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Old 05-08-2010, 07:08 PM   #871
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Senator Robert Bennett of Utah



Wait a minute... he's not black. In fact, give this guy a three-cornered hat and a misspelled anti-Obama sign and he would be the perfect posterold-rich-white-guy for the Tea Party.

Now I'm really
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Old 05-08-2010, 07:11 PM   #872
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Senator Robert Bennett of Utah



Wait a minute... he's not black. Why, he could even be posterold-rich-white-guy for the Tea Party.

Now I'm really
Their racism knows no bounds.
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Old 05-08-2010, 07:16 PM   #873
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MN had been a reliable Dem state up until recently.

Things change.
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Old 05-09-2010, 08:29 PM   #874
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MN had been a reliable Dem state up until recently.

Things change.
For some reason not at the Gov. position. No Dem since 1991.


Our best known MN Tea Bagger could get beat. Bachmann is so full of nothing, I don't know how she functions.

MN Progressive Project:: Poll indicates Michele Bachmann might be in trouble
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Old 05-11-2010, 01:45 AM   #875
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This Kentucy Senate race will go to the Tea Party.

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Front-runner Rand Paul said in a U.S. Senate debate Monday night that he may not support Kentucky's other senator, Mitch McConnell, for minority floor leader if he's elected.

"I'd have to know who the opponent is and make a decision at that time," Paul said in a sometimes testy televised debate, the final face off in what has become an increasing acrimonious race to replace Sen. Jim Bunning.

His chief Republican opponent, Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson, said he "proudly" would vote for McConnell. McConnell endorsed Grayson in the May 18 primary. South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint, who endorsed Paul, has been mentioned as a potential McConnell opponent for minority leader, though DeMint has said he has no such intention.

Paul is considered an outsider to the Republican political establishment, which has supported Grayson. Paul, a Bowling Green eye surgeon, is leading in the polls.

Paul has strong backing from tea party activists, who have been increasingly showing their political power this year. They most recently helped topple three-term Republican Sen. Robert F. Bennett of Utah at that state's GOP convention over the weekend.

Paul took a hard line against congressional earmarks during the debate, saying he is philosophically opposed to pork barrel projects that have been used to pay for programs across Kentucky unless Congress has the money in hand to pay for them. Grayson said some of the earmarks, like those used to fight drug trafficking, are vitally needed and he would support them.

The eventual Republican nominee will face one of five Democratic candidates, including Lt. Gov. Daniel Mongiardo and Attorney General Jack Conway.

Paul and Grayson are the only two Republicans who have enough money to run competitive campaigns. Each candidate had raised about $2.4 million as of mid-April, with most of the money being spent on TV advertising. Both sides have been airing attack ads in recent weeks.

Grayson ads have accused Paul of being unfriendly to the coal industry, a key segment of the Kentucky economy employing some 17,000 people, and of being soft on abortion, an important issue among the state's evangelical voters. Paul ads have accused Grayson of being part of the Washington establishment and have tried to connect Grayson, a former Democrat, to President Barack Obama.

Kentucky's two sitting Senators are on opposite sides in the race, with Bunning giving Paul his endorsement.

Bunning, who was considered politically vulnerable to potential Democratic challengers, dropped his re-election bid because he had been unable to raise enough money to mount a formidable campaign. Bunning blamed McConnell and other Republican leaders for drying up his fundraising, so when the Republican establishment got behind Grayson, a chafed Bunning threw his support to Paul, calling him "a man of integrity" and "the only true conservative" in the race.

Paul is the son of Texas congressman Ron Paul, who made an unsuccessful bid for the GOP presidential nomination in 2008. The younger Paul has capitalized on his father's political base for fundraising.

Besides McConnell, Grayson has won endorsements from former Vice President Dick Cheney and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. He also has the endorsement of U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers, a revered political figure in heavily Republican southeastern Kentucky.

Paul has endorsements from former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, former GOP presidential candidate Steve Forbes and evangelical leader James Dobson.
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Old 05-11-2010, 01:51 AM   #876
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For some reason not at the Gov. position. No Dem since 1991.


Our best known MN Tea Bagger could get beat. Bachmann is so full of nothing, I don't know how she functions.

MN Progressive Project:: Poll indicates Michele Bachmann might be in trouble
Governorships don't seem to follow as much as Senate seats.
your congressional delegation is 5 Dems to 3 GOP

CA and NY, very Blue states with history of GOP Govs.

and Red states UT and AZ have had recent Dem Govs.
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Old 05-11-2010, 08:00 AM   #877
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Paul has endorsements from former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, former GOP presidential candidate Steve Forbes and evangelical leader James Dobson.
Well, golly, sign this guy up.

Those endorsements should be a kiss of death instead of the thing that gets you elected. I can't wait for this to be over.
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Old 05-11-2010, 10:01 AM   #878
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Governorships don't seem to follow as much as Senate seats.
your congressional delegation is 5 Dems to 3 GOP

CA and NY, very Blue states with history of GOP Govs.

and Red states UT and AZ have had recent Dem Govs.
Very true. But our strong 3rd Party showing in the state has been a big factor.

Independence Party endorses Tom Horner for governor | StarTribune.com


I don't know which governor was last elected with a majority of votes, probably Carlson 16 years ago. I wish we had a run-off law so that state-wide races required a majority vote.
I would trade Senator Franken for not having Governor Pawlenty for the last 8 years.
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Old 05-14-2010, 11:09 AM   #879
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MAMA GRIZZLIES!!!


slate.com

Is the Tea Party a Feminist Movement? It's becoming an insta-network for aspiring female candidates.


By Hanna Rosin Posted Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at 12:03 PM ET

In a different political season, Lou Ann Zelenik would be too much an outsider to run for a congressional seat in Tennessee. A single mother, she owned a heavy construction company until she retired in 2007. She likes to remind people that she's a "licensed blaster," which refers both to her technical skills and her Rosie the Riveter attitude. "She's bucked every trend, and if there's ever an obstacle put in her way she breaks right through it," says her spokesman, Jay Heine. Zelenik only really broke through in electoral politics, however, when she got involved with the local Tea Party. She put together a rally in Murfreesboro, and 3,000 people showed up. She hooked into a network of activist local moms who agreed to volunteer on her campaign. "A lot of the tea party women are inspired by seeing a strong woman run for office," adds Heine.


Is the Tea Party a women's movement? More women than men belong—55 percent, according to the latest Quinnipiac poll. And while no movement that uses Michelle Malkin as a poster girl could fairly be described as feminist, the party has become an insta-network for ambitious women like Zelenik. Some are aspiring candidates who could never get traction within the tight, local Republican Party networks. Some are angry-mom-activist types who, like their heroine Sarah Palin, outgrew the PTA. But some would surprise you with their straightforward feminist rage. For the last few years Anna Barone, a Tea Party leader from Mount Vernon, N.Y., has used the e-mail handle annaforhillary.com: "The way they treated Hillary is unforgiveable, and then they did it to Sarah Palin," she said. "I've been to 15 Tea Party meetings and never heard a woman called a name just because she's powerful. I guess you could say the Tea Party is where I truly became a feminist."

If the Tea Party has any legitimate national leadership, it is dominated by women. Of the eight board members of the Tea Party Patriots who serve as national coordinators for the movement, six are women. Fifteen of the 25 state coordinators are women. One of the three main sponsors of the Tax Day Tea Party that launched the movement is a group called Smart Girl Politics. The site started out as a mommy blog and has turned into a mobilizing campaign that trains future activists and candidates. Despite its explosive growth over the last year, it is still operated like a feminist cooperative, with three stay-at-home moms taking turns raising babies and answering e-mails and phone calls. Spokeswoman Rebecca Wales describes it as a group made up of "a lot of mama bears worried about their families." The Tea Party, she says, is a natural home for women because "for a long time people have seen the parties as good-ole'-boy, male-run institutions. In the Tea Party, women have finally found their voice."

Some of Wales' mama bears are the heirs of old-timey political movements like the Temperance Movement, which women led as keepers of moral purity and domestic harmony. Their more immediate inspiration is the conservative-mom revolution of the mid-1990s. During the Gingrich revolution, a crew of evangelical moms came in, vowing to protect traditional family values. At that time, there was still some ambivalence among conservatives about women abandoning their domestic duties to run for public office. I recall back then interviewing Vern Smith, husband of Linda Smith, then a new Republican congresswoman from Washington. "It's funny, with Linda away, we end up sacrificing some of that traditional family life to pass some of that heritage to our children," he told me.

Now that ambivalence is mostly gone. The conservative woman in public office or otherwise working too hard is an accepted breed. Her rise was accelerated by the recession, which pushed millions more women into the work force, sometimes as the family's only breadwinner. The stay-at-home mom is a vanishing type anyway; only one in five families has a working father and stay-at-home mother. And then there's Sarah Palin, who created a whole new model of mother activist. None of the contradictions got worked out: She works; she has small children; she defends the traditional family although she's probably home only one day a week. Never mind, after 20 years, conservatives have made peace with her type, and embraced it.

And so the conservative mama bear has become a fully operational, effective political archetype. She is mother as übercompetent CEO, monitoring with vigilance her own family bank account, the local school bank account, and, as a natural extension, the nation's. "Women are sitting at home and balancing their checkbook, leaving money for groceries and utilities and fun stuff," says Jenny Beth Martin, one of the Patriots' national coordinators. "They realize that these things that apply to their household budgets also apply to government." In explaining their view on the stimulus money, several Tea Party mama bears used examples they'd heard at PTA meetings. Why should the school waste money on a part-time Chinese teacher who gets full benefits? Why should the government waste money on ant farms and exotic fish?

Christen Varley is the president of the Boston Tea Party. Last year, her husband spent some time without a job. And so, after 11 years of staying home with their daughter, Varley got part-time work at a nonprofit. She also got involved in local politics and last year, started a tea party branch. At the meetings, equal numbers of men and women show up. But women end up being more dedicated. They write the newsletters and put together the database. When the group first put together the steering committee, it had four men and two women. "We ought to have a few more women," she thought, so she added some. "We're more likely to get fired up," she says. "Women take it personally. These are my kids they're coming after."

Mostly what Varley likes is that the movement feels like an actual tea party. She used to go to Republican town committee meetings, but except for the annual Christmas party, it was all "work, work, work." At Tea Party meetings, the women "get together and commiserate, and cheerlead each other. When the media and the culture demonize us, we feel good that there are other people just like us. We're building a lot of friendships."

The mama bears are not the only type of women in the movement. Local parties in Seattle, New York, and California, for example, breed more-straightforward feminists. (Remember annaforhillary.com.) Some of the women I interviewed are longtime women's activists who feel alienated from both parties and are happy to have a fresh start. Betty Jean Kling runs a group called Majority United, dedicated to getting more women in office and fighting violence against women. Like many activists I talked to, Kling thinks social issues such as abortion are just wedges to drive women apart. (Varley, who is Catholic and pro-life, said the same thing: "We would be stupid to bring up abortion at a meeting.")

Kling says the two parties "just throw crumbs to women" and insult them. She has given over her radio show to women Tea Party activists and candidates, and started a network of local chapters. "Each woman has her reasons for joining," she says, "but I would like to believe that deep down she has a degree of pride in knowing that when she is voting out the incumbents she may be voting in a new woman with new ideas who will be really amenable to women's rights."

Like other Tea Party ideologies, the movement's feminist streak is not always consistent or coherent. But affiliated women candidates take away a unifying narrative that taps into both traditionalism and feminist rage. It's the feminism of the 1980 Dolly Parton movie 9 to 5, part anger against the good ole' boys and part "leave me alone." Candidate Liz Carter complains about the lack of women in any congressional seats in Georgia. Fox analyst Angela McGowan, running for Congress in Mississippi, calls herself a "warrior." Christine O'Donnell, running for Senate in Delaware, claims she's an antidote to the "lords of the back room." Lords of the back room. There's a phrase Germaine Greer would have liked.
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Old 05-14-2010, 11:37 AM   #880
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so, apparently, and i don't really plan on paying to see it, but Ridley Scott has turned history's second most beloved socialist (the most beloved is Jesus, obvy) into a Teabagger:

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/gog/mo...l?hpid=topnews

Dark and polemic, Ridley Scott's "Robin Hood" is less about a band of merry men than a whole country of really angry ones. At times, it feels like a political attack ad paid for by the tea party movement, circa 1199. Set in an England that has been bankrupted by years of war in the Middle East -- in this case, the Crusades -- it's the story of a people who are being taxed to death by a corrupt government, under an upstart ruler who's running the country into the ground. It asks: What's a man of principle to do?

If you said, "Steal from the rich, and give to the poor," you must be thinking of the old Robin Hood. The correct answer here is: "Don't retreat, reload." There are more arrows flying every which way than you've ever seen -- through the face, the neck, the chest, the back. It's a pincushion of a movie.

There is, however, precious little of the socialist stuff that we normally associate with the man in tights in this new, politicized version, which ends precisely where most tellings of the legend begin: with Robin Hood being declared an outlaw and moving to a camp in the woods with Maid Marion, Little John, Friar Tuck and the rest of them. In other words, it's a prequel to the movie that many of us remember. Except for the last five minutes, "Robin Hood" is the story of the radicalization of some guy named Longstride.

Who?

Robin Longstride (Russell Crowe) is a common bowman -- call him Joe the Archer -- in the army of King Richard the Lionheart. Danny Huston, who plays Richard, seems to have taken the name a little too literally, wearing a wig reminiscent of the Cowardly Lion's hair in "The Wizard of Oz."

On the way back from the Crusades, Richard is killed, whereupon Robin ends up carrying Richard's crown back to England and into the hands of Richard's brother, the treacherous, unseasoned Prince John (Oscar Isaac).

But Robin's also on a second delivery run, having agreed to return a sword belonging to a slain nobleman, Sir Robert Loxley (Douglas Hodge), to Loxley's family in Nottingham. In order to avoid accusations of theft, Robin temporarily assumes Loxley's identity.

When our hero rides up to the Loxley estate, however, he's not only asked to stay by Robert's father, Walter (Max von Sydow), but -- as improbable as it sounds -- to continue the impersonation, living as husband and wife with Robert's hot widow, Marion (Cate Blanchett). Without a man, see, Marion would lose the land when Walter dies.

It's here, as lord of the manor, that Robin's re-education begins. But not, as in every other "Robin Hood," at the hands of the sheriff of Nottingham (Matthew Macfadyen), who's relegated to benchwarmer status here. The real bad guy of the picture is Sir Godfrey (Mark Strong), the newly crowned King John's chief tax enforcer. While pillaging village after village, he's secretly working as a spy for the French, who hope to take advantage of the civil unrest he's sowing by invading England.

Yeah, it's complicated. And the numerous on-screen titles, which identify the ever-shifting locations -- Barnsdale one minute, Berkhamsted Castle the next -- don't really help. There's so much backroom palace intrigue going on that the movie can start to sound like an episode of "The Sopranos" after a while. "He knows too much," says Godfrey at one point. "Get rid of him." Gruesomely disfigured by one of Robin's arrows, and clad all in black, he looms as large as Darth Vader.

But Mafia and "Star Wars" overtones aren't the only odd ingredients in "Robin Hood," which was written by Brian Helgeland ("L.A. Confidential"). Godfrey's Gestapo tactics are straight out of a Holocaust movie. And the film's climactic battle -- set on a beach beset by a fleet of French troops against whom Robin has rallied the English people -- is weirdly reminiscent of the D-Day scene in "Saving Private Ryan."

So where's the room for Robin Hood -- the derring-do, the dash -- amid all this clutter? Unfortunately, there isn't much. Crowe makes an especially dour Robin. The actor looks grim, puffy and haggard throughout, except for one brief scene in which he strips out of his chain mail -- with the help of Marion -- for a long-overdue bath, revealing a buff if battle-scarred physique. He just doesn't seem to be having that much fun.

Not that the movie is completely without it. Mark Addy makes for a jolly, dipsomaniacal Friar Tuck; Kevin Durand, a goofy and lumbering Little John. And Blanchett's Marion, who takes up arms alongside the best of the men, is a feisty, feminist treat.

But the Robin Hood of myth and moviedom is for the most part AWOL. Why should we have to wait until the last five minutes to see Crowe crack a smile, let alone split an arrow? The film's closing title screen -- which reads "And so the legend begins" -- suggests that if you want to see that movie, you may have to wait for "Robin Hood II."

this is the worst case of pandering to the basest instincts of non-coastal America since the NFL version of the "stuck in a moment" video.
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Old 05-14-2010, 03:07 PM   #881
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why?

Is it wrong for Longstride (interesting name) to
Want his Country Back!
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Old 05-20-2010, 01:02 PM   #882
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Tea Party Express leader Mark Williams says 'sorry' - to Hindus - for slamming Muslim's 'monkey god'

Days after writing that Muslims worship "the terrorists' monkey god," embattled Tea Party leader Mark Williams apologized for his insensitivity - to Hindus.

"In the course of the article I described the 'god' worshiped by terrorists as 'a monkey god.' I was wrong and that was offensive. I owe an apology to millions of Hindus who worship Lord Hanuman, an actual Monkey God," Williams wrote Wednesday night.

The original blog post equated the proposed Mosque adjacent to Ground Zero to a monument to the 9/11 terrorists.

Williams, chairman of the Tea Party Express and frequent CNN contributor, was denounced by Muslim leaders and politicians like Mayor Bloomberg for the "appalling" comment.

Williams did not apologize to Muslims in the new blog post. Instead, he used the apology to Hundus as another way to attack Muslims.

"Hanuman is worshiped as a symbol of perseverance, strength and devotion. He is known as a destroyer of evil and to inspire and liberate. Those are hardly the traits of whatever the Hell (literally) it is that terrorists worship and worthy of my respect and admiration not ridicule."

"So, again, to my Hindu friends, I offer my sincerest apologies for my horrible lapse and my insensitivity. It was unintentional, inexplicably ignorant and I am ashamed at my offense toward you."
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Old 05-20-2010, 01:09 PM   #883
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Ignorance and insensitivity...

shock and awe...
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Old 05-20-2010, 01:34 PM   #884
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what's that about Tea Baggers not being racist again?
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Old 05-20-2010, 08:59 PM   #885
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Or stupid?
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