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Old 06-03-2005, 06:15 AM   #16
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Saudi Arabia is one big Wahhabist hellhole. Just ask any woman who lives there. Recently they actually had some elections but women weren't allowed to vote. You do wonder why we're allies with such a repressive country. Can you say "oil"?
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Old 06-03-2005, 04:06 PM   #17
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There are times when one would like to hang the whole human race and finish the farce. --Mark Twain




Teta040 says:

"I don't have the book in front of me, but I remeber this stuff very well. I urge you to pick up a copy and read it. Oh..amd it has a blurb from Bono on the back cover."


Doesn't every book have a blurb from Bono on the back cover?

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Old 06-03-2005, 04:25 PM   #18
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Originally posted by verte76
Saudi Arabia is one big Wahhabist hellhole. Just ask any woman who lives there. Recently they actually had some elections but women weren't allowed to vote. You do wonder why we're allies with such a repressive country. Can you say "oil"?
Oil!

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Old 06-03-2005, 05:31 PM   #19
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Saudi Religious Police Arrest 8 Christians
Only 8?

What a bunch of slackers.


They should offer bounties.

This has been very successful in filling up GITMO.
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Old 06-03-2005, 06:37 PM   #20
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Oil!

Additionally, who can repeat the central principle of our current society\government?--MONEY TALKS!
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Old 06-03-2005, 08:58 PM   #21
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Saudis Rebuked on Forced Labor
U.S. Critical of 4 Gulf Allies in Report on Trafficking of Humans

By Glenn Kessler
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, June 4, 2005; Page A10

The United States yesterday named Saudi Arabia and three other Persian Gulf Arab allies as having among the world's worst records in halting human trafficking, a rebuke that could subject the countries to sanctions if they do not act quickly to address U.S. concerns.

The finding, in an annual report issued by the State Department, places Kuwait, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia in the same category as such countries as Cuba, Burma, North Korea and Sudan. Human rights activists said the inclusion of such close allies in the war on terrorism suggests that the administration is beginning to eliminate from its human rights policy what some have dubbed the "Middle East exception."

Last year, the State Department also faulted Saudi Arabia for the first time for its lack of religious tolerance.

The report said as many as 800,000 people, many of them women and children, are trafficked across international borders as sex workers and forced laborers in a modern-day slave trade. This is the fifth annual report, which was mandated by an act of Congress at the instigation of an unusual coalition of feminists and Christian evangelical groups. President Bush frequently denounced sexual slavery to motivate his evangelical base during the 2004 campaign.

In the report, the Gulf Arab states were cited primarily for practices that allowed the abuse of domestic servants and laborers who came to the Middle East primarily from Asia.

The report said the Saudis, for example, lack laws criminalizing most trafficking offenses, and there is little evidence of whether employers are ever prosecuted. Many of the foreign laborers in Saudi Arabia work as domestic servants, and they are not covered by Saudi labor laws.

In Saudi Arabia, "we have domestic workers being brought in from many countries into domestic servitude, child beggars, a lot of beatings, reports of beatings, and rape -- very difficult to get shelter, no convictions," said John R. Miller, the senior adviser for human trafficking.

"Trafficking in human beings is nothing less than a modern form of slavery," Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said. "The United States has a particular duty to fight this scourge because trafficking in persons is an affront to the principles of human dignity and liberty upon which this nation was founded."

Rice has made promotion of democracy and freedom a central tenet at the State Department. A senior department official said she was involved in the decision making on where to rank individual countries and had directed analysts to make recommendations based on the criteria laid out in the law establishing the report.

Tom Malinowski, Washington advocacy director for Human Rights Watch, said the inclusion of the Gulf states in this year's report was significant: "It is another positive sign that the administration is willing to be honest and straightforward about the shortcomings of its allies in the Arab world, including Saudi Arabia."

Other countries listed as poor performers in stopping trafficking include Bolivia, Cambodia, Ecuador, Jamaica, Togo and Venezuela. An additional 27 countries, including China, India and South Africa, were placed on a watch list, meaning they have significant problems but the governments appear to be making an effort to combat them.

Countries that are listed as poor performers can lose non-humanitarian, non-trade-related assistance from the United States, or be deemed ineligible to take part in cultural and educational exchange programs. But countries can avoid sanctions if they begin to take actions to address U.S. concerns in the next few months.

Two years ago, Turkey and Greece, two NATO allies, fell into the bottom category, but they have since improved their standing. Equatorial Guinea and Venezuela have been sanctioned since the reports began.

"The purpose of the law is not to sanction," Miller said. "It is to get progress in freeing the victims and throwing the traffickers in jail."
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It is a start, decades of US support for the "Magic Kingdom" and the oil that flowed from that is certainly a hard thing to break.
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Old 06-03-2005, 09:11 PM   #22
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Originally posted by A_Wanderer
It is a start, decades of US support for the "Magic Kingdom" and the oil that flowed from that is certainly a hard thing to break.
This is the equivalent of sending Saudi Arabia to the "time out chair." In other words, a token gesture with no teeth.

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Old 06-04-2005, 09:44 AM   #23
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Originally posted by deep


Only 8?

What a bunch of slackers.


They should offer bounties.

This has been very successful in filling up GITMO.
Nice comparison. I guess you see no difference between militant and missionary.
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Old 06-04-2005, 10:07 AM   #24
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Originally posted by nbcrusader
Nice comparison. I guess you see no difference between militant and missionary.
Well, anthropologically speaking, missionaries have mostly served to spread homophobia worldwide, particularly to cultures that once thought it was perfectly normal and natural for millennia.

I have no love for Christian missionaries and I have no love for Saudi Arabia.

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Old 06-04-2005, 11:51 AM   #25
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Originally posted by nbcrusader


Nice comparison. I guess you see no difference between militant and missionary.
My thoughts exactly.
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Old 06-04-2005, 11:54 AM   #26
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Originally posted by melon


Well, anthropologically speaking, missionaries have mostly served to spread homophobia worldwide, particularly to cultures that once thought it was perfectly normal and natural for millennia.
Melon
That's what they've "mostly served to do" - to spead homophobia? Funny, I thought that what they've "mostly served to do" is feed people, help them build house, helped them irrigate, grow crops, and preach the Gospel.

You've gone far beyond the realm of reality on this one, melon.
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Old 06-04-2005, 12:17 PM   #27
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Originally posted by 80sU2isBest
That's what they've "mostly served to do" - to spead homophobia? Funny, I thought that what they've "mostly served to do" is feed people, help them build house, helped them irrigate, grow crops, and preach the Gospel.

You've gone far beyond the realm of reality on this one, melon.
"Preach the Gospel." And whose interpretation of the Gospel is that? That's where the homophobia is spreading, and nations where same-sex acts were once highly common, like Papua New Guinea, it's now "illegal." The same goes for Fiji, and there's an Australian in prison right now for having consentual sex with a non-minor Fijian in his 20s.

All because some fucking Westerners had to spread their hate on a global level, and honey coat it with social services that their governments are too ineffectual to provide. Does that remind of you something? That's right: that's how Hamas works in the Middle East, and, as a result of their social services, Hamas is held in a very high regard in the Middle East. They certainly don't see it as a "terrorist group," as Western nations have labelled it.

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Old 06-04-2005, 01:42 PM   #28
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Yup, hatred makes you blind.....
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