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Old 06-01-2003, 09:46 AM   #1
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The G8 Thread :)

So, anyone read any especially good articles? The G8 is going on as we type.

Here's one I found. Hoping these will spark some discussion. I'm hoping the connection between poverty and terrorism, and the "war on poverty" (Thanks Sir Bob!) will get its due.

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June 1, 2003
Chirac to Call for Shift From Battling Terrorism to Helping Poorer Nations
By JOHN TAGLIABUE



ÉVIAN-LES-BAINS, France, May 31 — When President Bush and the other Group of 8 leaders gather to discuss the world's problems on Sunday and Monday, they will no doubt be hoping that this trim spa on the shores of Lake Geneva will be the source of something more than just cold bubbling spring water.

Their host, President Jacques Chirac of France, will press them to turn their attention from terrorism, Iraq and the Middle East to restarting a process of helping less developed regions of the world, most notably Africa.

Mr. Chirac is expected to say that the wealthiest nations must increase their spending for education, health care, water and farming, and that they must help restructure government institutions and encourage free investment in the poorer regions of the world.

To press his case, Mr. Chirac has invited the leaders of 12 developing countries, including nations in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia.

In addition to the United States and France, the Group of 8 is composed of Britain, Canada, Germany, Italy, Japan and Russia. What makes the dynamic of this meeting interesting is that Mr. Bush and the rest of the leaders will be arguing over a broad agenda addressing how to keep the global economy from veering seriously off course, but they will do so under the shadow of differences over Iraq. Among the leaders here aside from Mr. Bush, only Prime Minister Tony Blair of Britain and Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi of Italy backed the war.

Sluggish growth in the markets of the world and the threat of deflation hanging over major economies, like Japan and Germany, are rekindling concern that whatever economic progress seems to be under way may prove to be too fragile to last.

Yet Mr. Chirac summoned the confidence this week to tell reporters that he was "convinced that Évian can send a message of confidence about the growth of the world economy," presumably one of his principal goals for the meeting.

French security forces are taking extraordinary measures around this normally serene lakeside town and around nearby Geneva, just across the lake in Switzerland, to prevent the kind of violent demonstrations that marred the Group of 8 meeting two years ago in the Italian port of Genoa and the Summit of the Americas in Quebec in 2000.

European officials doubt that Mr. Bush's overnight trip to Évian, cut back from two days to one, can help Europe and the United States find common solutions to their problems. "The rest of the world and the United States have varying approaches," said a French official briefing reporters on the meeting.

Differences over Iraq, French officials said, overshadowed even the preparatory discussions for the meeting.

On Monday, Mr. Bush and Mr. Chirac will meet one-on-one, their first such encounter since the war in Iraq. French officials say matters aside from Iraq will fill the agenda.

"One cannot measure the thickness of the handshake and the breadth of the smile" to judge progress, one French official conceded.

A wide assortment of protest groups, including antiglobalization organizations, have assembled on both sides of the French-Swiss border near Évian. They plan two columns of marches from points in both countries on Sunday that will meet at the border in a display of opposition to the perceived evils of globalization, free trade, corporate greed and environmental destruction.

Mr. Chirac was visibly shaken by the violence in Genoa. In recent months, he has met at the Élysée Palace on at least 10 occasions with organizations critical of the Group of 8. The meetings included a marathon four-hour session April 30 with representatives of more than 30 groups, ranging from Greenpeace to a little-known organization called Claaac, the French acronym for the Convergence of Antiauthoritarian and Anticapitalist Struggles.

Critics accuse Mr. Chirac of seeking to buy peace at Évian. French officials emphasized that he wanted what they described as "enlarged dialogue" with private groups from developed countries and the leaders of developing nations.

French officials also say that Mr. Chirac invited the 12 leaders — from Algeria, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Senegal and South Africa — to underscore how prosperity in the industrialized West hinges on the economic success of developing countries. The invitation also reflects the gap between Europe and the Bush administration, which tends to believe that rising tides will lift all boats.

Much of the discussion on Sunday, the first day of the meeting, will focus on growth and international cooperation during a working lunch of the leaders and their developing-world counterparts. Switzerland's president will also attend, acknowledging Swiss help in arranging the Évian meeting. The 12 developing-world leaders are staying in Lausanne, on the Swiss shore facing Évian, and will travel to the meeting by boat.

Noting that Africa's share of global trade had dropped to 1.6 percent by 2000, from 3.3 percent in 1980, while the African share of world investment fell to 1.8 percent, from 4 percent, one French official emphasized that "the African continent runs the risk of marginalization."

Mr. Chirac is eager to restart a commitment made at last year's meeting in the Canadian resort village of Kananaskis for the industrialized world to provide billions of dollars in aid to African nations that reform their economies and governments.

Sunday evening, a progress report on the program, called the New Partnership for Africa's Development, will be given to the Group of 8 by the leaders of Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Senegal and South Africa.

Secretary General Kofi Annan of the United Nations and the directors of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization will attend Sunday's discussions.

On Monday, the Group of 8 leaders will focus on classic topics: the global economy and world security. The agenda will include what Mr. Chirac refers to as "durable development," embracing growth but also struggling against world poverty and disease and providing poorer nations with better access to drugs to combat diseases like AIDS.

Business leaders also hope the leaders will accelerate completion of the latest world trade negotiations, the so-called Doha round. A framework must be agreed on by Sept. 14 for the round to be concluded by January 2005.

Over lunch on Monday, the Group of 8 leaders will tackle several intractable political issues: terrorism, arms proliferation and regional troubles, including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the situations in Iraq and North Korea.

The meeting is to end on Tuesday after a summary session. Mr. Bush will move on to the meatier portion of his trip, a meeting in Jordan with the Israeli and Palestinian prime ministers.

European observers are clearly skeptical that Mr. Chirac's broadening of the agenda and his inclusion of developing-world leaders will galvanize any commitment to their needs, given present trans-Atlantic differences, of which Iraq was a symbol.

Patrick Sabatier, an editorialist for the French leftist daily Libération, wrote this week that Mr. Bush's decision to limit his presence at Évian to one day "underscores that, viewed from Washington, problems of hard power — Iraq, the Middle East, terrorism — are more durable and far more important for the future of the planet than the concerns of soft power — development, the environment, social justice — that the G-8, the opponents of globalization and Chirac place at the top of the planetary agenda."
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Old 06-01-2003, 04:00 PM   #2
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Thank you Sherry, Darling.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlates...739681,00.html

Sunday June 1, 2003 7:29 PM
By CLARE NULLIS
Associated Press Writer

GENEVA (AP) - Thousands of demonstrators poured into the streets Sunday to protest the Group of Eight summit across Lake Geneva in the French town of Evian, some battling with police and looting shops and gas stations.

Anti-riot agents struck back with tear gas, water cannons and rubber pellets, as clashes continued into the evening.

A male demonstrator from London was hospitalized with multiple bone fractures when a police officer cut a rope that held him suspended from a highway overpass and he fell into a river, authorities said. Police were investigating, but said the officer who cut the rope did not know the man was there.

Police reported about another 10 injuries among protesters, none life-threatening. A police officer was also hurt. Authorities searching demonstrator camps for violent youths in black masks arrested at least six people in Lausanne and detained some 400 for identification checks.

In a carnival-like march full of music, demonstrators - who numbered nearly 50,000 according to Swiss police officials and 120,000 according to protest organizers - blocked traffic for hours on bridges and highways in the French and Swiss regions around Geneva.

But they failed in their goal to disrupt the arrival of G-8 leaders and delegations or penetrate the security cordon around the lakeside summit site of Evian.

Protesters started early Sunday, timing their actions to coincide with the arrival of most of the G-8 leaders from the world's top seven industrialized countries and Russia. Most of the leaders landed at Geneva airport and traveled to Evian by helicopter.

The centerpiece was a double march, one beginning in the French town of Annemasse and the other in Geneva. The two marches joined on the Swiss side of the border, then headed together into France.

With pop and rap music thumping, demonstrators in brightly colored clothing waved banners criticizing the G-8, the World Trade Organization and other international bodies.

Some wore oversized masks lampooning G-8 leaders such as President Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair. Rainbow-colored flags with the Italian word for peace - pace - were hung on bridges and handed out by demonstrators.

The protesters support a wide array of concerns, from anti-globalization and environmentalism to forgiveness of Third World debt and fears over genetically modified foods. They accuse the G-8 of profiting on the misery of poorer nations.

During the march, internal ``stewards'' urged protesters not to turn violent and criticized any vandalism. Still, unrest broke out in some areas.

Angry demonstrators erected burning barricades at dawn on a highway leading to Evian, and battled riot police who fired tear gas and water cannon. In Lausanne, some protesters looted a gas station and a supermarket, and in Geneva, youths occupied the city's many bridges.

``We are here to block the G-8. We are not against the people of Lausanne,'' some protesters shouted as they marched near a secured zone where leaders of major developing countries were holding bilateral meetings.

Police in Lausanne said a British man was injured when authorities came to an overpass that demonstrators were blocking. Protesters had strung a rope across the road and hung an anti-G-8 banner. After the protesters dispersed, a policeman cut the rope, concerned that a car might hit it.

The 39-year-old Briton on the rope fell about 60 feet into a shallow stream. Police grabbed the other half of the rope, preventing a woman holding on to the opposite end from falling as well. Hospital officials said the man's life was not in danger.

Later, when the demonstrators headed back to Geneva, several hundred clashed with riot police and smashed windows. In the evening, police rushed a crowd after a few protesters smashed windows downtown. The demonstrators responded with a hail of bottles and rocks, and riot police fired tear gas.

Sunday June 1, 2003 7:59 PM
By DEBORAH SEWARD
Associated Press Writer

EVIAN, France (AP) - The setting was idyllic Sunday for the traditional family photo of G-8 summit leaders and their guests from around the world: a green Alpine meadow with snowcapped peaks in the backdrop.

The leaders themselves put on a good show of good humor despite lingering differences over Iraq.

President Bush laughed with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, and then patted the back of French President Jacques Chirac, this year's Group of Eight summit host and Bush's most ardent anti-war foe.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, who arrived in Evian after successfully hosting world leaders for the 300th anniversary of the founding of St. Petersburg, just beamed - and beamed - before being buttonholed by Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika.

Chirac has done more than any other summit host to broaden the agenda and the guest list beyond the traditionally dark-suited participants of the world's most industrialized nations.

(...)


Water is a central theme at this year's summit - and not just because Evian, the town where the leaders are meeting, is synonymous with the bottled sort.

Water also is being featured as a form of transport and a resource in short supply in parts of the world.

Leaders from developing nations invited to the annual summit of the world's most powerful countries arrived by water - ferried across Lake Geneva on a gloriously sunny day on the classic paddlewheel steamer Montreux, which has been plying the Lemanic waters since 1904.

Water, the resource, also was on the summit agenda.

Chirac says he's keen for G-8 leaders to make good on a pledge to reduce by half the number of people without access to clean water and sanitation by 2015.

"This is a very ambitious goal, particularly in Africa,'' Chirac said before the summit.

(...)

~~~~~~~~~~~

What about the privatization of water?
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Old 06-02-2003, 02:38 PM   #3
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G-8 Summit Leaders Turn to Global Economy
23 minutes ago

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER, AP Economics Writer

EVIAN, France - World leaders projected confidence on Monday that they will turn around their weak economies and pledged cooperation on global issues from terrorism to the rebuilding of Iraq (news - web sites).


AP Photo


AP Photo
Slideshow: G-8 Summit

Protesters Loot Shops As G8 Begins
(Reuters Video)



President Bush (news - web sites) and the other leaders were determined to present a united front as a way to begin healing the bitter divisions exposed by the Iraq war.


Even Bush and his biggest European foe on Iraq, French President Jacques Chirac, had warm words of praise for each other. Bush declared that "a united Europe working with America can do a lot of good.


In contrast to the harmony inside the meetings, riot police waged pitched battles into Monday's early hours with thousands of protesters intent on destruction and looting in nearby Geneva. However, with the resumption of the work week later Monday, Geneva, Lausanne and the French town of Annemasse, the main flashpoints of the weekend demonstrations, were quiet.


Bush and the other leaders, meeting at a posh Alpine resort on Lake Geneva far away from the demonstrations, said they saw hopeful signs that current economic troubles in the United States, Europe and Japan would be banished soon by stronger economic growth.


The leaders issued joint statements Monday, pledging greater coordination to bolster the flagging economy, fight global terrorism and halt the spread of nuclear, chemical and other weapons of mass destruction. As part of the effort on terrorism, the leaders issued a joint action plan to keep shoulder-fired-missiles out of the hands of terrorists.


Chirac called the discussions on the global economy "very positive" and said the leaders expressed a "message of confidence" that their countries could achieve higher growth rates.


Speaking at a late afternoon news conference, Chirac said he was impressed by the depth of knowledge all of the leaders exhibited in their discussions on the economy.


"I was struck by the fact that everybody spoke without any notes," Chirac said.


British Prime Minister Tony Blair (news - web sites) said economic reform efforts by European countries such as France and Germany were on the agenda.


"There is a general recognition that if we don't change and reform our economies quickly we are not going to be able to survive with the same living standards in the modern world," Blair said.


All leaders at the annual Group of Eight summit — composed of the world's seven wealthiest nations and Russia — asserted they were putting divisions over Iraq behind them.


Bush, with a smiling Chirac sitting next to him, praised the French president as a "man who knows a lot about the Middle East" and said he wanted to seek his advice before heading to the region for talks with the leaders of Israel and various Arab countries.


Bush left the summit a day early for a round of talks aimed at getting stalled peace talks back on track.


A senior U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said that in their private meeting Bush told Chirac, "The Iraq situation was difficult but it is time to move on."


Chirac's spokeswoman Catherine Colonna told reporters that the French and U.S. presidents sought in their private discussions to ensure "that French-U.S. ties are not a prisoner to the past. ... The question now is to see how peace can succeed in Iraq."


Bernd Mueztelburg, foreign policy adviser to German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, said the talks among the leaders over Iraq demonstrated "a common will not just to look ahead, but also to politically stabilize the country and rebuild the economy."





None of the G-8 nations made new offers at the Evian summit to support the rebuilding effort financially. The United States is planning to hold a pledging conference among rich nations later this year.

While four of the G-8 countries — France, Germany, Russia and Canada — opposed the Iraq war, Chirac said that there was common agreement now that the new United Nation's Security Council resolution would serve as the basis for rebuilding Iraq.

The Bush administration won a victory when those countries dropped their opposition to giving the United States and Britain a broad mandate in a U.N. resolution, overwhelmingly approved last month, to rebuild Iraq with only minimal U.N. input.

Chirac called the new resolution a "solid base" for going forward with Iraq reconstruction.

The opening day of the G-8 summit Sunday had been devoted to discussions among a much larger group of 11 of the world's major developing countries including China, Brazil, India, Mexico and Malaysia joining a number of African nations.

The African countries won commitments from the United States and Europe to greatly increase the money they will provide to fight AIDS (news - web sites) in poor countries with European countries saying they would match America's tripling of resources contained in a new $15 billion, five-year AIDS law Congress passed at Bush's urging.

Schroeder was the last leader to arrive, missing most of the first day to stay in Berlin and win passage at an emergency party conference of a far-reaching economic reform package that he hopes will revive Germany's sagging economy.

The leaders, hailing his victory on the package, gave Schroeder a round of applause and backslaps when he arrived late to Sunday night's dinner.

The summit will end on Tuesday with the reading of a chairman's statement by Chirac and a round of news conference by the other leaders.
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Old 06-02-2003, 02:54 PM   #4
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so i'm still trying to figure out the whole protest thing at the G8's... so what exactly are these guys protesting... everything?
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Old 06-02-2003, 10:32 PM   #5
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Depends on the group, Headache. Some are communist/anti-capitalists. Some of the more extreme ones are anarchists. They're protesting/challenging capitalism or government in gerneral. Some are protesting globalization and the poverty it has created, or its effects on the environment.



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Old 06-03-2003, 05:45 AM   #6
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I have a few friends over in Evian. One of them called me last night and was angry to hear that all we've seen on tv of the protests is the extremists causing violence and fighting with the police. The violent idiots are not representative of everyone who's protesting there - they're just the ones who get on tv, while the people who hold peaceful demonstrations and public meetings are ignored.

The people I know have gone there to protest at how little the G8 has been doing to help poorer countries - it's a meeting of the seven wealthiest countries in the world and they could be doing so much more. I also know of one person who's gone over there with an environmentalist group, I'm not sure exactly what their specific concern is this year though.

*Fizz.
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Old 06-03-2003, 09:24 AM   #7
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so baisicly yeah... as a whole, they're protesting everything. ok, thanks for clearing that up
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Old 06-03-2003, 09:48 AM   #8
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Quote:
I have a few friends over in Evian. One of them called me last night and was angry to hear that all we've seen on tv of the protests is the extremists causing violence and fighting with the police. The violent idiots are not representative of everyone who's protesting there - they're just the ones who get on tv, while the people who hold peaceful demonstrations and public meetings are ignored.
But isn't that always the case. I guess it makes good news, or I guess I should say exciting news.
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Old 06-03-2003, 11:57 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by FizzingWhizzbees
I have a few friends over in Evian. One of them called me last night and was angry to hear that all we've seen on tv of the protests is the extremists causing violence and fighting with the police. The violent idiots are not representative of everyone who's protesting there - they're just the ones who get on tv, while the people who hold peaceful demonstrations and public meetings are ignored.

The people I know have gone there to protest at how little the G8 has been doing to help poorer countries - it's a meeting of the seven wealthiest countries in the world and they could be doing so much more. I also know of one person who's gone over there with an environmentalist group, I'm not sure exactly what their specific concern is this year though.

*Fizz.

The extremist minority sells more newspapers. It's about like reporting on the anti-war protests in the U.S. earlier this year and only writing about the flag-burners. Most of us did not burn flags or cause problems.
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Old 06-03-2003, 02:51 PM   #10
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I agree with you both, BonoVoxSuperstar and verte. I find it really frustrating as someone who was involved in the anti-war movement in a PEACEFUL way, that the actions of myself and groups I worked with were ignored by the media, in favour of focusing on a small group of extremists.

I went on a demonstration in my hometown where over 1000 university and school students protested peacefully by marching through the streets, carrying banners and chanting slogans to express our opposition to war. Meanwhile, a group of five or six anarchists thought it would be a good idea to throw a brick through the window of a local radio station. Guess which got on tv.

Of course it's not only the media I get frustrated with about this - it's also those little groups of extremists who ruin things for everyone else. They don't seem to realise that when your average person sees some idiot throwing a brick through the window of McDonalds, they're not likely to be sympathetic to your cause. According to them, what matters is getting on tv at all - they think peaceful protests don't get on tv so they resort to violence, apparently failing to understand that while violence does get on tv, it does a lot more harm than good to their cause.

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Old 06-04-2003, 04:11 PM   #11
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Many are protesting against neoliberalism too. Many protest to show that some people know about the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and are against that way of playing politics.

The few violent people who take part, are totally unimportant in regards to the cruel changes the politicians push through at their conferences. I think that f.e. the privatization of water is not a great idea. After all, I don´t want private corporations to regulate the most important resource for living on this planet.

Violence always has two sides: the police is violent in its actions as well. Two years ago a protestor was killed, this year many were hurt. Still, I am proud of the people who started the anti-globalization movement in Seattle.

Not only leftist freaks, but also economists and nobel prize winners share my views, for example is Joseph Stiglitz, who describes neo-liberal policies in his book "Globalization and its Discontents".
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Old 06-04-2003, 04:43 PM   #12
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I agree with you, hiphop - about the police violence. I've been on several demos where the police used absolutely disproportionate force against protestors. On one demo one of my friends got hit on the had by a police baton for no reason, I've seen children as young as twelve or thirteen years old being pushed around by the police. I've repeatedly seen the police target a black friend of mine, and try to provoke him into using bad language in front of the police so they can arrest him. One time I got grabbed by two police officers and thrown on the front of a police van all because I was running across the road to help a friend and the police assumed I was going to cause trouble. (Just to put that in perspective: I'm 5'5" and about 110lbs - apparently in order to stop me from "causing trouble" it requires two police officers to grab hold of me and the only way they can restrain me is to hold my arms behind my back and push me face down against a police van. Hmmm.)

There are lots of occassions when demonstrations start out entirely peacefully but the police are so heavy-handed that they provoke a response from the protesters. The police are far too quick to resort to using tear gas etc, which only serves to make the situation increasingly tense and make violence more likely.
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Old 06-04-2003, 06:39 PM   #13
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Damn, Fizz! Those sound like mean cops! I was in one demonstration against the war here and some idiot drove right into the demonstration and hit three demonstrators. It was ugly. The cops busted the . I'm telling you some people really didn't like it that we were protesting. Disgusting.
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Old 06-04-2003, 06:56 PM   #14
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Originally posted by whenhiphopdrovethebigcars
The few violent people who take part, are totally unimportant in regards to the cruel changes the politicians push through at their conferences. I think that f.e. the privatization of water is not a great idea. After all, I don´t want private corporations to regulate the most important resource for living on this planet.
I think this sucks, too. What a horrible idea.
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