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Old 02-18-2007, 09:06 PM   #16
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This brings back horrible memories of being in kindergarten or in school where we got lunches and teachers all felt that milk was good for me, despite my refusal to drink it.

When you're lactose intolerant, it can be hell. And as a child, I just avoided it because I knew it made me feel bad, but you try telling that to a teacher who's shoving it in your face.

Neither of my parents can drink it, and now I live with a roommate who hates milk and it's wonderful because I never see the evil carton in the fridge anymore!
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:08 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vincent Vega
I like milk The calf feeding leads me to another question.
Growing up outside the city you also can see how cows and other animals "reproduce".
How can we spare our children from this traumatizing experience?
like this:


I know, this is no cow
Hahahah! I grew up in the city and learned about it when two stray dogs came in my yard to do the deed.

But I still hate milk.
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:16 PM   #18
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my uncle told me that the big dog was pushing the little dog to the doctor
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:23 PM   #19
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I went to school by a school bus, and sometimes you could just see a cow and a bull doing it.
So you can imagine what happened when the children looked out the window

But that's just normal.

Pushing the dog to the doctor, what a great story

More people are learning about lactose intolerance, which is a good thing.

I only drin milk as cocoa, put some honey in it and heat it up, or use it with cereals or muesli.
Sometimes I eat milk rice as will with cinnamon and sugar
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:37 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vincent Vega


Pushing the dog to the doctor, what a great story

a few weeks later I called 911

and said "Hurry, Mom's hurt and Dad's trying to take her to the doctor."
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:38 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vincent Vega
I went to school by a school bus, and sometimes you could just see a cow and a bull doing it.
So you can imagine what happened when the children looked out the window

But that's just normal.

Pushing the dog to the doctor, what a great story

More people are learning about lactose intolerance, which is a good thing.

I only drin milk as caocao, put some honey in it and heat it up, or use it with cereals or muesli.
Sometimes I eat milk rice as will with cinnamon and sugar

Not many people seem to be reading about real milk,which is a bad thing.

"More people are learning about lactose intolerance, which is a good thing."

There's some connection here we are not making.


*this is a very good topic, worth some thought
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:41 PM   #22
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The link you posted doesn't go anywhere. What are we supposed to be reading? Maybe you can post it?
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:43 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by Liesje
The link you posted doesn't go anywhere. What are we supposed to be reading? Maybe you can post it?
That's a good question then.
I didn't think too much about the not-working-link because I thought it was somehow intentional.

If real milk is something different than dairy link I would like a real link as well
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Old 02-19-2007, 11:50 AM   #24
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I've never liked regular milk (I grew up drinking skim milk, and my mom nursed me when I was a baby). And as I got older, I found myself getting stuffed up from drinking milk. Today I drink soy milk. And I love cheese! I rarely eat yogurt (blech), but I do use cream cheese and sour cream in recipes.
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Old 02-19-2007, 03:41 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally posted by Liesje
I eat cheese like nobody's business. Any food that isn't cheese is just a portal for cheese. I have six different kinds in the fridge at the moment.
This reminds me of a good-natured rant I once heard a fellow Southerner-turned-Midwesterner go off on involving the idea of "You order an effing cup of coffee out here and it's got a slice of cheese floating in it, for God's sake!" Of course Americans in general tend to eat a lot of cheese (which I've never been able to anyhow, due to cow's-milk allergies) but Midwesterners really do seem to be the extreme there. I can still remember my shock when I first moved out here at encountering things like a "side salad" that shows up mounded with shredded cheese, or ordering a slice of apple pie only to be asked "You want cheese on that?".
Quote:
Originally posted by the iron horse
Not many people seem to be reading about real milk,which is a bad thing.

There's some connection here we are not making.

*this is a very good topic, worth some thought
Well perhaps you could explain what connection you wanted to see made and what aspect of the issue you wanted to discuss, because it really isn't self-explanatory. The link is working again at the moment (and you've posted this link before in a thread about 'real butter', as I recall). Hormones and antibiotics? Pasteurization? Big agribusiness vs. small farming? The comparative healthfulness and promotion as such of reduced-fat vs. whole milk? .....??
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Old 02-19-2007, 03:52 PM   #26
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Perhaps this was intended as a discussion about raw milk? Link to recent Salon article (you have to watch a commercial in order to have access to the site).

Below is a clip from the article...

Quote:
Thirty-four-year-old Brigitta Jansen, a statuesque brunette with radiant skin, is no stranger to unpasteurized milk. She grew up in a tiny German village, where she and her grandmother, pails in hand, would fetch milk fresh from a neighbor's farm. But over the years, after moving to a bigger town and then, ultimately, to New York City, she unthinkingly switched to pasteurized milk, which was more convenient and easier to find.

Two years ago, however, while pregnant with her first child, the eczema that had always plagued her got a lot worse. "My skin grew so sensitive. I would stand in the shower and scratch my arms and legs," Jansen says. After a lengthy Internet search, she came across the Weston A. Price Foundation, which promotes the nutritional philosophies of a Canadian dentist who advocated eating traditional foods such as grass-fed beef and raw dairy products. Price's 1939 book, "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration," showed -- with photographic evidence of implausibly straight and cavity-free teeth -- how the nutritionally rich diets of so-called primitive cultures were far healthier than the diets of Western industrial nations.

Jansen bought "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration" and read it cover to cover. After that, "I had to have raw milk," she says. And through the New York City chapter of the WAPF, now 600 members strong, she found a farmer who produced it. After a few months of drinking the milk on a daily basis, Jansen's eczema was gone. She guzzled it throughout her pregnancy and now that she's breast-feeding, craves it even more. "I drink about a quart a day," Jansen says, laughing.

Jansen is part of a growing movement of health-conscious consumers who say that unpasteurized milk -- as long as it's from grass-fed cows -- is capable of reversing chronic diseases from asthma to irritable bowel syndrome. According to raw milk devotees, pasteurization -- which zaps the milk to 145 degrees (or even higher with ultra-pasteurization) -- destroys vitamins A, B12 and C as well as beneficial bacteria such as lactobacillus, enzymes such as phosphatase (which facilitates proper calcium absorption), and an anti-arthritis compound called the Wulzen Factor. Lactobacillus, in turn, breaks down into lactase, an enzyme that helps people digest lactose, making raw milk easier for even the lactose-intolerant to imbibe.
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Old 02-19-2007, 03:58 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally posted by yolland

This reminds me of a good-natured rant I once heard a fellow Southerner-turned-Midwesterner go off on involving the idea of "You order an effing cup of coffee out here and it's got a slice of cheese floating in it, for God's sake!" Of course Americans in general tend to eat a lot of cheese (which I've never been able to anyhow, due to cow's-milk allergies) but Midwesterners really do seem to be the extreme there. I can still remember my shock when I first moved out here at encountering things like a "side salad" that shows up mounded with shredded cheese, or ordering a slice of apple pie only to be asked "You want cheese on that?".
Hehe. I didn't know others thought we take it to the extreme. I guess Wisconsin...I can see it. My husband's grandma is from Wisconsin and when she came for Christmas they told her how much I liked cheese. She was still surprised! My entire extended family has always loved cheese. Maybe it's a Dutch thing or family thing, who knows. We eat cheese like candy bars and even have our own special tools and utensils for properly slicing cheese.

I always ask for cheese on my side salad. I also have weird habits, like I LOVE eating co-jack cheese and popcorn at the same time (not melted on it, just a bit of one, bit of the other) and I like to cut up dill pickles on my cottage cheese. Basically, I like cheese and sodium
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Old 02-19-2007, 04:01 PM   #28
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I'm from Wisconsin, and proud to be a cheese head. I cheese.
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Old 02-19-2007, 04:05 PM   #29
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My grandparents used to be farmers, and my brother and I always drank a glass of milk that came fresh from the cows and was still slightly warm.
That has such a great taste

Fresh milk directly from the farmer is the best you can drink
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Old 02-19-2007, 04:12 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vincent Vega
my brother and I always drank a glass of milk that came fresh from the cows and was still slightly warm.
That reminds me of when I was in Tanzania and they served us warmed milk with breakfast. I don't think it was fresh, just warmed and kept in a thermos....however, they did have a cow out back.
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