Parents Treating Shortness In Their Kids As A Disease - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

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Old 08-31-2006, 12:41 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally posted by Sherry Darling
I am 5 feet tall with my heals on and, at least since that awkward middle school/high school state, I have always loved it, as a lot of men think its cute.

So true! I've found that men find my small size somewhat endearing
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Old 08-31-2006, 01:09 PM   #17
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Originally posted by Ellay

Agreed, it makes no sense at all, but the obstacle certainly exists because society has created it.
Yes, but society creates so many obstacles. People face obstacles because of their looks -should parents thus get plastic surgery for their kids? I never got a large chest and thus am not considered as attractive by many men and some women-should my parents have gotten breast implants for me? My teenage years were very difficult because of that and the insecurities it created. It can still be difficult.

You can become a stronger and better person by dealing with obstacles and overcoming them. So where is the balance for parents? What crosses the line? Is it a parent's job to do anything and everything to eliminate all obstacles for their kids, or does doing so ultimately make life worse for them somehow? Height is not really that much of a handicap in relative terms, certainly not as much as a physical disability. So much of that is wrapped up in our stereotypes about men and women.
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Old 08-31-2006, 01:20 PM   #18
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I'm not sure how good of an opinion I can give because I'm a pretty good height for a woman (5'8) and all the men in my family are tall (my brother is 6'4). So I can't relate to the sense of judgment that really short people get in their daily lives.

I am not sure I'd opt for this because any time you are shooting yourself up with hormones, it's not just fun and games. The truth is you don't know what the long-longterm effects of it are on your health. It reminds me of healthy bone marrow donors who instead of donating their bone marrow, got shots of G-CSF to promote the number of stem cells in their peripheral blood and then their blood was taken rather than the more involved drilling into bone to get the marrow. Well, now more and more people are refusing to donate marrow this way because there are reported cases of leukemias and so on down the road. Frankly, this should have been obvious, but it goes to show that you can't take these procedures lightly.
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Old 08-31-2006, 01:30 PM   #19
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I have a friend who is like 1. 5 mts and she's one of the most secure of independent girls i've ever met, she has had lots of boyfriends and she's smart and atractive. I'm 15 cms taller than her and I'm depressive and lonely. Success doesn't have anything to do with if you are tall or not , and it seems to me that many parents rather to give hormones to their kids instead of teaching them how to feel secures and happy with themselves.
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Old 08-31-2006, 01:34 PM   #20
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I saw a story about that two years ago on CNN. The kid was my age, and he was taller than me before he took the HGH! I was insulted that they called it short.

I personally have been the shortest kid in my school for most of my school career. Only recently have a I surpassed some of the shorter girls in my school.
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Old 08-31-2006, 01:36 PM   #21
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im 5,6 , i wish i was taller but it aint gonna happen so im just gonna get over it.

Not end of the world.
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Old 08-31-2006, 01:52 PM   #22
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I'm still not sure the analogy of height to "physical attractiveness" really works--at least not if we're to accept the conviction of some people in the article, as well as some posters in this thread, that stereotypes about height--for men, anyhow--entail notions of capability and competence...qualities that are needed for career success, not just relationship success. I've been trying to think of something in the long litany of physical-appearance expectations commonly leveled at women that analogizes well to this, and I'm not sure I can think of one, at least not one that would apply to a broad array of fields. Obviously, height isn't equally relevant to all jobs a man might do either--I'm inclined to say it matters little in academia, for example--but I think in quite a few fields it is the case that men who are taller get an automatic leg-up on perceived competence, authority, "potency," whatever you want to call it. And like Ellay said, if it's a question of how other people--like, for example, your boss or your clients--are going to perceive your competence (as opposed to how physically attractive you are), then you can do all the self-esteem exercises, "projecting confidence" drills, etc. you want, but it's not likely to make much difference, because sadly the solution lies in changing their minds, not in adapting yours ("Ah well, so what if some people are narrow and petty, I don't need their approval anyhow"). I guess perhaps the closest analogy to women's challenges here would be the idea that women, period, can't convey authority and competence as well as a man--but that's discrimination of an altogether different magnitude; height isn't covered by civil rights laws for a reason.
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Old 08-31-2006, 02:02 PM   #23
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But couldn't you possibly say that physical attractiveness leads to self esteem issues which ultimately affect all aspects of a person's life, including career success? Poor self esteem can be crippling in so many ways.

Women are still judged on their looks even in the workplace (and more so than men are), and who really knows how that affects hiring, evaluation of performance, promotions, etc? After all, look at someone like Katie Couric who is having her photo altered by her own employer.
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Old 08-31-2006, 02:05 PM   #24
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if i was 3 inches taller i would've went to school for free

stupid parents and their non HGH favoring morals :shakesangryfist:


insane sports parents have been doing this for quite a while... even with kids who aren't neccesarily short, just to get that edge... the possiblity of a scholarship, or more. we do live in a world where parents have kids purposely undergo tommy john surgery when they're 12-13 years old to increase elbow strength when they're in high school, thus increasing chances at a scholarship. messed up
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Old 08-31-2006, 02:09 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
But couldn't you possibly say that physical attractiveness leads to self esteem issues which ultimately affect all aspects of a person's life, including career success? Poor self esteem can be crippling in so many ways.

I'd agree. Of course it's not universal, for most things aren't.

But overall, people who are found attractive in the conventional view are often more successful than those who aren't.

Back to the height thing, one can use Bono as a great example of one who may be compensating for his height, not only with platform shoes but with his ego.
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Old 08-31-2006, 02:58 PM   #26
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Well sure, you could feel insecure about your slight beer belly, or your flat chest, or your pockmarked skin or whatever, and yes that definitely could affect your job performance because it affects your confidence, but these are different from the height issue (again, assuming height really does influence perceptions in the ways the article suggests) because, in most job situations anyway, you're not likely to be perceived as less capable on the basis of them. Obviously there are limits to this--if you're extremely far from the "conventionally attractive" norm in some way, then yes, sadly that might well lead to discriminatory presumptions about (e.g.) your social skills, intelligence, etc. (And I think, particularly in the case of women, this can extend to being exceptionally conventionally attractive--sometimes that can lead to problems with being taken seriously, or to petty jealousies, etc.) But these cases, while certainly angering and stupid, are not the norm.

I agree that one way or another physical appearance, as well as things like accent and tone of voice, posture, etc. enter into probably most any interview situation, performance review, whatever, but at that point you're getting into such murky and impossible-to-quantify territory (Am I wrongly branding this employee sullen because her smile is small? Am I overly impressed with this guy's presence because his shoulders are broad? etc.) that it's kind of a lost cause, I think. Perhaps I'm naive about how corporate office environments work--my job experiences are limited to four years of managing a chain bookstore and six years of college teaching--but in all sincerity, so far as these environments go at least, I don't believe it's the case that women who fall broadly within the "normal" appearance range (whatever that means, right?...lol) commonly suffer reduced opportunities based on appearance alone in any readily quantifiable way. And the same for men of course.

Couric isn't really a very representative example; she's a major national TV personality, and it's generally part of that job description to look good--not movie-star good, but fit, even-complexioned, impeccably dressed, etc. (So far as I can tell, the photo-altering thing is being explained as one employee's bad call, not a reflection of overall network policy about how female anchorwomen should be presented in print photos.) We don't own a TV so I'm not too up on my male anchormen, but from what I see of CNN, etc. when over at friends' houses, I notice the male anchors also usually have on face powder, hair groomed just so, fashionable clothing, etc.; and I do get the impression that overall, they too are generally selected with more of an eye to "nice" looks nowadays (again, not movie-star handsomeness of course) than they used to be. And Bono's not the best example either--he's a rock star, and rock stars are allowed to get away with "compensatory" behavior that might in real life be viewed as obnoxious and unbecoming (I think it's relevant here that shortness in men isn't generally seen as "cute" or "endearing," as Sherry and U2dem put it).
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Old 09-01-2006, 06:48 AM   #27
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How often I see threads like this crop up. If it's not about height it's about something or other that (some) parents wanna force their kids to have so they can 'fit in' or some shit.

Well, well, well... i'm at a loss for words. That it might or might not help the kid 'fit in' is a pretty depressing verdict on the capacity for societal change, isn't it.

Where, pray tell, do we draw the line? I grew up far away from this world, and to this day I am of unimpressive height and build, have crooked teeth, and smoke too much. Do I love these things... mmm no, but try to change me and I'll rip you a new one.

As for the Romans, everyone was short back then, it's just one of the many quirks of history. They conquered much of what we now call the West, and lo and behold, apart from a few legal conventions, their influence is entirely gone with the wind. So much for them, and so much for us, in time. WE DO NOT MATTER EXCEPT TO OURSELVES, AND WE WILL BE DUST SOON ENOUGH.
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Old 09-01-2006, 07:49 AM   #28
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I heard a comment on the radio yesterday about a study showing that taller children had been proved to be more intelligent than shorter ones and found this interesting article http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...0/ai_n15870424

Quote:
Children who grow taller, grow smarter and scientists now believe they know why. Researchers at the University of Bristol have shown that there is a link between a child's IQ and the level of growth hormone circulating in their blood, which determines the speed at which they arrive at their final adult height .This could explain why some shorter children do worse at school. Taller children often have higher IQs and short children treated with growth hormone have seen their IQs improve.

The study involved 547 children who completed an intelligence test at the age of eight. The researchers then measured the level of insulin growth factor (IGF) in their blood. Higher levels of IGF matched higher IQs.

Professor David Gunnell, who led the study, said: 'Poor foetal and post- natal growth are associated with impaired neurodevelopment. Low birthweight babies experience delays in reaching motor milestones and on average have slightly lower IQs than babies of normal weight.'

IGF plays a key role in physical growth and organ development during childhood. The level of IGF in the blood is influenced by diet. Children who drink more milk and eat more dairy produce in early childhood have higher levels

The study only tested a relatively small number of children but I'm not aware of any others which disprove it. It seems the answer is to make sure you give your child enough dairy food as a child -too late for many of us!
From my own experience my younger child who is only 7 is the tallest in his year and has the height of an average 9 year old but I would say he only has average intelligence. As far as I'm concerned his height carries certain disadvanatages at the moment as people who don't know him often presume he's immature as he acts his age rather than how he looks. I also worry that he will end up being extremely tall as an adult which may cause him problems.
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Old 09-01-2006, 05:02 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally posted by Greenlight
I heard a comment on the radio yesterday about a study showing that taller children had been proved to be more intelligent than shorter ones and found this interesting article http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...0/ai_n15870424



The study only tested a relatively small number of children but I'm not aware of any others which disprove it.
I have never noticed this correlation in real life. I've always been short. I am now a 5 ft. 4 in. 39 year old male and last time I checked my IQ, it was 126, and I never was a dummy. I know several short people that are intelligent.
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Old 09-01-2006, 05:09 PM   #30
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Originally posted by 80sU2isBest


I know several short people that are intelligent.
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