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Old 06-16-2006, 07:24 AM   #1
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THIRTY YEARS AGO TODAY....in SOUTH AFRICA

Today, 16 June 2006, marks a VERY IMPORTANT DATE in the history of South Africa and a equally important date in my personal life.


This event which happened thirty years ago in South Africa changed my life for the rest of my life.


And in honor of all those who gave their lives for the Freedom of South Africa and of the TREMENDOUSLY POSITIVE INFLUENCE THAT THEY HAD ON MY LIFE, I give you this article:


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/5085450.stm



S Africa marking Soweto uprising


South Africa is marking 30 years since the Soweto uprising, a student protest pivotal to the apartheid struggle.


President Thabo Mbeki led a march along the route taken on 16 June 1976 by black students fighting a law forcing them to learn in Afrikaans.


Relatives of the children killed when police opened fire cried as wreaths were laid in their memory.


Some 20,000 people have gathered at the FNB stadium where a 21-gun salute welcomed Mr Mbeki ahead of his speech.


"On 16 June that day in 1976, I was on this same road. There was teargas. People screaming, running, and police chasing everybody," said Martin Mhanlanga who brought his niece on the march, AP news agency reports.


In the unrest that followed, hundreds of people died in clashes as an outpouring of black anger spread.


The Soweto uprising and the riots that spread to other township are seen as a milestone in the growth of the movement against white minority rule, which was finally ended in 1994.

'Puff of smoke'

The commemorations have centred on the Hector Peterson memorial, named after the first and youngest student to die.


He was caught on camera as he died in the arms of a fellow student, in a photograph that became iconic in the struggle against white minority rule in South Africa.


His mother Dorothy Molefi and President Mbeki were among those to lay wreaths at the memorial, watched by hundreds of people who observed a minute's silence.

Some relatives welled up with emotion as the crowd sang a Zulu struggle song "Senzeni na", meaning "We are Crying", AP reports.



"I remember it like it was yesterday. That day was a sad, sad day and today for me is a day of joy," 56-year-old Maria Dikeledi told AFP news agency.


But Archbishop Desmond Tutu told the BBC's World Today programme that South Africa had a mixed record since the end of apartheid.

He said the country's impressive stability was threatened by "dehumanising poverty".


"Unless we do something about that quickly, we may find all our achievements are a puff of smoke," he said.


Milestone

In Soweto, red paving stones symbolising spilled blood have been laid along the route the protesters took.

The coloured slabs start at Morris Isaacson High School, where many of the protesting students began their march, and end at Orlando West School where the fateful confrontation with police took place.




The government said that 95 black people had been killed, but unofficial estimates put the number of dead closer to 500.

At the time, Winnie Mandela, the wife of then-imprisoned ANC leader Nelson Mandela, described the protests as "just the beginning".



Domestic and international pressure eventually lead to the release of Mr Mandela in 1990 and the country's first non-racial elections four years later.

Mr Mandela was overwhelmingly elected to become South Africa's first black president.

------------------------------------------------------

I hope that you will all take some time today to learn more about the heroic student uprising that started in Soweto thirty years ago today in South Africa and rededicate yourselves to making a POSITIVE CHANGE in our world.


VIVA Hector Peterson and all those who suffered or died in the struggle for freedom in South Africa!


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Old 06-16-2006, 06:35 PM   #2
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Thank you for posting this article........I am glad to see the positive side...the past few days I have been getting much negative feedback from people I've encountered in my daily life and have been depressed just thinking about it.

But it is good to reflect back sometimes and see that change can occur......

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Old 06-16-2006, 09:37 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally posted by wizard2c
Thank you for posting this article........I am glad to see the positive side...the past few days I have been getting much negative feedback from people I've encountered in my daily life and have been depressed just thinking about it.

But it is good to reflect back sometimes and see that change can occur......

Very well said, wizard2c.

It was watching the students of Soweto, some of them less than ten years of age, stand up heroically for the right to go to school and learn in their own languages rather than in the apartheid Afrikaans language that stirred something VERY DEEP in my spirit back in 1976.


As a 16 year person, I was inspired by these students half a world away and made a commitment in my Heart and Soul then to do whatever I could to make a positive difference in the world.


I have never given up that vision or that aspiration.


And I have the students of Soweto who began their heroic stand against apartheid thirty years ago today to thank for my own deep sense of activism - especially for Africa.


A Luta Continua (The Struggle Continues)
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Old 06-16-2006, 09:43 PM   #4
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Here is a very inspirational article about the mothers of some of the children who led the Soweto uprising of 1976:



Soweto mothers march to remember
By Justin Pearce
BBC News, Soweto



"Hector would be 42 now - he died for the nation, and today he is part of history."

Dorothy Molefi lost her son 30 years ago. He was Hector Peterson, shot by a police bullet on 16 June 1976, becoming the first victim of the student uprising against apartheid.


On Friday morning, Mrs Molefi joined President Thabo Mbeki and other officials in laying wreaths at the monument in Orlando West, Soweto, to her son and others who died in the uprising.

"I'm so glad about what's happening today, 30 years later," she told the BBC News website.

She reflected on the changes that have come about since the start of democracy in South Africa: "Single mothers are given houses - our children are mixed with whites in the schools."


'Celebrate'

For the younger people who gathered around the monument, part of the excitement of the moment was having a public holiday - Youth Day, as 16 June now is - all of their own.

Nonkululeku Mnikati, 23, said she was there "to celebrate freedom - to celebrate being recognised as the youth of South Africa."


(I never got to the end of the march the first time around - This time I want to finish. - Soweto marcher)


On the generation of 1976 she said: "We look up to them, what they did was great. But sometimes it's like looking at a movie, it's hard to believe what happened was real.
"So it's good to see Hector Peterson's mother here, because that helps us to know it was real."


The day's events had begun in a frosty dawn several kilometres away, outside the Morris Isaacson High School, from where the first group of teenage demonstrators had set out 30 years ago, led by a student called Tsietsi Mashinini.

After the march, Tsietsi went into hiding and later died in mysterious circumstances in Guinea.

His mother, Nomkitha, was there in a wheelchair to help unveil a monument in the middle of a newly created memorial park opposite the school.

"We thought it would just be a few months of struggle - unfortunately it didn't work out like that," she reflected.



Peanuts

At the monument, another veteran of '76 who had joined the ANC's liberation army explained its significance to a group of younger people.

"I wanted to be a doctor, but I ended up carrying an AK-47 and now I work for the police. The struggle changed me."


Gilo Maguma, 40, was also involved in the protests, and is now unemployed.
"We are not liberated yet - we are still confined to 13% of the country," he said in reference to the fact that white people still own most of South Africa's land.

"Black people earn peanuts.


"16 June was important because it opened many doors - we do feel liberated spiritually but physically we are not liberated yet."



Led by President Mbeki, a few hundred marchers set off on the five-kilometre route to the Hector Peterson memorial: the same route taken by the students 30 year ago.

"I never got to the end of the march the first time around," one marcher said.

"This time I want to finish."



Inspiration

Amid the scheduled events there were moments of spontaneity too.

After the wreath-laying ceremony, a young guy with dreadlocks and an ANC golf shirt picked up a child in his arms walked at the head of the march, re-enacting the famous photograph of Hector Peterson that has become an icon of South African history.


As he got tired he passed the boy from one marcher to another as they toyi-toyied - the dance that accompanies every South African protest march - and sang militant songs dating back to the fight against apartheid.


Leaving Hector Peterson Square scattered with the blue plastic water bottles, the last of the marchers got onto buses bound for the FNB Stadium.

There, those people who hadn't been so keen on a pre-dawn start on this public holiday were already arriving: at least 20,000 of them.

The mood was in tune with a place that's more used to football matches than to rallies of this kind.

As President Thabo Mbeki stepped out of a large black Mercedes and onto the green of the pitch, people started cheering and blowing vuvuzelas (plastic trumpets).

They cheered and whistled as a Rooivalk helicopter - the South African Air Force's meanest machine - treated the crowd to a display of aerial gymnastics.


President Mbeki urged the crowd to "remember all the brave young people who started the uprising in Soweto on 16 June 1976 and who are not with us today".

He touched on the problems that still face South African youth: hunger, run-down school buildings, the abuse of women and children, unemployment.



"May the courage and vision displayed by our youth 30 years ago serve to inspire and motivate us all as we strive to bring happiness to our youth and our people."


Many of the youngsters appeared to lose interest as Mr Mbeki's speech continued, and started drifting towards the gates.

But others, like Sibusiso Mthembu, 15, were no less earnest than the president: "Youth should support this and appreciate what people have done for them - and stop sleeping around and doing drugs."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/5087694.stm
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Old 06-18-2006, 09:16 PM   #5
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I never could forget these students because it was their bravery in the face of complete brutality and oppression which motivated me to start down my own road of social activism.


It was watching the students of Soweto, some of them less than ten years of age, stand up heroically for the right to go to school and learn in their own languages rather than in the apartheid Afrikaans language that stirred something VERY DEEP in my spirit back in 1976.


As a 16 year person, I was inspired by these students half a world away and made a commitment in my Heart and Soul then to do whatever I could to make a positive difference in the world.


I have never given up that vision or that aspiration.


And I have the students of Soweto who began their heroic stand against apartheid thirty years ago today to thank for my own deep sense of activism - especially for Africa.


We should definitely NEVER FORGET the heroic student uprising of Soweto.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here is an EXCELLENT article regarding the reasons why the student uprising of Soweto happened and how that affected the future course of South African history:


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/5038312.stm




Why the Soweto protests erupted
By Martin Plaut
BBC News


The 30th anniversary of the Soweto uprising in South Africa is on 16 June: the day school pupils took to the streets of a township on the outskirts of Johannesburg, to protest against the standards of their education.

The government had brought in a new regulation insisting that they be taught in Afrikaans - a language few of their teachers spoke.
It was also the language of government, a government that had instituted the hated system of racial segregation known as apartheid.

The issue ignited the protests that soon went way beyond their education, and triggered resistance that finally led to the end of white rule.




What led to apartheid?

In looking for the origins of apartheid we have to peer back more than 100 years, to the Boer War of 1899.


Britain, determined to take control of the rich gold and diamond mines which lay around Kimberley and Johannesburg, sent nearly half a million troops in to crush the Boers, as the white Afrikaans-speaking settlers were then known.
After three years of bloody conflict, the Boers were left broken and destitute.

But in the peace talks that followed they were able to extract certain guarantees from their British rulers.

First, the idea of a vote for South Africa's black majority was rejected, despite strenuous protests from the newly formed African National Congress.

Then, after independence was achieved in 1910, a series of laws were passed ensuring that most of the land, as well as the best jobs, remained in white hands.

Despite this, most Afrikaners (as the Boers became known) remained poor, with the real wealth held by English speaking white South Africans, who dominated mining and industry. The Afrikaners pressed for further racial legislation.




Introducing apartheid

In 1948, an Afrikaner-led South African government was elected, promising a new beginning for the country. This was the policy of apartheid.

Immediately, a series of laws was passed forbidding marriage and sex between the races.

Further legislation introduced racial segregation on buses, in the schools and hospitals, on the beaches people played on.

At the heart of the system was the pass laws.

Without the correct documents, Africans were forbidden to live or work in towns - leaving them to exist in impoverished rural areas until the mines or factories needed them.

The black population was furious, but repeated protests were ignored.

In 1960 protests erupted into violence, as the police opened fire on a crowd at Sharpeville, 50km south of Johannesburg, who had come to burn their pass books.



The African National Congress and other organisations were banned.

During the 1960s and early 1970s whites ruled almost unchallenged.

In June 1976, black anger finally boiled over. It was the pass laws, and the whole system of apartheid, that formed the backdrop to the protests that became known as the Soweto uprising.




The Soweto uprising

Dawn broke over the township of Soweto like any other winter's day. But 16 June 1976, was to be a day like no other.


School children had been awake for hours, planning a demonstration against enforced teaching in Afrikaans.

Over a dozen assembly points had been planned, where students gathered at 0700.

Singing freedom songs, they carried placards bearing slogans: "Down with Afrikaans" and "Blacks are not dustbins - Afrikaans stinks".

About 50 police arrived, and confronted the demonstrations. At first they used tear gas, but soon shots were fired.

Running clashes with the police erupted, with the children replying to the live rounds with stones.

"All of a sudden about six policemen armed with sten guns and rifles turned onto the crowd and most of them fired shots into the air," Nat Serache, a reporter with the Rand Daily Mail, recalled.

"But unfortunately one of them fired into the crowd and two kids were hit: One a five-year-old girl who was hit in the head and died on the spot, and a nine-year-old boy who was shot through the chest and also died on the spot."



Police and the military were brought into Soweto.

Army helicopters were seen over the township. The rioting spread. Buses were burnt and shops looted. Adults joined in the protests.

Prime Minister John Vorster warned on television that "the police have been instructed, regardless of who is involved, to protect lives and property with every means at their disposal".

"This government will not be intimidated and instructions have been given to maintain law and order at all costs," he said.

For three days the protests spread from one township to another before the authorities regained control.



The government claimed 95 black people had been killed, but unofficial estimates put the number of dead closer to 500.

In the words of Winnie Mandela, the wife of the imprisoned ANC leader Nelson Mandela: "The people are unarmed. They are faced with a heavily-armed government who will succeed in suppressing it now as is always the case. But it is just the beginning."

It was indeed only the beginning. It was to take nearly 20 years, but the flame that was lit in Soweto in June 1976 finally consumed the apartheid government and ended white rule in 1994.

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Old 06-18-2006, 09:58 PM   #6
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I don't want to rain on anyone's parade here but isn't this Mbeki guy responsible for South Africa's horribly disgraceful stand on AIDS???
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Old 06-19-2006, 09:06 PM   #7
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Here is an article about 13 year old Hector Peterson whose sacrifice launched the modern push to end apartheid in South Africa.


Those interested in understanding and learning more about Africa should take a lesson from the extreme dedication and unity of these students to achieve their ultimate goal.


When one is focused on the suffering of others, there is no room for negativity and divisiveness.


------------------------------------------------

Africa: Soweto Uprising Remembered
By Charlayne Hunter-Gault
CNN Johannesburg Bureau Chief



SOWETO, South Africa (CNN) -- It was a picture that got the world's attention: A frozen moment in time that showed 13-year-old Hector Peterson dying after being struck down by a policeman's bullet.

At his side was his 17-year-old sister.



"I saw that he was bad, but I thought that he was just wounded, you know,ä remembers Hectorâs sister Antoinette Sithole, ã· because I couldn't figure out where.

In recent years, June 16th has been called Youth Day, but for many years it was known simply as the day of the Soweto Uprisings - a chain of events that signaled the beginning of the end of apartheid.

Hector Peterson was among some 30,000 students who took to the streets of Soweto protesting a government edict that all classes were to be taught in Afrikaans - the language of the white minority.



A struggle without documentation is no struggle
"I came to this spot here," recalled Peter Magubane, a young photographer who lived in Soweto at the time. "I saw huge numbers of schoolchildren coming towards me. I got out of the car and started taking pictures. And I could see hands that (were gesturing) no pictures.

"I went over and said to them, 'Why do you say I can't take pictures?' They said, 'Because the police might be able to identify some of us.' And I said to them, 'a struggle without documentation is no struggle," Magubane said.



"Soweto was on fire," he said. "The children were angry. Ten-year-olds were in the streets picking up stones and throwing. Where there was anything burning, you would find these 10-year-olds, 9-year-olds, saying ÎPower, Power!â You realized that the political mood had changed."

By day's end, officially, there were 23 dead. Locals say it was more like 200. Hundreds were injured as the protest spread throughout the country, eventually ending the attempt to impose Afrikaans on black school children and opening a wider door to ending apartheid.


The shot made me angry," Sithole said. "But you know, one day, when I was sitting, I said, No. Sometimes to achieve some goals, some of the people will die or get hurt. It's like soldiers when they go to war. They wonât all come back."

But they leave a legacy -- not least, Hector Peterson.



A Hector Peterson memorial


Today, Soweto student Mamsie Tsosane says, "I think he was a hero. As young as he was, he was also in a struggle, fighting for his rights · and all those students, as well, for the whole of South Africa and black people as well.ä

But Sithole says there are far too many of the younger generation who don't know about the day her brother died or what he died for.

The Hector Peterson Memorial is being built to change all that. It will stand on the site where the apartheid police amassed to attack the students, within a stoneâs throw of where they shot and killed Hector Peterson. It will house the history.

Those who will work here, like Antoinette Sithole, hope that people will come not only from Soweto and South Africa, but that it will beckon people from all over the world to learn about what Hector Peterson and countless others sacrificed.

--------------------------------------------------------

http://archives.cnn.com/2001/WORLD/a...inside.africa/



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Old 06-20-2006, 12:44 AM   #8
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Originally posted by Harry Vest
I don't want to rain on anyone's parade here but isn't this Mbeki guy responsible for South Africa's horribly disgraceful stand on AIDS???
Thabo Mbeki is an absolute fool.

Nelson Mandela was - and still is - a brilliant man, and I have the utmost respect for him. My sister was born on the day he was released from prison and it's something that still makes my family and I proud. Just to have someone in our family associated with that day. Unfortunately, Madiba's successor doesn't even come close to his brilliance. Under Mbeki's rule, South Africa is starting to slide. If the "New South Africa" was all it is supposedly cracked up to be, I wouldn't be sitting on the other side of the world right now. A black person gets a job in South Africa these days, just because he is black. A black person gets into university these days, just because he is black. White South Africans are less-likely to get good jobs and a good education, just because they are white. It's reverse-apartheid, but you don't hear about it because white South Africans would be labelled as hypocrites if they kicked up a stink.

South Africa's going to turn into Zimbabwe and there's not a damn thing anyone can do about it. Fifty years along the line, I'll bet you we'll have some buffoon like Robert Mugabe in charge, ordering blacks to rape and kill white farmers. Just because. Considering that Thabo Mbeki doesn't even have the guts to call Mugabe out for the lunatic that he is, this shouldn't surprise anyone. "Quiet diplomacy," my poephol, Mbeki.

BTW, Jamila, it is extremely offensive to refer to it as "Apartheid Afrikaans" in any context. Extremely offensive. Not everyone who speaks Afrikaans is a black-hating-pitchfork-waving Boer. My surname and 50% of my family is as Afrikaaner as Pieter Willem Botha himself, and we think that apartheid was disgusting.
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Old 06-20-2006, 01:04 AM   #9
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yeah, umm... this thread is...

yeaaah...
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Old 06-20-2006, 07:04 AM   #10
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This thread is to remember the heroic sacrifices that the children of the Soweto uprising made to the freedom struggle of their country.

Sorry if that offends people.


The children of Soweto died in an attempt to retain the right to be taught in school in their languages, not the official language of the apartheid regime in South Africa (Afrikaans).


THAT IS HISTORICAL FACT.


Their deaths at the hands of the apartheid authorities due solely to this fact (that they refused to be taught in Afrikaans) GREATLY OFFENDED ME AND THE MILLIONS OF OTHERS AROUND THE WORLD WHO WERE PART OF THE INTERNATIONAL APARTHEID MOVEMENT IN THE 1980's.





Sad that in your attempts to attack me that you would misrepresent history and defame the sacrifice of these children.


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Old 06-20-2006, 07:08 AM   #11
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I was a student organizer and active member of the anti-apartheid student movement on my campus and in my community from 1985-1991.



It would be great if comments in FYM could stick to intelligent discussion of the issues and articles posted.


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Old 06-20-2006, 07:55 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jamila

Sad that in your attempts to attack me that you would misrepresent history and defame the sacrifice of these children.


Could you tell me exactly where in this thread anybody did either of these things you're accusing them of?
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Old 06-20-2006, 08:32 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jamila
It would be great if comments in FYM could stick to intelligent discussion of the issues and articles posted.
Comparison of posts on this thread:

Jamila's contributions: (1) cut-and-paste jobs that don't foster much in the way of discussion, as evidenced by the low amount of replies, or (2) side-stepping responses, levelling baseless allegations, and self-promoting statements about involvement in a movement (despite the fact that mere involvement does not equate to actual knowledge), complete with pointless bonodrum smiley.
GibsonGirl's contribution: an intelligent, articulate post by an actual South African who knows what she's talking about.

I know who I'd rather listen to.
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Old 06-20-2006, 08:58 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jamila
This thread is to remember the heroic sacrifices that the children of the Soweto uprising made to the freedom struggle of their country.

Sorry if that offends people.
Might I suggest that if you're going to just post articles and flame any attempt at some valid discussion, just post these things in your journal.

If you want to believe some brief newswire release over the experience of someone who is actually from South Africa, that's your business, but in FYM you can't claim ownership of threads just because you originally copied and pasted an article.
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Old 06-20-2006, 09:35 AM   #15
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um, i hate to be picky but if we're going to insist on respecting the memory of those who died maybe we could start be spelling it right, it's PIETERSON

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hector_Pieterson
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