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Old 02-16-2010, 01:10 AM   #541
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Bayh Protests GOP Obstructionism By Handing Over His Seat To Them

Senator Evan Bayh of Indiana, blessed with $13 million in his campaign coffers and a commanding lead over any and all contenders, sees trouble on the reelection horizon. With all the anti-Democrat fervor sweeping the red and purple states at the moment, the newest computer models don't paint a pretty picture. Experts now say that Bayh might only defeat his as yet undetermined opponent by 40 percentage points or less, and he just couldn't put his family or his supporters through that kind of public humiliation.

So, Bayh looked back to the Indiana values on which he was raised and thought long and hard about what a good and courageous man ought to do when faced with mild adversity. That was when he decided to do the honorable thing and run like hell.

To that end, Bayh held a press conference on Monday to announce his decision, careful to surround himself with his wife and children just in case things got ugly and he needed a human shield or two.

"It's just so frustrating not being able to get anything done in the divisive climate on Capitol Hill," said Bayh, weeping into his handkerchief. "Sorry. I told myself I wasn't going to cry. Republicans are just so mean! So, I've decided to drop out and effectively hand over my seat to the GOP. That'll show them!"

Throughout his three terms in the Senate, the center-right Democrat has earned a reputation as an independent thinker. His legislative record demonstrates this perfectly. For example, when Republicans were in charge of the Senate, he begrudgingly went along with their agenda. When Democrats took over a few years ago, he went along but did so grudgingly.

Based on the comments posted on the Indianapolis Star's website, Indiana voters fully support Bayh's decision. They see Bayh as a courageous figure for standing up to the gridlock in Washington by bravely buggering off and leaving it for someone else to deal with. A few years ago, a move like this would have looked like a surrender, but now it's just part of a larger trend. In his hasty retreat, Bayh is walking a path cut by trailblazing quitter Sarah Palin, another political figure who is hugely popular in the state for no reason at all.

Other than the partisan difficulties, one of the biggest factors in Bayh's decision to retire from the Senate has to do with his health. Though his family managed to keep it a secret for decades, Bayh suffers from a genetic condition known as Myotonia Congenita, the same disorder that afflicts the fainting goats featured so often on the Discovery Channel. At the first sign of danger or even mild conflict his legs stiffen up and he falls over in a heap.
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Old 02-16-2010, 11:11 AM   #542
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i think everyone can view this as good news and an unqualified success for the Obama administration:


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Secret Joint Raid Captures Taliban’s Top Commander
By MARK MAZZETTI and DEXTER FILKINS

WASHINGTON — The Taliban’s top military commander was captured several days ago in Karachi, Pakistan, in a secret joint operation by Pakistani and American intelligence forces, according to American government officials.

The commander, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, is an Afghan described by American officials as the most significant Taliban figure to be detained since the American-led war in Afghanistan started more than eight years ago. He ranks second in influence only to Mullah Muhammad Omar, the Taliban’s founder and a close associate of Osama bin Laden before the Sept. 11 attacks.

Mullah Baradar has been in Pakistani custody for several days, with American and Pakistani intelligence officials both taking part in interrogations, according to the officials.

It was unclear whether he was talking, but the officials said his capture had provided a window into the Taliban and could lead to other senior officials. Most immediately, they hope he will provide the whereabouts of Mullah Omar, the one-eyed cleric who is the group’s spiritual leader.

Disclosure of Mullah Baradar’s capture came as American and Afghan forces were in the midst of a major offensive in southern Afghanistan.

His capture could cripple the Taliban’s military operations, at least in the short term, said Bruce O. Riedel, a former C.I.A. officer who last spring led the Obama administration’s Afghanistan and Pakistan policy review.

Details of the raid remain murky, but officials said that it had been carried out by Pakistan’s military spy agency, the Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, and that C.I.A. operatives had accompanied the Pakistanis.

The New York Times learned of the operation on Thursday, but delayed reporting it at the request of White House officials, who contended that making it public would end a hugely successful intelligence-gathering effort. The officials said that the group’s leaders had been unaware of Mullah Baradar’s capture and that if it became public they might cover their tracks and become more careful about communicating with each other.

The Times is publishing the news now because White House officials acknowledged that the capture of Mullah Baradar was becoming widely known in the region.

Several American government officials gave details about the raid on the condition that they not be named, because the operation was classified.

American officials believe that besides running the Taliban’s military operations, Mullah Baradar runs the group’s leadership council, often called the Quetta Shura because its leaders for years have been thought to be hiding near Quetta, the capital of Baluchistan Province in Pakistan.

A spokesman for the Taliban insisted on Tuesday that Baradar was still free.

“This is just rumor spread by foreigners to divert attention from the Marja offensive,” said the spokesman, Zabiullah Mujahid.

“They are facing big problems in Marja. In reality there is nothing regarding Baradar’s arrest. He is safe and free and he is in Afghanistan.”

The participation of Pakistan’s spy service could suggest a new level of cooperation from Pakistan’s leaders, who have been ambivalent about American efforts to crush the Taliban. Increasingly, the Americans say, senior leaders in Pakistan, including the chief of its army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, have gradually come around to the view that they can no longer support the Taliban in Afghanistan — as they have quietly done for years — without endangering themselves. Indeed, American officials have speculated that Pakistani security officials could have picked up Mullah Baradar long ago.

The officials said that Pakistan was leading the interrogation of Mullah Baradar, but that Americans were also involved. The conditions of the questioning are unclear. In its first week in office, the Obama administration banned harsh interrogations like waterboarding by Americans, but the Pakistanis have long been known to subject prisoners to brutal questioning.

American intelligence officials believe that elements within Pakistan’s security services have covertly supported the Taliban with money and logistical help — largely out of a desire to retain some ally inside Afghanistan for the inevitable day when the Americans leave.

The ability of the Taliban’s top leaders to operate relatively freely inside Pakistan has for years been a source of friction between the ISI and the C.I.A. Americans have complained that they have given ISI operatives the precise locations of Taliban leaders, but that the Pakistanis usually refuse to act.

The Pakistanis have countered that the American intelligence was often outdated, or that faulty information had been fed to the United States by Afghanistan’s intelligence service.

For the moment it is unclear how the capture of Mullah Baradar will affect the overall direction of the Taliban, who have so far refused to disavow Al Qaeda and to accept the Afghan Constitution. American officials have hoped to win over some midlevel members of the group.

Mr. Riedel, the former C.I.A. official, said that he had not heard about Mullah Baradar’s capture before being contacted by The Times, but that the raid constituted a “sea change in Pakistani behavior.”

In recent weeks, American officials have said they have seen indications that the Pakistani military and spy services may finally have begun to distance themselves from the Taliban. One Obama administration official said Monday that the White House had “no reason to think that anybody was double-dealing at all” in aiding in the capture of Mullah Baradar.

A parade of American officials traveling to the Pakistani capital have made the case that the Afghan Taliban are now aligned with groups — like the Pakistani Taliban — that threaten the stability of the Pakistani government.

Mullah Baradar oversees the group’s operations across its primary area of activity in southern and western Afghanistan. While some of the insurgent groups active in Afghanistan receive only general guidance from their leaders, the Taliban are believed to be somewhat hierarchical, with lower-ranking field commanders often taking directions and orders from their leaders across the border.

In an attempt to improve the Taliban’s image both inside the country and abroad, Mullah Baradar last year helped issue a “code of conduct” for Taliban fighters. The handbook, small enough to be carried in the pocket of each Taliban foot soldier, gave specific guidance about topics including how to avoid civilian casualties, how to win the hearts and minds of villagers, and the necessity of limiting suicide attacks to avoid a backlash.

In recent months, a growing number of Taliban leaders are believed to have fled to Karachi, a sprawling, chaotic city in southern Pakistan hundreds of miles from the turbulence of the Afghan frontier. A diplomat based in Kabul, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said in an interview last month that Mullah Omar had moved to Karachi, and that several of his colleagues were there, too.

The leadership council, which includes more than a dozen of the Taliban’s best-known leaders, charts the overall direction of the war, assigns Taliban “shadow governors” to run many Afghan provinces and districts, and chooses battlefield commanders. It also oversees a number of subcommittees that direct other aspects of the war, like political, religious and military affairs.

According to Wahid Muzhda, a former Taliban official in Kabul who stays in touch with former colleagues, the council meets every three or four months to plot strategy. As recently as three years ago, he said, the council had 19 members. Since then, six have been killed or captured. Others have since filled the empty seats, he said.

Among the council members killed were Mullah Dadullah, who died during a raid by NATO and Afghan forces in 2007. Among the captured were Mullah Obaidullah, the Taliban defense minister, who reported to Mr. Baradar.

“The only man more powerful than Baradar is Omar,” Mr. Muzhda said. “He and Omar cannot meet very often because of security reasons, but they have a very good relationship.”

Western and Afghan officials familiar with the workings of the Taliban’s leadership have described Mullah Baradar as one of the Taliban’s most approachable leaders, and the one most ready to negotiate with the Afghan government.

Mediators who have worked to resolve kidnappings and other serious issues have often approached the Taliban leadership through him.

As in the case of the reclusive Mullah Omar, the public details of Mullah Baradar’s life are murky. According to an Interpol alert, he was born in 1968 in Weetmak, a village in Afghanistan’s Oruzgan Province. Terrorism experts describe him as a skilled military leader who runs many high-level meetings of the Taliban’s top commanders in Afghanistan.

In answers to questions submitted by Newsweek last summer, Mullah Baradar said that he could not maintain “continuous contacts” with Mullah Omar, but that he received advice on “important topics” from the cleric.

In the same interview, Mullah Baradar said he welcomed a large increase in American troops in Afghanistan because the Taliban “want to inflict maximum losses on the Americans, which is possible only when the Americans are present here in large numbers and come out of their fortified places.”

Shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks, Mullah Baradar was assigned by Mullah Omar to assume overall command of Taliban forces in northern Afghanistan. In that role, he oversaw a large group of battle-hardened Arab and foreign fighters who were based in the northern cities of Kunduz and Mazar-i-Sharif.

In November 2001, as Taliban forces collapsed after the American invasion, Mullah Baradar and several other senior Taliban leaders were captured by Afghan militia fighters aligned with the United States. But Pakistani intelligence operatives intervened, and Mullah Baradar and the other Taliban leaders were released, according to a senior official of the Northern Alliance, the group of Afghans aligned with the United States.

Talibans Military Chief, Mullah Baradar, Is Captured - NYTimes.com
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Old 02-16-2010, 11:17 AM   #543
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i think everyone can view this as good news and an unqualified success for the Obama administration:
Pfttt, if they haven't been tortured yet it's not good news...

Call me when they're tortured, dead, or both.
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Old 02-16-2010, 11:49 AM   #544
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can i preemptively note concern about Miranda rights?
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Old 02-16-2010, 12:28 PM   #545
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Pfttt, if they haven't been tortured yet it's not good news...

Call me when they're tortured, dead, or both.
i think Obama should also make a speech with the phrase "Mission Accomplished" on a banner.
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Old 02-16-2010, 01:47 PM   #546
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i think everyone can view this as good news and an unqualified success for the Obama administration:
I think so.

If Obama naps Osama, the planets might need to be realigned.
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Old 02-17-2010, 11:02 AM   #547
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another Obama success: the stimulus.


Quote:
Judging Stimulus by Job Data Reveals Success
By DAVID LEONHARDT

WASHINGTON

Imagine if, one year ago, Congress had passed a stimulus bill that really worked.

Let’s say this bill had started spending money within a matter of weeks and had rapidly helped the economy. Let’s also imagine it was large enough to have had a huge impact on jobs — employing something like two million people who would otherwise be unemployed right now.

If that had happened, what would the economy look like today?

Well, it would look almost exactly as it does now. Because those nice descriptions of the stimulus that I just gave aren’t hypothetical. They are descriptions of the actual bill.

Just look at the outside evaluations of the stimulus. Perhaps the best-known economic research firms are IHS Global Insight, Macroeconomic Advisers and Moody’s Economy.com. They all estimate that the bill has added 1.6 million to 1.8 million jobs so far and that its ultimate impact will be roughly 2.5 million jobs. The Congressional Budget Office, an independent agency, considers these estimates to be conservative.

Yet I’m guessing you don’t think of the stimulus bill as a big success. You’ve read columns (by me, for example) complaining that it should have spent money more quickly. Or you’ve heard about the phantom ZIP code scandal: the fact that a government Web site mistakenly reported money being spent in nonexistent ZIP codes.

And many of the criticisms are valid. The program has had its flaws. But the attention they have received is wildly disproportionate to their importance. To hark back to another big government program, it’s almost as if the lasting image of the lunar space program was Apollo 6, an unmanned 1968 mission that had engine problems, and not Apollo 11, the moon landing.

The reasons for the stimulus’s middling popularity aren’t a mystery. The unemployment rate remains near 10 percent, and many families are struggling. Saying that things could have been even worse doesn’t exactly inspire. Liberals don’t like the stimulus because they wish it were bigger. Republicans don’t like it because it’s a Democratic program. The Obama administration hurt the bill’s popularity by making too rosy an economic forecast upon taking office.

Moreover, the introduction of the most visible parts of the program — spending on roads, buildings and the like — has been a bit sluggish. Aid to states, unemployment benefits and some tax provisions have been more successful and account for far more of the bill. But their successes are not obvious.

Even if the conventional wisdom is understandable, however, it has consequences. Because the economy is still a long way from being healthy, members of Congress are now debating another, smaller stimulus bill. (They’re calling it a “jobs bill,” seeing stimulus as a dirty word.) The logical thing to do would be to examine what worked and what didn’t in last year’s bill.

But that’s not what is happening. Instead, the debate is largely disconnected from the huge stimulus experiment we just ran. Why? As Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts, the newest member of Congress, said, in a nice summary of the misperceptions, the stimulus might have saved some jobs, but it “didn’t create one new job.”



The case against the stimulus revolves around the idea that the economy would be no worse off without it. As a Wall Street Journal opinion piece put it last year, “The resilience of the private sector following the fall 2008 panic — not the fiscal stimulus program — deserves the lion’s share of the credit for the impressive growth improvement.” In a touch of unintended irony, two of article’s three authors were listed as working at a research institution named for Herbert Hoover.

Of course, no one can be certain about what would have happened in an alternate universe without a $787 billion stimulus. But there are two main reasons to think the hard-core skeptics are misguided — above and beyond those complicated, independent economic analyses.

The first is the basic narrative that the data offer. Pick just about any area of the economy and you come across the stimulus bill’s footprints.

In the early months of last year, spending by state and local governments was falling rapidly, as was tax revenue. In the spring, tax revenue continued to drop, yet spending jumped — during the very time when state and local officials were finding out roughly how much stimulus money they would be receiving. This is the money that has kept teachers, police officers, health care workers and firefighters employed.

Then there is corporate spending. It surged in the final months of last year. Mark Zandi of Economy.com (who has advised the McCain campaign and Congressional Democrats) says that the Dec. 31 expiration of a tax credit for corporate investment, which was part of the stimulus, is a big reason.

The story isn’t quite as clear-cut with consumer spending, as skeptics note. Its sharp plunge stopped before President Obama signed the stimulus into law exactly one year ago. But the billions of dollars in tax cuts, food stamps and jobless benefits in the stimulus have still made a difference. Since February, aggregate wages and salaries have fallen, while consumer spending has risen. The difference between the two — some $100 billion — has essentially come from stimulus checks.

The second argument in the bill’s favor is the history of financial crises. They have wreaked terrible damage on economies. Indeed, the damage tended to be even worse than what we have suffered.

Around the world over the last century, the typical financial crisis caused the jobless rate to rise for almost five years, according to work by the economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff. On that timeline, our rate would still be rising in early 2012. Even that may be optimistic, given that the recent crisis was so bad. As Ben Bernanke, Henry Paulson (Republicans both) and many others warned in 2008, this recession had the potential to become a depression.

Yet the jobless rate is now expected to begin falling consistently by the end of this year.

For that, the stimulus package, flaws and all, deserves a big heaping of credit. “It prevented things from getting much worse than they otherwise would have been,” Nariman Behravesh, Global Insight’s chief economist, says. “I think everyone would have to acknowledge that’s a good thing.”

So what now?

The last year has shown — just as economists have long said — that aid to states and cities may be the single most effective form of stimulus. Unlike road- or bridge-building, it can happen in a matter of weeks. And unlike tax cuts, state and local aid never languishes in a household’s savings account.

The ideal follow-up stimulus would start with that aid. It would then add on extended jobless benefits, which also tend to be spent, as well as tax credits carefully drafted to get businesses to hire and households to spend, like the cash-for-clunkers program.

By this yardstick, the $154 billion bill that the House passed in December is decent. It includes $27 billion in state and local aid, $79 billion for jobless benefits and other safety nets, and $48 billion in infrastructure spending.

The smaller bills being considered by the Senate are worse. They may end up with no state aid at all, and their tax credits sound better — with promises to help the long-term unemployed and small businesses — than they are. “The economic impact of the Senate bill, at this point, is starting to look very small,” Mr. Behravesh says.

Given what people have been saying about a successful stimulus bill, just imagine what they’ll say about one that doesn’t accomplish much.

Economic Scene - Success of Stimulus Bill Is Noteworthy as Another Is Weighed - NYTimes.com
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Old 02-17-2010, 11:29 AM   #548
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and, to further prove the point how just how biased and "balanced" FoxNews is, check out their piece on the anniversary of the stimulus:


Quote:
Silver Lining Hard to Find for Some on Anniversary of Stimulus

While the Obama administration and congressional Democrats are out in force this week touting the success of the $787 billion economic stimulus package signed exactly one year ago, critics are pointing to a still-dismal jobs picture and deflating public confidence as signs that the ballyhooed benefits of the stimulus bill, as one GOP leader put it, were a "fiction" and not worth the cost.

The United States of America owes $1.6 trillion more today than it did a year ago. The jobless rate has climbed from 8.1 percent to 9.7 percent. And the deficit has soared to record levels, with another record likely to be set this year.

Happy anniversary.

While the Obama administration and congressional Democrats are out in force this week touting the success of the $787 billion economic stimulus package, signed exactly one year ago, critics are pointing to a still-dismal jobs picture and deflating public confidence as signs that the ballyhooed benefits of the stimulus bill, as one GOP leader put it, were a "fiction." And certainly not worth the cost.

President Obama and Vice President Biden argued Wednesday that the stimulus has saved or created 2 million jobs.

Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele called that estimate "nonsense."

"I don't know what that is. I don't know what that looks like. If I can't put my fingers on it, if I can't touch it and if I can't get up at 6 o'clock in the morning and go to work there, then it's not happening, and that's the reality of a lot of people right now," Steele told Fox News.

While employers are shedding far fewer jobs than they were last year, the stimulus hasn't jolted hiring in the way it was advertised -- 49 states saw a net job loss in 2009, according to recent statistics. It's also contributed to record debt and deficits -- the national debt has reached nearly $12.4 trillion, while this fiscal year's deficit is expected to hit about $1.6 trillion. At the same time, President Obama is creating a panel to study ways to bring those numbers down.

The public is losing faith. A recent CBS News/New York Times survey showed only 6 percent of Americans believe the stimulus has created a significant number of jobs.

But here's the good news: The national economy as a whole is growing, a strong sign that the nation is not sliding back into recession. The jobless rate has pulled back from a high of 10.2 percent. Advocates of the stimulus argue that while unemployment is bad, the situation is better than it would have been without the stimulus -- a claim that can neither be proved nor disproved -- and that Republicans are talking out of both sides of their mouths, railing against the package while reaping its benefits in their home states.

"We acted because failure to do so would have led to catastrophe," Obama said Wednesday. "One year later, it is largely thanks to the recovery act that a second depression is no longer a possibility."

Biden said Wednesday on CBS' "The Early Show" that the package is only "halfway" done. Christina Romer, head of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, said on ABC's "Good Morning America" that state aid, a huge part of the package, has kept hundreds of thousands of state workers on the payroll and that the next step is to "translate" the GDP growth into more jobs. She and Biden both predict job growth by spring.

"We've seen a dramatic turnaround in this economy in the last year," Democratic National Committee Chairman Tim Kaine told Fox News on Wednesday. "We're not where we want to be yet, but it's great that we were able to ... stop the freefall in jobs."

But positive GDP growth isn't exactly the kind of thing that outside-the-Beltway Americans are going to notice on a day-to-day basis. Home values, 401k's, jobs and other real-world indicators are the proof many are looking for. While the stock market is back from the rock-bottom lows of early 2009, it's far from where it was before the crisis on Wall Street.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said in a statement Wednesday that the first anniversary of the stimulus is nothing to celebrate.

"In the first year of the trillion-dollar stimulus, Americans have lost millions of jobs, the unemployment rate continues to hover near 10 percent, the deficit continues to soar and we're inundated with stories of waste, fraud and abuse," he said. "This was not the plan Americans asked for or the results they were promised."

FOXNews.com - Silver Lining Hard to Find for Some on Anniversary of Stimulus


LOL @ "for some ..."
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Old 02-17-2010, 04:35 PM   #549
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and, to further prove the point how just how biased and "balanced" FoxNews is, check out their piece on the anniversary of the stimulus:
Both articles seem pretty reasonable, Irvine.
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Old 02-17-2010, 04:55 PM   #550
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and, to further prove the point how just how biased and "balanced" FoxNews is, check out their piece on the anniversary of the stimulus:
And actually, when I checked Foxnews this afternoon, they had this piece posted directly "above" the piece you didn't like.

FOXNews.com - White House: Stimulus Had 'Undeniable' Impact on Economy
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Old 02-17-2010, 04:58 PM   #551
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Both articles seem pretty reasonable, Irvine.


really? one cites facts an analysis, the other cites the worst polls imaginable and Michael Steele.

it's text book right wing talking points, handed down by Ailes, and precisely how Fox operates. "economists agree that the stimulus has worked, but we found someone with a different opinion -- who's right? you decide."
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Old 02-17-2010, 04:59 PM   #552
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And actually, when I checked Foxnews this afternoon, they had this piece posted directly "above" the piece you didn't like.

FOXNews.com - White House: Stimulus Had 'Undeniable' Impact on Economy


yes, of course, this is, again, how it works. don't like the good news? here's something with a more negative slant that will make you feel better.

and if you read it to the end, you get roughly the same copy:

Quote:
Republicans were not so optimistic. Republican National Committee Chairman called the claim that the bill has saved or created 2 million jobs "fiction" and said the administration was not focusing enough on the private sector.

"This administration fundamentally doesn't understand that and the American people know it and they're responding in kind," Steele told Fox News.

A recent CBS News/New York Times survey showed only 6 percent of Americans believe the stimulus has created a significant number of jobs.

But White House economic adviser Christina Romer suggested that the best of the stimulus is yet to come.

Asked Wednesday on ABC's "Good Morning America" whether the "biggest bang" from the package has already been felt, Romer responded: "Absolutely not."

She said more jobs creation is on the way.

"Certainly in terms of the level of the things we care about, like employment and the unemployment rate, those effects are going to grow over time," she said.

That appeared to be a turnaround from her testimony before Congress last October.

At the time, Romer told the Joint Economic Committee that the recovery package would have its "greatest impact on growth" in the second and third quarters of 2009. By mid-2010, she said, the bill would be "contributing little" to growth.

But back then, Romer and other White House officials were hard at work managing expectations as unemployment was climbing. Romer was also talking about GDP growth in that section of the testimony.
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Old 02-17-2010, 05:02 PM   #553
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another Obama success: the stimulus.
Leonhardt writes very well and is great at putting economic concepts in terms the average person can understand.

The most important things in this article are his citing of IHS Global Insight, Moody's and Macro. These are the non partisan, highly respected economic analysts who deal in things as they are. Its not like Brookings or Hoover, which are both credible but have a moderate bias toward one side or another. They are not bleeding heart liberals or tea party conservatives, their reputations are based on calling it like it is to private sector, gov't, media, etc clients.

So basically, everyone has to ask themselves a question: Do you believe the people mentioned above, or do you believe people like Michael Steele and John Boehner who not only have no demonstrable understanding of the economy, but have a partisan agenda to push?

If Obama were to get this simple message that Leonhardt is relaying out more, he would have independents back in a heart beat. All he has to do is say "don't listen to me, listen to IHS, listen to McCain's guy, Zandi, listen to the CBO, look at history of past financial crises." Basically, Congressional Republicans and the tea party (a small group of people relative to the country) are the only ones saying the stimulus has not worked.

Combine that with a constant reminder that it is the people who caused this that are now asking to be let back in to fix it, and independents move back toward the Dems.

The unemployment rate is going down, Biden and Romer are right, it will continue to go down as the economy strengthens through the Spring and Summer. Things are of course still tough, but anyone who thinks that Obama came in promising to wave the magic wand of hope and change and have everything be perfect clearly did not listen to him throughout the campaign. He made very clear things would get worse before they got better, there was no economically possible way around that. Obama even went as far as to flat out warn people not to project "martyr" or "chosen one" or "perfect" or any other fix all capabilities onto him.

@Steele. This guy is a joke, I don't even have any Republican friends who think otherwise! "He can't see it and feel it, go at 6 AM" Well, count yourself lucky, Mr Steele, that you don't have to get a real job. All he has to do is talk to the teachers who hit the classroom at 6 or the cop that hits the briefing room at 7 or the factory worker who hits the gate at 6 to "see it and feel it" Instead, he says he can not see it, so its not good enough, Obama is asking us to take his word for it. Actually, no he is just pointing out the objective, undisputable facts about the bill as compiled by independent sources.

It is fiction?! Is he out of his mind? If he wants to call this fiction, then he has to either a.)be ready to get called absurd or b.)show us his alternate, equally objective and reliable method to Moody's and IHS and CBO that he used to arrive at his conclusion that this is "fiction." Of course, the "liberal media" will not call him out on this, even though it is a blatant lie. All the credit to the Republican message machine, though, they have grasped one thing very well: we can lie about economics all we want, because there is not a person in the media who understands it enough to call us out anyway.

So once again, we have Republicans telling us to deny reality and take their word for it. Call it "faith based" if you will!
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Old 02-17-2010, 08:42 PM   #554
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yes, of course, this is, again, how it works. don't like the good news? here's something with a more negative slant that will make you feel better.
Two viewpoints. I can see why that would be troubling


(And people wonder why Senator Bayh had enough...)
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Old 02-18-2010, 01:15 AM   #555
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Two viewpoints. I can see why that would be troubling


no.

two articles, weighted as if they were of equal merit, wherein lies the bias.

it's like when people talk about "teach the controversy" when it comes to something like evolution.

there is no controversy. to even agree that there is one, much less to pretend that the "other side" has equal merit, is to create a false perception of the situation.

this is what Fox does. "does all this snow in DC mean that global warming is a hoax? that's for you to decide."
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