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Old 04-18-2005, 08:46 AM   #1
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The UK elections

Is anyone else having trouble deciding who to vote for in the upcoming UK general election? I'd say I am a natural labour voter but I don't want to vote Labour because that would be endorsing Tony Blair's lies about the Iraq War. At the same time The Lib Dem's have unworkable policies like abolishing tuition fees (I'm a law student and I work every weekend and I still have enough time to study) mainly because we have far too many university places and far too many unnecessary degrees. Although I'm not against asylum seekers I liked what Michael Howard said about addressing imigration. I feel it would be hypocritical of me to be absolutely for letting as many asylum seekers in as possible as I don't live in an area that would really be effected by this. It seems one part of the goverments policy is to uphold unfair trade laws but the other part involves letting people into the UK from these very countries we discriminate against. Why not make trade fairer and decrease poverty in these countries. Poverty always brings out the worst in human beings (violence etc)so maybe if the world were a fairer place we wouldn't have people travelling half way across the world to get into Britain. It just seems like voting is a joke in Britain because Labour are definitely going to get in. In the Scottish Parliament we have proportional representation which seems fairer as your vote will always matter. I guess I'm a socialist with fascist tendencies, in other words I'm up for giving everyone a chance but some people are just SCUM and socialism or liberalism doesn't ever recognise that. Ok so it alot of criminals may be from broken homes etc and should be given a second chance but some are just scum through and through. Labour said they were "tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime". I haven't seen any evidence of this. For a start ASBO's are an absolute joke. Anyway that is my incoherent rant but I felt I had to get that off my chest.
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Old 04-18-2005, 08:49 AM   #2
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I'm not British but have been following the election campaign. A point made in today's Guardian is that most people are already fed up with the campaign and would rather the vote be held tomorrow and get it over with!

I'd probably vote Lib Dem if I had a vote, they are the party closest to my politics at present.
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Old 04-18-2005, 11:25 AM   #3
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I'll probably end up voting Lib Dem as well.
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Old 04-18-2005, 11:29 AM   #4
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I get my news from the BBC, so have been hearing a lot about these elections. I would probably vote Lib Dem or Labour, but again the Labour vote endorsing Blair's unjust war in Iraq would be hard to swallow. Couldn't see voting for the Conservative party and the quasi-zenophobia they seem to be advocating.
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Old 04-18-2005, 12:55 PM   #5
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Well the lib dems manifesto reflects my views the closest, but I have an absolute pathological hatred for Michael Howard (ie I don't really know why, but I can't even stand to see him on TV) so the idea of him being PM really turns my stomach. Therefore, I'm having a dilemma. do I vote for Lib Dems, which could be classed as a wasted vote as they're never going to get in, giving more of a chance for the creature of the night to gain power, or do I go for labour, thereby doing all I can to keep the tories out?

PS i would like to add that I also disagree with a lot of what the conservatives have to say, so I'm not basing my whole approach on an irrational (?!) hatred.

I just watched Jeremy Paxman interviewing Charles Kennedy, and I thought he came across very well. Mr Paxman did his usual trick of just pushing in with smart alec comments that made no sense, and Mr Kennedy kept his cool and reinforced his points very succesfully, I felt
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Old 04-18-2005, 12:58 PM   #6
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Out of interest, I'm wondering how much interest the USA is taking in our election?

I only ask, because when the US election was happening, we had a media whitewash. I couldnt' turn on the TV (or Interference) without hearing about Bush / Kerry. I'm interested to find out how much people care about whether Tony Blair (bush's right hand man) stays in power

If the Lib Dems got in, it would be pretty disastrous for Bush...
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Old 04-18-2005, 01:00 PM   #7
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I will be voting on the 5th, and I will be voting for New Labour.

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Old 04-18-2005, 01:15 PM   #8
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I don't know anything about this particular election, I've been distracted following the whole papal thing. My natural inclination if I were a British citizen would be to vote Labour, but I wouldn't want to endorse Blair's Iraq policy. So I'd probably vote Liberal Dem this time.
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Old 04-18-2005, 01:45 PM   #9
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http://kryogenix.org/code/conposter/index.php


I would normally say Green, but I would probably vote Lib Dem if I could vote (as would my husband, who would've been able to vote, had he registered in time).
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Old 04-18-2005, 02:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by bammo2
Out of interest, I'm wondering how much interest the USA is taking in our election?

I only ask, because when the US election was happening, we had a media whitewash. I couldnt' turn on the TV (or Interference) without hearing about Bush / Kerry. I'm interested to find out how much people care about whether Tony Blair (bush's right hand man) stays in power

sadly, because the news market in the US is ratings obsessed, there isn't too much coverage. i would say that most Americans could name at least the Tories and the Labour Party, but the Lib Dems are probably a new term. Tony Blair, especially going into the Iraq war, gets rather glowing coverage in the US media because, let's be honest, the man is a fucking brilliant politician -- no matter your view on Iraq, and i saw this as an opponent to the Iraq war -- and he, in contrast to our president, has a stirring command of the English language. i love watching Question Time on C-Span; very entertaining. i would say most americans might have a developed opinion on Tony Blair himself, especially since he was billed as a "political soul mate" for Clinton, and pretty much Bush's only friend in the whole wide world. however, the machinations of the election itself don't get any more coverage than other newsworthy events that occur outside the borders.

this is, i think, another example of both the reality of how power is distributed in the world -- the president of the US is the most powerful person on earth -- and the ratings-obsession (which leads to breathless, panting coverage of, say, Michael Jackson) in network news.

i, myself, have mixed feelings. i feel as if what i know about New Labour is closest to my own convictions, but there are so many domestic considerations that go into voting that i wouldn't pretend to know how i'd feel if i were a citizen of the UK. while i've spent weeks upon weeks in the UK, i have no idea how specific policies play out in real life. i think that's something many people outside the US forget -- they see our foreign policy, sure, but they don't realize the huge extent to which domestic issues -- issues that they know virtually nothing about -- decide elections, especially in congressional and senatorial races.
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Old 04-18-2005, 03:03 PM   #11
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I must admit that the day the pope died was the first day I'd turned on the news since before the presidential election. Good grief, if I'd given that up for Lent that would have been cheating because it's been completely painless. So for an FYMer, I'm out of the loop. The next news I get will be the new pope. After that, maybe the 2006 elections--??? This is the worst news burnout I've ever had in my life. It'll take the threat of Roy Moore becoming Governor of Alabama to make me get back into TV news. If he does become Governor, I'm probably burned out until the 2008 election. Whew!
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Old 04-18-2005, 04:50 PM   #12
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labor will be successful and
blair will remain in office


if blair stepped aside
labor would probably get 10 - 15% more of the vote
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Old 04-18-2005, 05:03 PM   #13
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Would it be possible to give an ignorant American a thumbnail sketch of the parties?

OK, I know Tony Blair--because Bush looked so freaking bad next to him and then I learned a little more.
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Old 04-18-2005, 05:22 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by BonosSaint
Would it be possible to give an ignorant American a thumbnail sketch of the parties?
Labour - left of centre, though no longer a socialist party. Roughly equivalent to the Democrats in America. The current Labour government has presided over significant increases in welfare & government expenditure without rolling back most of the Conservative tax cuts of previous Conservative administrations. In this regard, the strong economy has obviously benefited them.
Broadly speaking, they are Pro-European Union.

Conservatives - right of centre, traditionalist, strongly pro-free market. In favour of cutting taxes. Generally felt to have lost its way since 1997, with three different leaders since then. Some similarities to the GOP but without the "Christian conservative" influence which is not really a feature of British politics. Eurosceptic, i.e. sceptical of the benefits of the European Union for Britain. Interestingly, the Conservative leader was snubbed by Bush not long ago because he has expressed scepticism about the management of the Iraq war and related matters, although the Conservatives initially backed the Labour government on Iraq,

Liberal Democrats - historically middle of the road, although now probably to the left of Labour on some issues. Opposed the Iraq war, the only mainstream party to do so in Britain although there were a significant number of Labour rebels who voted against going into Iraq. Strongly pro-civil liberties but not against "big government" as such. Probably the most pro-European Union of the three main parties


By the way, I think Deep is absolutely spot on with his assessment above.
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Old 04-18-2005, 05:24 PM   #15
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Thank you.
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