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Old 02-16-2007, 11:03 PM   #31
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I've been having this same debate with my colleagues, and I guess I shouldn't be surprised to see it here too. I'm just so tired of the "strategy campaigning bullshit" its like people are running to get elected...but not really to bring a real progress or push a specific agenda (except for Dennis ) but do you know what I mean? I've had a long day, so I don't know if it is coherent at all...but I think what I'm trying to say is they are just trying to appeal to the most people...which, duh, is how you win an election...but at the same time some things are being put on the back burner.

i don't know if this came out right.

by the way, i'm leaving myself vulnerable here...but what is QFT?
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Old 02-16-2007, 11:27 PM   #32
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^ That's why I am such a big fan of the Clintons. Sure, they're brilliant strategists, but I also think they are two of the most bipartisan and progressive-minded politicians ever.

They're like U2. They know how to write good songs, but they also know how important it is to get on the radio. If you write great songs, but no one hears them, what's the point? U2 wanted to be big from day one. That's why they've got Paul McGuinness as their brilliant strategist, to get them on the cover of Rolling Stone, to get them on TV, to get the prime-time television specials, etc.

The Clintons are the exact same way. They know that you have to be able to make deals in order to succeed. What's that line of Bono's? "Compromise - it's not a dirty word."
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Old 02-17-2007, 12:44 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally posted by LyricalDrug
^ That's why I am such a big fan of the Clintons. Sure, they're brilliant strategists, but I also think they are two of the most bipartisan and progressive-minded politicians ever.


and I'm really a big Barack Obama fan also..
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Old 02-17-2007, 03:50 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally posted by LyricalDrug
What's that line of Bono's? "Compromise - it's not a dirty word."
I agree, I love the word compromise. But it's the pandering I can't stand.
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Old 02-17-2007, 09:03 AM   #35
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That's democracy for you, better or worse. I agree it sucks, but is there a solution?

Sort of OT but since it's come up in this thread, I hate the censorship politicians. As if the biggest issue facing the country was violent video games and songs with cuss words?
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Old 02-17-2007, 05:10 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chizip
It is a shame that we have a system in place where the politicians, people who put themselves, their career, and electability first have a distinct advantage over true leaders who put their country and their convictions first.
I agree.
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Old 02-17-2007, 08:53 PM   #37
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Originally posted by LyricalDrug
^ That's why I am such a big fan of the Clintons. Sure, they're brilliant strategists, but I also think they are two of the most bipartisan and progressive-minded politicians ever.
Yes, indeed. And I'm also a fan of Barack Obama's.
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Old 02-17-2007, 09:17 PM   #38
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It's true that the Clintons play the political game, however, they're able to get something that benefits the ordinary person while they're playing politics. This game isn't ever going to be a bed of roses. I like them, always have, voted for Clinton twice, will do so again if I have to. I can't imagine them ever manipulating 9/11 the way the Bushies have so shamefully done.
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:35 AM   #39
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Just read this in the newspaper

Campaign against Clinton readied
Conservative and Republican-allied activists have reportedly surfaced with projects aimed at derailing Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton's candidacy before the primaries. A film, book-length exposés, and websites are planned, and a media blitz like the one that helped torpedo the 2004 Democratic presidential nominee, John F. Kerry, may be in the works as well, the Los Angeles Times said.
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:46 AM   #40
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Nader's comments about possibly throwing his hat in the ring if Hillary gets the nomination were interesting. I doubt he'd have the same effect he did in 2000. I think even Nader fans had a little buyers' remorse over that one. That being said, if he wants to run, go ahead.
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Old 02-20-2007, 12:34 AM   #41
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In S.C., Sen. Clinton Targets Black Vote

Campaign Appearances in Early-Primary State Follow Stop by Rival Obama

By Chris Cillizza
washingtonpost.com Staff Writer
Tuesday, February 20, 2007; A04

COLUMBIA, S.C., Feb. 19 -- Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York courted black voters, considered crucial to securing the Democratic presidential nomination, in a series of campaign stops in South Carolina on Monday in which she cast the 2008 election as a chance to make history.

"I believe this presidential campaign is about breaking barriers," Clinton said at a town hall meeting in the state's capital. "This is the campaign, and I am the candidate."

Each of Clinton's appearances was aimed at projecting her as the candidate best equipped to deal with the hopes and hardships of black voters. She called on state leaders to remove the Confederate flag from the grounds of the State House here, as have several other Democratic candidates. Then, after her town hall event at Allen University -- a historically black institution in Columbia -- she headed south to a gathering in Florence in honor of Mayor Frank Willis.

Clinton closed the day in Charleston, speaking at a gala honoring Rep. James E. Clyburn (D-S.C.), who is widely regarded as the most influential black politician in the state. Clinton praised Clyburn -- the third-ranking Democrat in the House -- for his efforts "to find common ground and then stand his ground."

She also noted that the Book of James is one of her favorites in the New Testament -- a religious reference that was greeted with calls of approval and clapping by the overflow crowd packed into a union hall.

Clyburn returned the favor moments later, touting Clinton's "tremendous record of public service and a tremendous campaign that she is running."

Clinton's visit came less than 48 hours after Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) campaigned here, and even during Clinton's speech in Columbia word was circulating that Obama had secured the endorsement of Dick Harpootlian, a former state party chairman.

Obama's attempt to step on Clinton's day in South Carolina underscored the behind-the-scenes back-and-forth between the two top Democratic candidates for the support of black voters, who are expected to make up about half of the electorate in the state's presidential primary Jan. 29.

Clinton scored something of a coup last week by securing the endorsement of state Sen. Darrell Jackson, an influential leader in South Carolina's black community. But the momentum was compromised by allegations that she secured Jackson's support by offering him a lucrative consulting contract.

Jackson, the emcee at the Columbia event, has insisted that several campaigns had made offers to hire his consulting firm. On Monday, Clinton, too, denied any quid pro quo.

These events were far from the minds of the hundreds of people who packed halls across the state to catch a glimpse of Clinton.

Chris Lykes, a black man from Swansea who attended the Columbia meeting, reflected the ambivalence of voters torn between their strong loyalties to Clinton and their attraction to a new face in Obama.

Lykes said that Clinton had "answered all the tough questions" and that he supports the former first lady.

Asked his feelings about Obama, though, Lykes said the senator's being black "matters a whole lot" in his decision, and he acknowledged he had yet to choose between the two candidates.

Although Obama is widely seen as the first black candidate with a serious shot at winning the presidency, national polling shows Clinton with a wide lead among black voters.

In a recent Washington Post-ABC News survey, Clinton led Obama by 60 percent to 20 percent among black voters -- a wider margin than the 41 percent to 17 percent lead she held over the freshman senator among the broader Democratic primary electorate.

Much of Clinton's strong support in the black community is due to the affection that many African Americans hold for her husband, former president Bill Clinton.

Those warm feelings were on display Monday, as the very mention of his name brought a roar from the crowd. "I was always a big fan of your husband," said one man who stood to pose a question in Columbia. "I thought he did a great job."

Asked why she is qualified to lead the nation in a time of peril at home and abroad, Clinton referred to the time she spent by her husband's side in Washington.

"During the eight years of Bill's presidency, I had a front row seat on history [and saw] the difficult decisions any commander in chief has to make," she said. "I learned both what works and what doesn't work."
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Old 02-22-2007, 07:18 PM   #42
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game on, baby!


----

February 22, 2007, 11:30 am
Clinton-Obama: The Morning After

By Kate Phillips

The Clinton-Obama tempest drew a lot of media coverage in the last 24 hours, whipping around the Internet and on television like a brushfire. And Howard Wolfson, a top adviser to Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, continued to fan it with his “we’re-not-gonna-take-it” strategy against criticism of the Clintons, insisting again that Senator Barack Obama should denounce David Geffen’s remarks.

On MSNBC’s “Hardball,” Chris Matthews asked whether any shot against former President Bill Clinton — “the fact that he was impeached, his personal behavior” — would be met with a Clinton campaign charge of “dirty campaigning?” Yes, Mr. Wolfson replied, “bringing up personal behavior — I think that’s below the belt.”

Personal attacks, Mr. Wolfson said, are “unacceptable political discourse.”

Mr. Wolfson even suggested that the Obama campaign might have put Mr. Geffen up to making those remarks in an interview with The Times’s Maureen Dowd, another charge that Mr. Obama denied last night in Iowa. He said Mr. Geffen was entitled to his own opinions and wasn’t speaking for the Illinois Democrat’s campaign.

Pressed by Mr. Matthews as to why the Clinton campaign kept referring to Mr. Geffen as an Obama “finance chair” — which he is not — Mr. Wolfson basically shrugged and said you decide what to call someone who is the host of a million-dollar fund-raising event.

Every campaign has nicknames for their top donors; think of the Bush Rangers and Pioneers. But the Clintons, through two presidential races, two Senate races and now another presidential primary cycle, usually don’t refer to their big fundraisers and bundlers as official campaign finance chairs.

And the campaign seems to be taking on an added risk: Drawing repeated attention to Mr. Geffen’s comments gives Mrs. Clinton’s adversaries more opportunities to revisit the Lincoln bedroom stays by her husband’s top donors.

As for strategy, if this early tempest was a test-the-muscles of the Obama camp, we’re not going to call a winner on this round, (it’s not our place) even if the Clinton campaign is busily touting a Slate piece declaring Mrs. Clinton to have trumped Mr. Obama. And if this flap served to distract from the forum in Carson City, Nev., where Mrs. Clinton’s Iraq vote was questioned again, several of the other Democratic hopefuls signaled their intent to keep that issue alive.

“People know that the Clintons know how to fight back,” Mr. Wolfson told Mr. Matthews.

Yep. We’re in for a long campaign season. It’s only February 2007.
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Old 02-22-2007, 07:23 PM   #43
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If only Rep. Woolsey would run!
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Old 02-22-2007, 08:51 PM   #44
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Re: The Hillary Thread: news, comments, discussion

Quote:
Originally posted by LyricalDrug
She's gonna be the next President of the United States and the most powerful woman in the history of the world.
No way. She already looks bad. Her speeches have primarily been nothing but filler. Even Rolling Stone magazine thinks so. (Not that it determines my political views, but I found it interesting.)
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