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Old 03-06-2004, 07:00 PM   #16
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Melon you may want to check this link. It has some good info

http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/didache.html
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Old 03-06-2004, 07:04 PM   #17
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CHAPTER 6
AGAINST FALSE TEACHERS, AND FOOD OFFERED TO IDOLS
1) Be on your guard for many would like to lead you away from the way of the Teaching, for their priorities have no regard.
2) If you are able to bear the yoke, you will be perfect; but if you can't, you should make your best effort.
3) And concerning food, eat what is right but guard that you never eat that which is sacrificed to idols, for that is recognized as worship of the dead.
Point three seems to be in conflict with 1 Corinthians 8:

1Now about food sacrificed to idols: We know that we all possess knowledge.[1] Knowledge puffs up, but love builds up. 2The man who thinks he knows something does not yet know as he ought to know. 3But the man who loves God is known by God.
4So then, about eating food sacrificed to idols: We know that an idol is nothing at all in the world and that there is no God but one. 5For even if there are so-called gods, whether in heaven or on earth (as indeed there are many "gods" and many "lords"), 6yet for us there is but one God, the Father, from whom all things came and for whom we live; and there is but one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom all things came and through whom we live.
7But not everyone knows this. Some people are still so accustomed to idols that when they eat such food they think of it as having been sacrificed to an idol, and since their conscience is weak, it is defiled. 8But food does not bring us near to God; we are no worse if we do not eat, and no better if we do.
9Be careful, however, that the exercise of your freedom does not become a stumbling block to the weak. 10For if anyone with a weak conscience sees you who have this knowledge eating in an idol's temple, won't he be emboldened to eat what has been sacrificed to idols? 11So this weak brother, for whom Christ died, is destroyed by your knowledge. 12When you sin against your brothers in this way and wound their weak conscience, you sin against Christ. 13Therefore, if what I eat causes my brother to fall into sin, I will never eat meat again, so that I will not cause him to fall.
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Old 03-06-2004, 07:05 PM   #18
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The only known complete Didache in Greek is the Codex Hierosolymitanus, which was first published by Bryennios in 1883. The Greek Oxyrhynchus Papyrus No. 1782, dating from the late fourth century, contained fragments of a codex that preserved Didache 1:3b-4a and 2:7b to 3:2a in slightly variant and expanded form. A Coptic fragment from the fifth century contains Didache 10:3b through 12:1b,2a, and appends a prayer for oil at 10:8.

A nineteenth-century manuscript preserved at Constantinople contains a complete Georgian version of the Didache, the translation of which may be as early as the fifth century. It lacks Didache 1:5-6 and 13:5-7. The title includes the words "written in the year 90 or 100 after the Lord Christ." Although never published, readings were made available in 1931.

The Greek "Apostolic Constitutions" has many references to the Didache, re-worked with additional Scriptures and other traditions, as does the Ethiopic "Ecclesiastical Canons of the Apostles." Arabic versions both add and subtract from the Didache.

Several writers (Eusebius, about 325, and Athanasius of Alexandria in a letter of 367, etc.,) and lists from the beginning of the fourth century and onward refer to a writing known as the "Teaching" or "Teachings" of the Apostles, but inasmuch as nothing is specifically cited, we cannot be sure if the references are to the document we know today as the Didache.

Our present version of the ancient Didache is a reliable guide to help us understand the conduct code of the earliest Christian community.
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Old 03-06-2004, 08:03 PM   #19
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Concerning prophets:

[Q]11:9 But if he asks for money, he is a false prophet.[/Q]

[Q]11:20 And whoever shall say in the Spirit, Give me silver or anything else, you shall not listen to him;
11:21 But if he tell you to give on behalf of others that are in need, let no man judge him.[/Q]

Anyone know any Televangelists that come to mind?
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Old 03-06-2004, 09:27 PM   #20
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Originally posted by nbcrusader
Point three seems to be in conflict with 1 Corinthians 8
An example of St. Paul's duplicity. St. Paul's total opposition to the Mosaic Law versus St. Peter and St. James' insistence on its complete adherence led to a compromise, which is listed in Acts 15, which is what the Didache here refers to. What is not mentioned, however, is that St. Paul and his Gentile church never adhered to that compromise at all, and St. Paul went further on his insistence that Jesus was the fulfillment of the Mosaic Law, and, thus, is replaced by Jesus' sole commandment to "love one another" (and made more explicit in Romans 13).

This conflict is really one of my primary reasons as to why I believe this to be Jewish Christian in origin.

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Old 03-06-2004, 11:13 PM   #21
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OK...take it down a notch boys, and remember I am drugged up....

Help me understand the conflict.
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Old 03-07-2004, 02:23 PM   #22
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NB and Melon....I am still trying to keep up with you.....

This author had this to say about the verse you were chatting about:

[Q]6:3 Concerning food, bear what you can, but carefully keep away from food sacrificed to idols, for it is a worship-service to gods from the realm of the dead.

The prohibition against eating food sacrificed to idols was one part of the decision of the Council of Jerusalem in AD 49. The entire decision was sent as a letter to all the churches (Acts 15:20-29, 21:25), so why doesn't the Didache include all of it? [/Q]
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Old 03-07-2004, 02:33 PM   #23
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[Q]Content Analysis
The Didache contains some material that is also in Matthew and Luke, rather a lot that is only in Matthew, and much that is not in any of the canonized gospels, but -- and this is remarkable -- it contains virtually nothing that is found in Mark.

How could that have happened? If the Didache was based on Matthew, as most New Testament scholars assume, how did the writer manage to exclude virtually everything that Matthew copied from Mark? And even if he had both of those gospels open in front of him, why would he want to do that?

A more likely hypothesis is:

Sayings of Jesus were probably in wide circulation in both oral and written form. The Didache refers to a collection of the sayings of Jesus known as "The Gospel of the Lord" but none of the four canonized gospels. Mark wrote his Gospel based on the preaching of Peter, as most New Testament scholars maintain. Matthew had the Didache and copied from it as he did from Mark: that would explain the origin of the passages that are only in the Didache and Matthew. Luke compiled his Gospel from several sources, including Mark, but he did not have the Didache.

Much of the material in the Didache is also in Acts and/or the Epistles of Paul. The style of these parts is typical of Paul.

The common source for parts of the Didache and the Epistle of Barnabas is not very difficult to ascertain. If we were to compare two sermons by Billy Graham, one given in the 1950s and the other in the 1990s, many phrases and even whole sentences would be virtually identical, but not in the same sequence -- which is precisely what we find in the Didache and the Epistle of Barnabas. Therefore, the most probable source is Barnabas himself, early and late in his career.

The Didache shows several abrupt changes in vocabulary, phrasing, and ways of addressing an audience that capture the "voices" of three different speakers. In sum, it reads like a set of lecture notes taken by someone listening to three people.
Historical Context
Many strong parallels point to Paul and Barnabas as the apostles involved in this teaching. If so, what we know about them from other sources brackets the time and place in which the Didache was written.

The followers of Jesus first preached the gospel only to Jews. After several years, some of them started preaching to Gentiles in Antioch of Syria, many of whom were converted. When the leaders of the church in Jerusalem heard about this, they sent Barnabas to Antioch. He found a sizable congregation and many more people eager to hear about Jesus. So Barnabas went to Tarsus and brought Paul to Antioch. They taught there together for a year. (Acts 11:19-26)
Now in these days prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. And one of them named Agabus stood up and foretold by the spirit that there would be a great famine over all the world, and this took place in the days of Claudius. And the disciples determined, every one according to his ability, to send relief to the brethren who lived in Judea; and they did so, sending it to the elders by the hand of Barnabas and Paul. (Acts 11:27-30)
Historical sources say there was a great famine in Judea in AD 47. Therefore, Acts 12:1-23 may be misplaced in Luke's otherwise chronological report. "About that time" King Herod killed James the brother of John and arrested Peter; but Peter escaped from prison, and King Herod died at Caesarea. There are historical records that King Herod (Agrippa I) died during a festival at Caesarea in AD 44. Luke adds a time-space: "But the word of God grew and multiplied" (Acts 12:24).

In his epistle to the Galatians, Paul wrote:
Then after fourteen years, I went up again to Jerusalem with Barnabas, taking Titus along with me. I went up by revelation; and I laid before them (but privately before those who were of repute) the gospel which I preach among the Gentiles, lest somehow I should be running or had run in vain. (Galatians 2:1-2)
Fourteen years after Paul's first visit to Jerusalem probably equates to AD 47. The Didache may be what Paul laid before the leaders in Jerusalem -- a summary document prepared in advance for just that purpose -- or more likely from the way it sounds, a set of lecture notes taken while Barnabas and Paul and Titus were speaking. In either case it is worth noting that in the Didache and in Acts 15:12 Barnabas speaks first. He was the leader at Antioch. Paul was his assistant.
when they perceived the grace that was given to me, James and Peter and John, who were reputed to be pillars, gave to me and Barnabas the right hand of fellowship, that we should go to the Gentiles and they to the circumcised. (Galatians 2:9)
This was when Barnabas and Paul received their charter as "The Apostles to the Gentiles." They returned from Jerusalem to Antioch, bringing Mark with them. (Acts 12:25) Shortly thereafter, all three of them set out on Paul's first missionary journey, which scholars date in AD 47. (Acts 13:1-4)

They went from Antioch to and through the island of Cyprus, and then north to what is now the southern coast of Turkey. There Mark left them and went back to Jerusalem. Paul and Barnabas went on establishing new churches in the Roman province of Galatia. They returned to the coast by the way they came, sailed back to Antioch of Syria, and "remained no little time with the disciples." (Acts 13 - 14)
But some men came down from Jerusalem [to Antioch] and were teaching the brethren, "Unless you are circumcised according to the custom of Moses, you cannot be saved." (Acts 15:1)
Paul's letter to the Galatians was probably written at this time. No doubt, men from Jerusalem also told his converts in Galatia that they had to be circumcised. Paul was angry because the leaders in Jerusalem had broken their agreement by sending men to the Gentiles. Thus, his letter to the Galatians was written in late AD 48 or early AD 49.
Paul and Barnabas and some of the others were appointed to go [from Antioch] up to Jerusalem to the apostles and the elders about this question. (Acts 15:2b)
Scholars date the Apostolic Council of Jerusalem in AD 49. The controversy was not between Paul and Peter. After all, Peter was the one who first preached the gospel to Gentiles (Acts 11:1-3). It was between Paul and "the circumcision party" led by James of Jerusalem, the brother of Jesus (Galatians 2:12).

Peter spoke first, in favor of preaching the gospel to Gentiles. Then Barnabas and Paul presented their case. Finally, James of Jerusalem yielded. The decision was that Gentiles did not have to become Jews in order to be Christians, but they must: "Abstain from what has been sacrificed to idols and from blood and from what is strangled and from unchastity." (Acts 15:6-21, 29) The first part of this decision is in the Didache (6:3); the other three provisions apparently were added to it by the "apostles and elders" in Jerusalem.

With their charter thus reaffirmed, Paul and Barnabas were ready to carry the decision of the Apostolic Council back to the churches they established. Barnabas wanted to take Mark with them again, but Paul objected because Mark left them during their previous journey. Paul and Barnabas quarreled. Finally, Barnabas took Mark with him and went back to Cyprus (Acts 15:36-39). This is the last we hear of Barnabas in the New Testament, except for an indication that he was still preaching the gospel several years later (I Corinthians 9:6).

The long title of the Didache in the manuscript dated 1056 reads: "The Teaching of the Lord by the Twelve Apostles to the Gentiles" but I believe the original title was "The Teaching of the Apostles to the Gentiles" and the rest was inserted later.

Certainly Barnabas and Paul were "The Apostles to the Gentiles." If the Didache is a sample of their teaching, as it certainly seems to be, then it must be dated no later than AD 49 because that was when they went their separate ways. The most probable date is either AD 44 or AD 47. In either case, those dates are earlier than anything in the New Testament. Therefore, I believe the Didache is the earliest Christian document we have. Although rightly regarded as a church handbook and not a Gospel or absolutely based on the teachings of Jesus, it provides valuable insights concerning the moral doctrines, theology, rituals, esoteric operations and congregational testing of apostles and prophets, and the basic organization of First Century Christianity. [/Q]
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