing steps that both said would be too intrusive.

“These F.C.C. recommendations are political pandering,” said Caroline Fredrickson, director of the Washington legislative office of the American Civil Liberties Union. “The government should not replace parents as decision makers in America’s living rooms. There are some things that the government does well. But deciding what is aired and when on television is not one of them.”

She added: “Government should not parent the parents.”

A spokesman at the National Cable and Telecommunications Association, Brian Dietz, said consumers “are the best judge of which content is appropriate for their household.”

“Simple-sounding solutions, such as à la carte regulation of cable TV packages, are misguided and would endanger cable’s high-quality family-friendly programming, leaving parents and children with fewer viewing options,” he said.

Executives at the major networks said that they wanted to study the report, which was released Wednesday evening, before commenting.

A spokesman for the National Association of Broadcasters, Dennis Wharton, said that broadcast television was “far more tame than programming found on pay TV in terms of both sex and violence.”

Noting that the association, along with all the networks and major cable groups, is in the middle of a $300 million marketing effort to help educate parents about the V-chip and other technology to block programs, Mr. Wharton said, “Should this not be given a chance to work?”

The report and accompanying recommendations set the stage for a political battle between the commission and three powerful interest groups — the broadcasters, the cable TV industry and satellite television.

It comes on the heels of efforts by the agency to penalize radio and television stations for violating the indecency rule. Those penalties have been challenged in courts on the grounds that they violate the First Amendment.

The outcome of the cases, which could wind up in the United States Supreme Court, could determine whether the government would have the authority to impose limits on violent programs.

The report said that research on whether violent programming had caused children to act more aggressively was inconclusive. But it also cited studies, including one by the surgeon general, that say exposure to violent content has been associated with increased aggression or violent behavior in children, at least in the short term.

It said that the V-chip and other blocking technology had failed because, according to recent studies, nearly 9 out of 10 parents do not use them And the ratings system was of limited use, the study found, because less than half of parents surveyed had used it.

In addition, many also believed the ratings were inaccurate. Mr. Martin and other supporters of à la carte programming say that it would be easier to put in place than content-based regulations because it would not face the same First Amendment challenges.

“There is no First Amendment right to get paid for your channels,” Mr. Martin said. “All of the versions of à la carte would keep government out of regulating content directly while enabling consumers, including parents, to receive the programming they want and believe to be appropriate for their families.”

The groups supporting such an approach range from Consumers Union to the Parents Television Council, an organization that has lobbied for more stringent penalties for obscene and violent programs.

But such a proposal faces formidable obstacles in Congress because of the influence of the industries involved. The cable industry has fought hard against new regulations and has said that attempts to force à la carte programs would prompt the closing of many educational and local stations.

The broadcasters say that it would be difficult to formulate a definition of “violence” and that tougher regulations could wind up censoring otherwise legitimate programs.

But Mr. Martin rejected that argument, noting that the industry has already formulated ratings to describe the level of violence in programs, and therefore government-imposed limits on when programs could run would be constitutional.

A leading sponsor of efforts to force cable companies to offer à la carte services has been Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona. But he is spending less time in Congress these days as he begins his campaign for president.
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Old 04-26-2007, 02:57 PM   #10
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24 is harmless.
Watching a good guy triumph over a bad guy with violence doesn't make that good person watch want to go out and slew 'bad ppl'.

When I watch James Bond or Jack Bauer it doesn't make me wanna harm anybody.

On the other hand watching promiscious television shows is a little more subtle in it's approach.

Shows like Desperate Housewives and Sex in the City plant a seed in ppl's mind and are complete rubbish, and I won't watch them.

Equating violent shows to skin shows as psychologically damaging equivilents is a stretch.

This thread is complete drivel.

dbs
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by diamond


But equating violent shows to skin shows in as psychological damaging equivilents is a strectch.

This thread is complete drivel.

That's not what "torture is the new sex" means.

And there's no need to be rude Dave, considering some of the threads you've started here and rated them 5 stars.
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:11 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by diamond
24 is harmless.
Watching a good guy triumph over a bad guy with violence doesn't make that good person watch want to go out and slew 'bad ppl'.

When I watch James Bond or Jack Bauer it doesn't make me wanna harm anybody.

On the other hand watching promiscious television shows is a little more subtle in it's approach.

Shows like Desperate Housewives and Sex in the City plant a seed in ppl's mind and are complete rubbish, and I won't watch them.

Equating violent shows to skin shows as psychologically damaging equivilents is a stretch.

This thread is complete drivel.

dbs
You say one is drivel and one isn't simply because you like one and not the other, not because of any proof.

I got a laugh out of your fear of sex though.
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:11 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by diamond

Shows like Desperate Housewives and Sex in the City plant a seed in ppl's mind and are complete rubbish, and I won't watch them.

Such an ignorant, uniformed, opiniated and over-broad statement. It's your loss.
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:18 PM   #14
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mindless, senseless, libreral drivel
crap.
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:39 PM   #15
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Quote:
mindless, senseless drivel
crap.
That pretty much sums up your post.
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