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Old 04-28-2003, 12:20 PM   #16
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Originally posted by FizzingWhizzbees


I obviously can't read the authors mind, but I would think it could mean:
-Conservatives might be opposed to sex education that includes teaching students about using contraception and therefore protecting themselves against AIDS/HIV.
-Some conservatives might be of the opinion that there is something shameful about a person having AIDS/HIV and so people with those illnesses might feel uanble to get treatment because of the way they fear people will respond to them.

Just some ideas.

Fizz, that could be true of some people in these parts. There are people with screwy attitudes all over. After all we still have the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis, and skinheads. I think the objection was to the assumption that all Southerners, or all conservative Southerners, think this way. Obviously we all don't but maybe too many do. Just my purple tuppence's worth.
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Old 04-28-2003, 02:52 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by FizzingWhizzbees


I obviously can't read the authors mind, but I would think it could mean:
-Conservatives might be opposed to sex education that includes teaching students about using contraception and therefore protecting themselves against AIDS/HIV.
-Some conservatives might be of the opinion that there is something shameful about a person having AIDS/HIV and so people with those illnesses might feel uanble to get treatment because of the way they fear people will respond to them.

Just some ideas.
I think its also the conservative idea of just not talking about sex. If you don't talk about it, you don't know how serious the problem is and you don't educate yourself on how to prevent it, which brings me to another topic -- how educated are people in the South? what is the high school graduation rate? alot of what I learned about safe sex I learned in high school.

you have to factor in the culture for this. In San Fran and NYC, I'm sure people are more educated about safe sex and those who can be infected simply because the issue has been so prevelant in those cultures -- due to a larger gay population [where the disease was most prevelant early on] and due to the openness of the culture [where more people are likely to interact on a sexual basis]..... [i hope that doesn't sound stereotypical, sorry if it does].
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Old 04-29-2003, 10:11 PM   #18
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I don't know if it's a matter of "how educated people are in the South" as much as it is what we are educated in. You can have a Ph.D. in the classics or whatever and not know anything about sexually transmitted disease. The whole sex deal is complex. In fighting AIDS in a heavily Moslem country, Ethiopia, the campaigners don't even use the word "sex"; they use the term "reproductive health" instead. You can understand sexually transmitted disease without diplomas or degrees. You can't unless you're willing to talk about it.
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Old 04-29-2003, 10:59 PM   #19
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Maybe so sharky, however, San Francisco is so much more "completely" diverse from a significant portion of the US, not to mention the South, one can't really make a compairison. I think the fight aganist Aids began in SF, which was a good thing, when it became so rampant that it was finally reconized as a world wide health threat. With that in mind I hope all will follow the advice of the other forums here, and contact their representatives.
To call your Representative and Senators, dial the Senate switchboard at (202) 224-3121, and ask for them by name.
To find out who your representative is, go to http://www.datadata.org/what.htm?1051549720340 and click on “Find Your Representative
If you are interested> The following speach was given today by the President.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/relea...0030429-5.html
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Old 04-30-2003, 12:42 PM   #20
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You're right. I've never been to San Francisco, but I have two sisters who live in Brooklyn. The whole culture there is so different. They have so much diversity in their population. By contrast there are only two major ethnic groups in the South--the "whites", mainly of Scotch-Irish descent, and the African Americans. The groups of Italians, Poles, etc, etc, are very small, less than 1 % of the population. Thus you don't have the diversity of ideas that you do in big shot places like New York. It's just a different place with different people.
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Old 05-03-2003, 03:23 AM   #21
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www.cdc.gov

It isn't just the south and it is not selective to nationality/race. I know someone that simply was in a relationship with someone she loved that was a HIV carrier and has now converted.


I only have one thought on the subject that comes to mind right now.

Years ago when I asked my grandmother how I would know if I loved someone enough to share the rest of my life with them.
She answered simply,"You will know when you are sure that they are the only person you can see yourself spending the rest of your life with and you love them so much you would die for them."

That was pre-AIDS. I think it says it all.


Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Description

AIDS is a serious disease, first recognized as a distinct syndrome in 1981. This syndrome represents the late clinical state of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), resulting in progressive damage to the immune system and in life-threatening infectious and noninfectious complications.

Occurrence

AIDS and HIV infection occur worldwide. Comprehensive surveillance systems are lacking in many countries, so the true number of cases is likely to be far greater than the numbers officially reported, particularly from developing nations. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimates that 34.3 million people are HIV-infected worldwide. Because HIV infection and AIDS are globally distributed, the risk to international travelers is determined less by their geographic destination than by their sexual and drug-using behaviors.

Risk for Travelers

The risk of HIV infection for international travelers is generally low. Factors to consider when assessing risk include the extent of direct contact with blood or secretions and of sexual contact with potentially infected people. In addition, the blood supply in developing countries might not be adequately screened.

Preventive Measures

No vaccine is available to prevent infection with HIV. For information on the safety of vaccines for HIV-infected people, see Vaccine Recommendations for Travelers With Altered Immunocompetence, Including HIV.

Travelers should be advised that HIV infection is preventable. HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse and needle- or syringe-sharing; by medical use of blood, blood components, or organ or tissue transplantation; and perinatally from an infected woman to her infant. HIV is not transmitted through casual contact; air, food, or water routes; contact with inanimate objects; or mosquitoes or other arthropod vectors. The use of any public conveyance (for example, an airplane, an automobile, a boat, a bus, or a train) by people with AIDS or HIV infection does not pose a risk of infection for the crew members or other travelers.

Travelers should be advised that they are at risk if they:

Have sexual intercourse (heterosexual or homosexual) with an infected person.
Use or allow the use of contaminated, unsterilized syringes or needles for any injections or other skin-piercing procedures, including acupuncture, use of illicit drugs, steroid or vitamin injections, medical or dental procedures, ear or body piercing, or tattooing.
Use infected blood, blood components, or clotting factor concentrates. HIV infection by this route is rare in those countries or cities where donated blood and plasma are screened for HIV antibody.
Travelers should be advised to avoid sexual encounters with people who are infected with HIV or whose HIV infection status is unknown. This includes avoiding sexual activity with intravenous drug users and people with multiple sexual partners, such as male or female sex workers. Condoms, when used consistently and correctly, prevent transmission of HIV. Travelers who engage in vaginal, anal, or oral-genital intercourse with anyone who is infected with HIV or whose infection status is unknown should use a latex condom. For those who are sensitive to latex, polyurethane or other plastic condoms are available. (Travelers should be advised to look for the words "for the prevention of disease" on the condom packaging.)

In many countries, needle sharing by intravenous drug users is a major source of HIV transmission and other infections, such as hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV). Travelers should be advised not to use drugs intravenously or share needles for any purpose.

In the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, and western European countries, the risk of transfusion-associated HIV infection has been virtually eliminated through required testing of all donated blood for antibody to HIV. In the United States, donations of blood and plasma must be screened for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies and HIV-1 p24 antigen.

If produced in the United States according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved procedures, immune globulin preparations (such as those used for the prevention of hepatitis A (HAV) and HBV) and HBV vaccines undergo processes that are known to inactivate HIV; therefore, these products should be used as indicated. Less developed nations might not have a formal program for testing blood or biological products for antibody to HIV. In those countries, travelers should (when medically prudent) avoid use of unscreened blood-clotting factor concentrates or those of uncertain purity. If transfusion is necessary, the blood should be tested, if at all possible, for HIV antibody by appropriately trained laboratory technicians using a reliable test. (See WHO Blood Transfusion Guidelines for International Travelers for additional information.)

Needles used to draw blood or administer injections should be sterile, preferably single use and disposable, and prepackaged in a sealed container. Travelers with insulin-dependent diabetes or hemophilia, or who require routine or frequent injections should be advised to carry a supply of syringes, needles, and disinfectant swabs (for example, alcohol wipes) sufficient to last their entire stay abroad.

International travelers should be advised that some countries serologically screen incoming travelers (primarily those planning extended visits, such as for work or study) and deny entry to people with AIDS and those whose test results indicate infection with HIV. People intending to visit a country for a substantial period or to work or study abroad should be informed of the policies and requirements of the particular country. This information is usually available from the consular officials of the individual nations. An unofficial list that has been compiled by the U.S. Department of State can be found at the following Internet address: http://travel.state.gov///HIVtestingreqs.html.

Further information is available from 1-800-342-AIDS, toll free from the United States or its territories (for Spanish-speaking callers, 1-800-344-SIDA, or for hearing-impaired callers with teletype equipment, 1-800-AIDS-TTY).
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