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Old 05-12-2006, 07:57 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally posted by martha
What the hell is the "bottom of the education scale" Are you talking pay? Because that means you're comfortable with these people teaching. Which is what folks like you are always whining about: crappy teachers. Are you talking training? What do you mean?
"Bottom of the education scale" means starting as a freshman in college and taking the current amount of education required to become a teacher.

My idea was more geared towards those who already have a B.A./M.A. in something else. There are not many people who have the money to go back and start fresh with their education, and in most career switches, you don't have to either.

Quote:
As long as people think teaching is easy, like you seem to think, and can be done with a minimum of training, teachers will be insulted by this kind of thinking. Once again, if you had a choice, would you like a surgeon who went through a "flexible" program to cut you open? Or would you rather have a fully trained surgeon?
I think we're comparing apples and oranges here (and, for the record, while they're different, I love apples and oranges equally); but if we're going to use the "surgeon" analogy, if we accepted such high rates of failure in surgery as we do in education, we'd have quite a high rate of mortality. And while heads would roll if we had incompetant surgeons, we just seem to do nothing when it comes to incompetant teachers, incompetant administration officials, or completely asinine school board officials.

It isn't money. I went to Catholic schools where the teachers were paid much less than their public school counterparts and school buildings that were less impressive, so why is it that Catholic schools do better on average than public schools? And you can't tell me that it's all because they're much more "choosy" with their students. They have their problem students and the high school I went to had remedial courses in nearly everything.

ALL I'm saying is that our system is broken. I'm not sure exactly what the culprit is, but the blame can be placed on nearly every level of our society, from parents on up to the U.S. Congress and the President.

Unfortunately, it just seems like what I'm saying here really doesn't matter anyway. I almost think we have a system so completely broken that it's beyond repair, and our society seems incapable of thinking of longer-term projects. After all, people bitched and moaned over the 15 year projection for the "Big Dig" in Boston, while it was noted that Asian countries would have thought nothing of such a time span. And when it comes to things like nuclear power or fuel-cells, saying that something will take "20 years" is synonymous with "too long to be feasible."

But whatever. Let's keep those tax cuts up!

Melon
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Old 05-12-2006, 09:30 AM   #17
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in england if u been in teaching for more than like 20 years u get big bucks, its like $70,000.

My maths teacher retired at 55 and this is not a private school.
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Old 05-12-2006, 04:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by melon

It isn't money. I went to Catholic schools where the teachers were paid much less than their public school counterparts and school buildings that were less impressive, so why is it that Catholic schools do better on average than public schools? And you can't tell me that it's all because they're much more "choosy" with their students. They have their problem students and the high school I went to had remedial courses in nearly everything.


Melon
Re: Catholic schools. First, students are screened with entrance exams. Right there they are more "choosy." Second, while Catholic schools may offer "remedial" classes that doesn't equate to a special education program. In fact, a parent of a SPED child would be foolish to send them to a private school. The Catholic schools in my area don't take many SPED kids. They don't have to.

NCLB testing allows 1% of the testing class not to be tested. These are usually the Alpha kids and the TMH kids. Everyone else takes the test. Schools with large special education populations, such as mine, often must test TMH students. So, when we're talking about test scores, let's not forget about the special education population.
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