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Old 06-19-2007, 01:36 PM   #16
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Re: Salman Rushdie Knighted, Islamic World Outraged

Quote:
Originally posted by Pearl


Was it a good idea to knight him? Or has Britain put itself into a deep hole?
Seems like a pretty bad idea actually. Regardless of your stance on Rushdie, knighting him is sort of asking for trouble.


And the editor of the Middle East Economic Survey's name is Gerald Butt? Butt??? A pity his parents liked Gerald better than Harold though
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Old 06-19-2007, 01:58 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by Judah
There are political extremists in Pakistan (and other Islamic countries) who love to manipulate the electorate into West bashing. It's easier to get support by getting people riled up over what the "immoral West" does, than to provide the basics in life: food, shelter, education, equality.




you mean Pakistan has Republicans, too?
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Old 06-19-2007, 02:36 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axver


1. After the fatwa was originally issued against Rushdie, he went into hiding for years. At one ZooTV gig at Wembley Stadium, MacPhisto phoned Rushdie, but as it turned out, Rushdie was backstage and he came out to join MacPhisto. It was his first public appearance since the fatwa.
.
I was there that night. It was a big surprise when Rushdie walked out as he hadn't been seen in public for months.

I can't understand though why Rushdie was awarded a knighthood rather than a lesser award such as an OBE or CBE which most writers end up with at best. I don't think his contribution to British literature has been that outstanding. Midnight Children was a great book but reading Satanic Verses was a waste of time. I don't know if Rushdie supports the Labour Party but it's food for thought that those people who donate large sums often end up with top honours.
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Old 06-19-2007, 05:14 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by unico


I heard a bit about this on Democracy Now. Either they read this thread, or they just rock hardcore, because they explicitly said that this has angered people in Iran and Pakistan. They didn't make generalized statements about it.
Democracy Now just rocks hardcore.
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Old 06-19-2007, 05:15 PM   #20
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Originally posted by martha
They can just get the fuck over it.
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Old 06-19-2007, 05:27 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally posted by Irvine511






you mean Pakistan has Republicans, too?
I was going to say the same thing!
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Old 06-19-2007, 05:28 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally posted by Greenlight


I was there that night. It was a big surprise when Rushdie walked out as he hadn't been seen in public for months.

I can't understand though why Rushdie was awarded a knighthood rather than a lesser award such as an OBE or CBE which most writers end up with at best. I don't think his contribution to British literature has been that outstanding. Midnight Children was a great book but reading Satanic Verses was a waste of time. I don't know if Rushdie supports the Labour Party but it's food for thought that those people who donate large sums often end up with top honours.
How much you wanna bet he wouldn't have been knighted if it hadn't been for the fatwa?
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Old 06-19-2007, 06:04 PM   #23
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This is the vindication of FYM, as far as I'm concerned.

We see behind the cheap propaganda, we're not easily led.

It's a good day for the forum.
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:42 PM   #24
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From an interview with David Cronenberg in SHIFT magazine, June/July '95:
Quote:
[Cronenberg:] I've had movies censored, and I realize that I could never second-guess a censor. I don't know how they think because they'll want to cut something out of my movie that I would never imagine they would.

[Rushdie:] I had the strange experience of becoming a subject of a movie--this appalling movie made in Pakistan called International Guerrillas. It's about the freedom fighters of Islam searching for me, trying to kill me. I'm the villain of the movie. There is a character called my name who is the author of The Satanic Verses who wears a series of appalling safari suits. And every time this guy arrives on camera there's a sort of satanic "dahh dahh." And the cameraman always looks to his feet. And there's a slow "pan" up...And this guy, me, lives in what appears to be an island in the Philippines, protected by what appears to be the Israeli army. And various members of these Islamic radicals were arrested by these Jewish soldiers and are brought to the "me" character who tortures them, has them tied up and cut about with swords. And at the end of the film I actually get killed by the Holy Book itself. The Koran appears in the sky above me and fries me with lightning. This dreadful film is so badly made that it's actually difficult to take it too seriously, but it came to England and was banned. And I found myself in the strangest position. I'm fighting an anti-censorship fight and here's somebody banning a film which is brought about by me. It ended up with me writing to the censors here, guaranteeing that I would not take legal action against them. And telling them that I do not wish to be protected in this way. It's a wonderful parable about how censorship doesn't work. If that film had been banned, it would have become the hottest video in town. Everybody would have seen it. Instead, it was unbanned at my request and the producers booked the biggest cinema in Bradford, which is the largest Muslim community, and nobody came. They lost a fortune, and the film just died overnight.
....................................................................
You say you can you never go back to Bombay?

No. It's completely dreadful for me. That is the worst thing, finding it difficult to go to India is, of all the deprivations, the worst. Because, well, because I'm from there. My family is still there and my mother lives in Pakistan and I'm not allowed to go to Pakistan. I'm personally banned there...I will never go to Pakistan again, no question. But it's an indication of how trumped up this whole thing is. My mother has been living there throughout this time and there's been absolutely no trouble. You know, she hasn't had a rude phone call.

Why not? Because you believe that in the streets--

Because all of the people are not like that. She goes to the bazaar and people say, "How is your son? Isn't it dreadful what's happening?"

Oh? Now that's so interesting to hear.

But that's the reality.

The image you have of it is that she would be stoned in the streets.

I know. People say, "These crazy Muslims, we couldn't stop them, and they're bastards." One of the things that's not given a lot of attention is how much Muslim support for me there's been.

Well, that's encouraging to hear.

The thing called Islamism is not the same thing as Islam. This political thing which we call fundamentalism, everybody is scared stiff of it. It is not a religious movement, it's a political fascist movement which happens to be using a certain kind of religious language.

It's like the Christian fundamentalists in the States.

Sure, but because there is less knowledge in the West of what's happening in these countries, there's a tendency not to understand that this is a political movement, a tendency to say that it is a spontaneous outpouring of the true religious feelings of the people.

Yes, I know that people do think that.

Yes, and also to not notice the fact that the people who are most oppressed by these movements are Muslims. That's to say the people most oppressed by the Iranian regime are the people of Iran.

Ultimately it's easy to think that they also got what they deserved, that somehow this is an expression of what they really want.

But there's no such thing as a homogeneous culture which can demand not to be criticized. Iran, for example, is famous as the place in which the most pornographic jokes about the prophet are made.

Really?

Iran is famous as being a place with dirty stories, dirty religious stories. It's their culture. No culture is one thing.

If someone were doing that now in Iran, under these--

Oh, it would get wiped out.

Now they would.

But it's still in the streets and in people's houses et cetera. It's an irreverent culture. My writing has always come out of that idea of the mixture, the kind of idealized, mongrel truth. We should avoid at all costs any pedigree version of the truth.
SV was and is banned in India as well (in fact, they were the first country to ban it), although I've known quite a few Indians who owned grainy Xeroxed copies of it and always got the impression that it was one of those things where "if you want it you'll know where you can get it, no problem".

Agree totally with Irvine's assessment of Rushdie's major works. I assume the knighthood was probably not awarded 'merely' on the basis of literary merit (despite that formal justification), but rather also as a tribute of sorts to the high personal price he has paid for his art. For what that's worth.
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