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Old 11-09-2006, 12:59 AM   #316
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Hey, A Wanderer: you're mssing the point. I said that if the polls has indicated that the Republicans would win yesterday, and the Dems ended up winning, I would not have regretted my decision to sit out the voting process this time around. I didn't think the abuses of 2000 would be repeated in 2004, but they were, and by BOTH parties. I monitored the vote tallies on this site has they came in that night. When evidence surfaced of systematic Democratic abuse, I decided that I would skip voting in '06. I did. Now, maybe there were irregularities....I will wait to see....but this time, (unlike in 2004, when people were trying to warn us) there were monitors etc. And in my mind, if a Democratic victory in Virginia was achived in a razor-thin race with Diebold voting machines that left no paper trail, how much abuse could the Dems have pulled off?


I will wait and see if there was abuse, but it seems that mostly, things are back on track....and I might vote agian, 2 yrs from now.
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Old 11-09-2006, 04:08 AM   #317
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Originally posted by I'm Ready
being somewhat of a political novice, can someone explain to me the house and senate can now prevent bush from doing in the final two years?
What we have right now is a stalemate (a little better than a stalemate if the Democrats do get the Senate). In practical matters:

1. The House controls the money.
2. The Senate can block the confirmation of any nominee
that it finds inappropriate. (Justice Stevens is feeling
a little poorly) The President will find it a little more difficult
to get his way in his picks.
3. The President may be more cautious in pursuing heretofore
persidentially approved activity because the chance of
investigation has just gone up 100%.
4. The President, who does not like to compromise, will
have to compromise if he wants to get anything passed.
Although the President can veto (or get around a veto
by his infamous signing statements), injudicious use of
veto guarantees that he will not be able to work with
Congress to get anything he wants. If nothing else
(and I hope it's more than this), Congress can sit on its
tail and just block everything the President wants to do.
Having expended all his political capital (even with his
own party), the President is in for a very lonely two years
unless he is willing to work with the President.
5. It reduces the chance of the Republicans tacking on
dumbass political agenda codicils to bills the Democrats
want (ie, estate tax abolishment tacked on to minimum
wage increase) It also increases the chance of Democrats
doing the same.

All this, of course, is dependent on the respective new Majority Leader and Speaker being able to keep the Democrats in line, which is why you will be seeing these novice moderate and conservative Senators and Representatives being given plum committee assignments and pork to take home.

My guess is that the Democrats will run a very tight ship.
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Old 11-09-2006, 05:39 AM   #318
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Quote:
Originally posted by VertigoGal

I'm reeeeally excited about the results of this election, but I'm already nervous to see whether they can actually- say- put together a cohesive image/policy? I know that'd be a lot to ask of them.


I'm as giddy as the next person about this election. But I think I'm happier about the voters finally showing muscle and starting to take back their influence. (For the record, I thought the Democrats deserved losing the House in 1994.)

But this is a complex electorate. It is not just about the Iraq war
(although I think that was hugely significant). It's about many conservatives looking and saying "Hey, these aren't conservatives; we've been had." It's about the religious right starting to realize they were being used by politicians who only mouthed their values. It's about a base that began to think it was being taken for granted. It's about liberals (and many moderates) who think this guy is dangerous. And it's about a growing number of people who think he's delusional. It's about the war, incompetence, scandal, executive power usurping well beyond comfort level, misdirection, betrayal, the sharp drop in our standing around the world and an arrogance divorced from reality about its own performance. The President and the Republicans forced the hand of even the previously indifferent voter to say "Stop!"

The one thing I've found consistent is that the electorate does not like the country moving too far left or too far right and they will come out to vote to make a correction.

U2democrat, your party's going to have to deliver. You've got your work cut out for you.
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Old 11-09-2006, 05:42 AM   #319
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Lieberman is going to be a very interesting wild card in all this.
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Old 11-09-2006, 06:12 AM   #320
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Hey, Webb won Virginia! Democrats won the Congress! I am not even an American but I am pretty happy, I must say.

Democrats win control of Congress

WASHINGTON - In a rout once considered almost inconceivable, Democrats won a 51st seat in the Senate and regained total control of Congress after 12 years of near-domination by the Republican Party.

The shift dramatically alters the government's balance of power, leaving President Bush without GOP congressional control to drive his legislative agenda. Democrats hailed the results and issued calls for bipartisanship even as they vowed to investigate administration policies and decisions.

Democrats completed their sweep Wednesday evening by ousting Republican Sen. George Allen (news, bio, voting record) of Virginia, the last of six GOP incumbents to lose re-election bids in a midterm election marked by deep dissatisfaction with the president and the war in Iraq.

Democrats had 229 seats in the House, 11 more than the number necessary to hold the barest of majorities in the 435-member chamber.

"In Iraq and here at home, Americans have made clear they are tired of the failures of the last six years," said Sen. Harry Reid (news, bio, voting record) of Nevada, in line to become Senate Majority leader when Congress reconvenes in January.

As watershed elections go, this one rivaled the GOP's takeover in 1994, which made Newt Gingrich speaker of the House, the first Republican to run the House since the Eisenhower administration. This time the shift comes in the midst of an unpopular war, a Congress scarred by scandal and just two years from a wide-open presidential contest.

Allen lost to Democrat Jim Webb, a former Republican who served as Navy secretary in the Reagan administration. A count by The Associated Press showed Webb with 1,172,538 votes and Allen with 1,165,302, a difference of 7,236. Allen was awaiting the result statewide postelection canvass of votes and did not concede the race.

Democrats will have nine new senators on their side of the aisle as a result of Tuesday's balloting. Six of them defeated sitting Republican senators from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Missouri, Rhode Island, Montana and Virginia. The other three replaced retiring senators from Maryland, Minnesota and Vermont.

Their ideologies are as varied as their home states. Bernie Sanders, an independent who will replace Vermont Sen. Jim Jeffords, is a Socialist who has served in the House and voted with Democrats since 1990. Bob Casey Jr., who defeated Republican Sen. Rick Santorum (news, bio, voting record) in Pennsylvania, is an anti-abortion moderate. Webb once declared that the sight of President Clinton returning a Marine's salute infuriated him.

Besides the Webb-Allen race, the Montana Senate contest also was too tight to call early Wednesday. But by midday, Democrat Jon Tester outdistanced Republican Sen. Conrad Burns (news, bio, voting record), who had to fight off campaign miscues as well as his ties to Jack Abramoff, the once super-lobbyist caught in an influence-peddling scheme.

In the House, 10 races remained too tight to call, with three of them leaning to the Democrats. Rep. Nancy Pelosi (news, bio, voting record), who would become the first female speaker in history, called for harmony and said Democrats would not abuse their new status.

She said she would be "the speaker of the House, not the speaker of the Democrats." She said Democrats would aggressively conduct oversight of the administration, but said any talk of impeachment of President Bush "is off the table."

In the Senate, Sen. Charles Schumer (news, bio, voting record) of New York, the head of the Democrats' Senate campaign committee, said, "We had a tough and partisan election, but the American people and every Democratic senator — and I've spoken to just about all of them — want to work with the president in a bipartisan way."

http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/rss...tion_rdp:wink:
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Old 11-09-2006, 07:29 AM   #321
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Quote:
Originally posted by BonosSaint

U2democrat, your party's going to have to deliver. You've got your work cut out for you.
Trust me I know...following 12 years of GOP control is never going to be easy. Hopefully people will be patient as the Dems get their bearings. They've got to get to know each other, too!
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Old 11-09-2006, 08:43 AM   #322
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(Reuters) Young Americans voted in the largest numbers in at least 20 years in congressional elections, energized by the Iraq war and giving a boost to Democrats, pollsters said on Wednesday.

About 24 percent of Americans under the age of 30, or at least 10 million young voters, cast ballots in Tuesday's elections that saw Democrats make big gains in Congress. That was up 4 percentage points from the last mid-term elections in 2002.

"This looks like the highest in 20 years," said Mark Lopez, research director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, which compiled the data based on exit polls. "Unfortunately, we can't say if it's a record because don't have good comparable data before 1986."

Rock the Vote, a youth-and-civics group, said young voters favored Democrats by a 22-point margin, nearly three times the margin Democrats earned among other age groups and dealing a potentially decisive blow to Republicans in tight races.

"The turnout was awesome," said 21-year-old Katryn Fraher, a political science major at the University of New Mexico who helped build a giant map of local polling stations for her school and was among a group of students walking the campus on Tuesday with a blackboard that counted down the time to vote.

But despite the big turnout, it may not be a record.

In the 1982 mid-term election during the Reagan administration, youth turnout reached 27 percent, but that was among voters aged between 18 to 24 instead of under 30 as measured by Wednesday's exit poll estimates.

Republican pollster Ed Goeas said young voters could have swayed a number of tight races on Tuesday, noting that of 28 seats Democrats picked up from Republicans in the 435-member House of Representatives, 22 were won by less than 2 percent of the vote and 18 were won by just 5,000 votes or less.

"The increase in the youth vote did come into play," he said.

GETTING OUT THE VOTE

As Republicans fought to keep control of Congress, both parties sought to rally young voters who turned out in record numbers in the 2004 presidential election.

At the University of Iowa, some students doubled as "Human Vote Billboards" with messages exhorting students to vote in the battleground state where Democrats won several races.

"It went well," said Brant Miller, 24, at the University of Iowa. "We got a bunch of students to get out there and vote."

Added Kelly Dolan, 24, at the University of Rhode Island: "The only way we can make politicians pay to attention to people our age is if we turn out in record numbers."

A poll by Harvard University's Institute of Politics last week showed that by a three-to-one margin, young Americans said the country was on the "wrong track."

Forty-six percent favored a total troop withdrawal from Iraq within a year, while a third said troops should be withdrawn after the Iraqis take full control.

Future elections could also be at stake. The "Generation Y" of Americans born from 1977 to 1994 -- shaped by the September 11 attacks, the Iraq war and Hurricane Katrina -- in nine years will make up a third of the electorate.
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Old 11-09-2006, 08:45 AM   #323
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Quote:
Originally posted by A_Wanderer
I love it how it's only democracy when your party wins, this election was just as valid as 2004.
I'm not sure if the democrats who have posted here necessarily believe that. It's democracy if EVERYONE's vote has been counted and the outcome is the reflection of the public opinion of the voters. We're celebrating because we yearn for change, and this brings us hope for the future and the possibilities that lie ahead.
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:16 AM   #324
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Quote:
Originally posted by A_Wanderer
I love it how it's only democracy when your party wins, this election was just as valid as 2004.
The Justice Department has already stated that the claims of fraud were sharply down in this election versus 2004. So there seems to be something different this time around, even if it is something as simple as software and updates for the touch screens and an expectation that they will fail, so now there's a rehearsed backup plan for paper ballots.
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:33 AM   #325
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Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
(Reuters) Young Americans voted in the largest numbers in at least 20 years in congressional elections, energized by the Iraq war and giving a boost to Democrats, pollsters said on Wednesday.
For once I'm not disappointed in my generation's participation!


Quote:

Future elections could also be at stake. The "Generation Y" of Americans born from 1977 to 1994 -- shaped by the September 11 attacks, the Iraq war and Hurricane Katrina -- in nine years will make up a third of the electorate.
Look out world...here we come...
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:40 AM   #326
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Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
(Reuters) Young Americans voted in the largest numbers in at least 20 years in congressional elections, energized by the Iraq war and giving a boost to Democrats, pollsters said on Wednesday.

About 24 percent of Americans under the age of 30, or at least 10 million young voters, cast ballots in Tuesday's elections that saw Democrats make big gains in Congress. That was up 4 percentage points from the last mid-term elections in 2002.

"This looks like the highest in 20 years," said Mark Lopez, research director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, which compiled the data based on exit polls. "Unfortunately, we can't say if it's a record because don't have good comparable data before 1986."

Rock the Vote, a youth-and-civics group, said young voters favored Democrats by a 22-point margin, nearly three times the margin Democrats earned among other age groups and dealing a potentially decisive blow to Republicans in tight races.

"The turnout was awesome," said 21-year-old Katryn Fraher, a political science major at the University of New Mexico who helped build a giant map of local polling stations for her school and was among a group of students walking the campus on Tuesday with a blackboard that counted down the time to vote.

But despite the big turnout, it may not be a record.

In the 1982 mid-term election during the Reagan administration, youth turnout reached 27 percent, but that was among voters aged between 18 to 24 instead of under 30 as measured by Wednesday's exit poll estimates.

Republican pollster Ed Goeas said young voters could have swayed a number of tight races on Tuesday, noting that of 28 seats Democrats picked up from Republicans in the 435-member House of Representatives, 22 were won by less than 2 percent of the vote and 18 were won by just 5,000 votes or less.

"The increase in the youth vote did come into play," he said.

GETTING OUT THE VOTE

As Republicans fought to keep control of Congress, both parties sought to rally young voters who turned out in record numbers in the 2004 presidential election.

At the University of Iowa, some students doubled as "Human Vote Billboards" with messages exhorting students to vote in the battleground state where Democrats won several races.

"It went well," said Brant Miller, 24, at the University of Iowa. "We got a bunch of students to get out there and vote."

Added Kelly Dolan, 24, at the University of Rhode Island: "The only way we can make politicians pay to attention to people our age is if we turn out in record numbers."

A poll by Harvard University's Institute of Politics last week showed that by a three-to-one margin, young Americans said the country was on the "wrong track."

Forty-six percent favored a total troop withdrawal from Iraq within a year, while a third said troops should be withdrawn after the Iraqis take full control.

Future elections could also be at stake. The "Generation Y" of Americans born from 1977 to 1994 -- shaped by the September 11 attacks, the Iraq war and Hurricane Katrina -- in nine years will make up a third of the electorate.
This really warms my heart. Very few of my students voted, even though I was reminding them to even since I applied for my absentee ballot

But I'm glad to see that so many young people let their voice be heard. In my program we read a lot about "The Millenials" (what we call this generation of college students), and that although they are passionate about their causes, they don't participate much in politics. This article really turns that around!!!
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Old 11-09-2006, 10:02 AM   #327
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Old 11-09-2006, 10:13 AM   #328
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Quote:
Originally posted by U2democrat


Trust me I know...following 12 years of GOP control is never going to be easy. Hopefully people will be patient as the Dems get their bearings. They've got to get to know each other, too!
The Dems were put out in 94 the same way the Rep were put out now, because the people were fed up and wanted 'change.' When will the American people ever learn there will be no 'change' with the stagnant two party system? In a year or two everyone will be fed up with the Dems again. The cycle never ends.
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Old 11-09-2006, 10:21 AM   #329
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Your user name makes me hungry. But that's beside the point.


What do you suggest? 3 party system? Multi-party? What makes you think that would be so much better, politics will still be politics, factions will still be factions.
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Old 11-09-2006, 10:25 AM   #330
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When will the American people ever learn there will be no 'change' with the stagnant two party system?
I don't understand what is this change, or rather lackthereof, you are speaking about. Even recent history shows us that whenever a leader is in power, they tend to make policies that conform to their party affiliation, and thus move the country toward that direction. How will this be any different if there was a third party? What is it you are looking for? Maybe I am misinterpreting your post...so hopefully you can clarify for me, but I am kinda confused about it.

And I just want to add that I respect your frustration with both parties, but not voting isn't going to make the Dems & Reps disappear. I don't consider myself a democrat, but I still vote on the issues I care about, and the Dems are a bit closer to my ideals than the Reps are.
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