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Old 09-01-2005, 05:55 PM   #166
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wow, people are shooting at rescue helis from hospitals too.. crying out things like "go to help my family first"

well, a couple of bad things happen in Nawlins..

it is an issue of gun control too, but keep your guns there you see what you get with ´em, defending yourself, yeah.

but the lootings etc are nmore a side effect

why wasnt the FEMA prepared better is a good question, it seems the US spends so much money on being safe but in the case of crisis they never are prepared good enough

what about the disaster the oil platforms will cause

currently it seems this city and the surrounding area is in total chaos. not controlled by army/ state. the chaos will only broaden if the national guard doesnt react accordingly.

it is reported there are thousands of deaths. who knows how many more will die in the panic. at the superdome there are riots for bus seats to get away.

our government has decided to send our own help troops to get our citizens out, since the US forces don´t have time right now for those who are (apparently) stuck in a (relatively safe) hotel room. they have other priorities, which is understandable, so we´re sending our own red cross etc. to get them out.
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Old 09-01-2005, 06:06 PM   #167
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Also, 6800 soldiers of the national guard are stuck in Iraq when they probably would be needed elsewhere.. just as a side comment.. however the Pentagon says that 65% of the Mississippi national guard are still in the US. Lets hope coordination goes quick and they are fast enough to prevent many more deaths.
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Old 09-01-2005, 07:39 PM   #168
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Originally posted by clarityat3am
The discussion I just had with my grandmother about the hurricane went kind of like this:
Funny, I had that same discussion with my mom ten minutes ago. On that note, let's try to keep politics in the other thread.

PS -- they found Blueberry Hill! Fats Domino was identified from a picture taken Monday night by a newspaper photog. they don't know where he is now but they're pretty sure he was evacuated to the Superdome so he may be somewhere in there or the Astrodome at this point.
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Old 09-01-2005, 07:43 PM   #169
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And now the Mayor of NOLA is basically telling people still in the city (including the Superdome refugees) that they're on their own and that they need to find their own way out of the city, because S&R teams sure ain't coming if they're getting shot at. People are all over TV screaming for help, babies screaming, people shooting each other to get on buses, shooting at cops, shooting at hospitals (hospitals, for god's sake!)...

The way this "rescue effort" is going, it's starting to look like an unmitigated disaster. One would think that perhaps at least a plan would have been put in place to evacuate the persons sheltering in the Superdome in case of a fatal levee breach.

This is so sad. It's like downtown Mogadishu in New Orleans.
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Old 09-01-2005, 11:07 PM   #170
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This is so sad. It's like downtown Mogadishu in New Orleans.
Yeah, thats how people will react when they have no water, no food, no sanitary, live in stinking crumbling shacks.

This is what you call extreme poverty and about a billion people witness that every single day while we are proud on our democratic wealthy countries.

just as a sidenote.
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Old 09-01-2005, 11:19 PM   #171
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Originally posted by whenhiphopdrovethebigcars


Yeah, thats how people will react when they have no water, no food, no sanitary, live in stinking crumbling shacks.

This is what you call extreme poverty and about a billion people witness that every single day while we are proud on our democratic wealthy countries.

just as a sidenote.
Yep, August 29th was a day of horror for Gulf Coast citizens leading to a collapse of social infrastructure resulting in a lack of clean water, food, medicine and shelter. For a billion or so people around the world, it was just another Monday living in those conditions.

Everyone is looking for a bright spot of these things, perhaps this might enlighten many as to what hundreds of millions of people are enduring in everyday life on this planet without being hammered by a natural disaster. Lights might finally come on in people's heads as to how fortunate we are and how we need to stop this everyday tragedy in our world.
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Old 09-02-2005, 04:45 AM   #172
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I haven't read all the posts yet...

But on my local news, they were talking about how some sherifs there in New O were turning in their badges because they couldn't deal with the looters........



I don't know how I'd feel about that.
THat would be really tough for me.

People should get what they need to live, and basic survival is a law of nature, so I don't have a problem with that. But I still think the law should be upheld when it comes to violence, rioting.....

I don't know..........
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Old 09-02-2005, 05:00 AM   #173
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Originally posted by trevster2k
Yep, August 29th was a day of horror for Gulf Coast citizens leading to a collapse of social infrastructure resulting in a lack of clean water, food, medicine and shelter. For a billion or so people around the world, it was just another Monday living in those conditions.

Everyone is looking for a bright spot of these things, perhaps this might enlighten many as to what hundreds of millions of people are enduring in everyday life on this planet without being hammered by a natural disaster. Lights might finally come on in people's heads as to how fortunate we are and how we need to stop this everyday tragedy in our world.
I'm glad someone brought this up because I didn't want to be the one to say it. I know that people probably get tired of me harping on this, but since I am after all living in the middle of the poor, developing world, it is something I feel strongly about.

What you are seeing happen in NOLA is horrible. It shouldn't be happening. It goes against all of what we hold dear regarding human dignity and the value of a well-organized society.

But I hope that if anything it might help people realize the horrible realities of poverty. People all across the world live in chaos and filth and poverty like this on a daily basis. And there is little to no outcry. Sure, we all feel bad for the poor and hope that those folk in Africa will someday "advance" to our level and be able to "compete in the global marketplace" but from where I am standing, there are critical issues that have to be addressed on the ground. Things like clean water to drink and safe houses to live in, medical care to combat malaria and AIDS, basic education, and maternal care to combat the shocking amount of infant deaths and deaths of mothers during delivery....just to name a few.

No one said it would be easy and of course efforts to help have to be coordinated and properly managed, but the fact of the matter is that it is a disgrace to all of us who partake in the human race when our brothers and sisters are suffering in these conditions. People are people, no matter what color they are and no matter where they live. Maybe it is cheesy and simplistic, but I think that Bono was on to something. "Where you live should not decide whether you live or whether you die."
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:11 AM   #174
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good to see you verte

here's just a small glimpse of what it's like there

Stories of heartbreak and hope in Katrina's wake
New Orleans airport housing medical patients

Posted: 5:28 p.m. ET
CNN's Ed Lavandera in Kenner, Louisiana

There are about 25 helicopters ferrying people back and forth between the New Orleans airport and the city of New Orleans. The airport is becoming a military airfield.

Equipment normally used to move luggage around is being used to move people instead. Inside the terminal of the airport, the FEMA medical teams are overwhelmed with the number of people here.

We have seen many critical patients who have been pulled from area hospitals and brought here. We saw one body taken off a plane on the back of one of these luggage racks.

It is a tense scene inside. I came across a maternity ward of women holding their newborn babies. Every woman was holding a newborn baby except for one woman who had only a picture of her child.

She said her baby had been taken to the intensive care unit. As she was readying to board an aircraft for Ft. Worth, Texas, she told me she didn't know where to find her baby.

The plan is to move a lot of these people out of the airport on fixed-wing aircraft presumably either to Houston or Ft. Worth or other parts of Louisiana as well.

I've also been told by one FEMA official who said they're doing a nationwide bed count of hospitals, perhaps looking for any kind of place that might be able to handle all of these people.
Police struggle to maintain order

Posted: 5:18 p.m. ET
CNN's Chris Lawrence in New Orleans, Louisiana

Police tell us that someone did go by the New Orleans Convention Center and fire at some of the people standing outside. We believe they have that person in custody, although it is hard to get information. The police are very, very tense right now. So it's a little difficult to have them stop and explain what happened.

They're literally riding around with full assault weapons and in full tactical gear in pickup trucks.

It's tough to verify from our vantage point here, but one of the officers said that some of the inmates at the Orleans Parish jail may have taken control of the prison. From what we are hearing, the prisoners have weapons. They have not left the jail. They can't get out. But we heard that they have control of weapons inside the jail.

I never want to compare anything to what's happening in Iraq, but there is one similarity in that the ability to move about as reporters is slowly becoming compromised. To be as safe as possible, we have to sacrifice some of our ability to go out and confirm information and verify stories. And right now, with this safety situation in the city of New Orleans, that's just not possible.
Shots fired at evacuated patients

Posted: 3:18 p.m. ET
CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Doctors told me that while trying to evacuate critical patients from Charity Hospital in New Orleans, two of the evacuation vehicles came under fire. The doctors said they were able to get all but one of the patients out of the hospital.

Who was shooting at these vehicles? The doctor I spoke to had no idea. He said a person in a white shirt from a high building started firing upon them as they were trying to evacuate.

Charity Hospital is one of the bigger hospitals in downtown New Orleans. It has a lot of indigent patients. As the doctors were describing it to me, the hospital is overflowing with patients right now and has poor resources.

Doctors said there is lots of water in Charity Hospital's hallways. There's poor electricity and poor resources.

They are trying to move their patients down to Tulane's hospital.

The doctors were frightened for their lives. There was no police presence except for the private armed guards. There was no U.S. military presence. They were very concerned about this. (See the video report of a sniper's attack at the hospital -- 1:06)

This is shocking as a doctor. As a human being, it's unbelievable.

Right now, I'm sitting at this airstrip in Baton Rouge waiting for a helicopter that is coming to evacuate infants. But they are indefinitely delayed because they think it is too dangerous to go in there and land a helicopter and bring these infants to Houston.

I've been in Iraq and Sri Lanka. It is remarkable that this is happening at hospitals here where patients are trying to be evacuated.
Calm prevails amid Mississippi devastation

Posted: 2:20 p.m. ET
CNN's Ted Rowlands in Biloxi, Mississippi

It is a heartbreaking situation in Biloxi, Mississippi, but it pales in comparison to what is happening in New Orleans. There is calm here. There is little unrest.

Additionally, there are some signs that help has arrived. But it is a huge endeavor to clean this area. Most of the structures along the coast have been completely demolished.

The clear difference between Biloxi and New Orleans is that the bodies that are turning up here have been dead for a number of days. They are being found in houses. They were killed in the initial rush of the storm. ( Watch the video detailing corpse recovery in Mississippi -- 3:28)

It isn't bodies in streets. The destruction isn't in a concentrated area. We are talking about pockets of pain in a hundred mile stretch of shore.
Guard gathering in Baton Rouge

Posted: 1:20 p.m. ET
CNN's Deborah Feyerick in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Right now, the main priority is to restore order to New Orleans.

One official told us, "You can't rescue people when you're being shot at." (See the video of how violence is hindering help -- 3:13)

There are hundreds of people from the National Guard here in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We're seeing people from all the agencies. They're waiting to deploy.

Their sense is that the condition inside New Orleans is so unstable they don't want to be sending people into harm's way.

Some state officials, though, have been getting into the center of town.

One of them, for example, got in with a bus. He saw one woman who was so desperate she actually handed her 2-month-old baby to another woman and said, "Take my child. I can't get on this bus, but you've got to try to save the child."

The woman promised her she would take care of that baby.
Living like animals

Posted: 1:07 p.m. ET
CNN's Chris Lawrence in New Orleans, Louisiana

It's hard to believe this is New Orleans.

We spent the last few hours at the New Orleans Convention Center. There are thousands of people lying in the street. (See the video of people living among the dead -- 4:36 )

We saw mothers holding babies, some of them just three, four and five months old, living in horrible conditions. Diapers littered the ground. Feces were on the ground. Sewage was spilled all around.

These people are being forced to live like animals. When you look at the mothers, your heart just breaks.

Some of the images we have gathered are very, very graphic.

We saw dead bodies. People are dying at the center and there is no one to get them. We saw a grandmother in a wheelchair pushed up to the wall and covered with a sheet. Right next to her was another dead body wrapped in a white sheet.

Right in front of us a man went into a seizure on the ground. No one here has medical training. There is nowhere to evacuate these people to.

People have been sitting there without food and water and waiting. They are asking -- "When are the buses coming? When are they coming to help us?"

We just had to say we don't know.

The people tell us that National Guard units have come by as a show of force. They have tossed some military rations out. People are eating potato chips to survive and are looting some of the stores nearby for food and drink. It is not the kind of food these people need.

They are saying, "Don't leave us here to die. We are stuck here. Why can't they send the buses? Are they going to leave us here to die?"
'We have to deal with the living'

Posted: 10:49 a.m. ET
CNN's Rick Sanchez in Metairie, Louisiana

We spent the night at the New Orleans Saints' training facility. It is the encampment for the FEMA officials and National Guard troops who will deploy out to certain areas.

They just deployed a new unit out here from California. They're called swift water operation rescue units. These folks are trained to go in and get people out of the homes that they have been stuck in for days now with water all around.

We were with a unit last night on a boat. We watched as they performed many of these rescues. It's quite a sight to see. Bodies are floating along the flooded road. And I asked them, "What do you do about that?" They said, "There's no time to deal with them now. We have to deal with the living." (See the video of thousands stranded among sewage and bodies on the riverfront -- 2:54)

We went off into many communities to see if we could find people. As we were navigating through these narrow areas with power lines and all kinds of obstructions above and below us, we suddenly heard faint screams coming from homes. People were yelling, "Help! Help!"

We found one elderly woman in one home. She told us, "I've been here and I need to get out. Can you get me?" Then she said, "But there are people next door and they have babies, so leave me until morning. Get them out now."

So we contacted the swift water rescue units and they went out there. To our surprise and their surprise there were no fewer than 15 people huddled in their home. We could only hear them. We couldn't see them. We were able to assist and get the right people over there to get them out.

Just like them, there may be literally thousands that need to be rescued. It's a very daunting task for these officials.
Chaos at the convention center

Posted: 10:02 a.m. ET
CNN's Jim Spellman in New Orleans, Louisiana

I don't think I really have the vocabulary for this situation.

We just heard a couple of gunshots go off. There's a building smoldering a block away. People are picking through whatever is left in the stores right now. They are walking the streets because they have nowhere else to go.

Right now, I'm a few blocks away from the New Orleans Convention Center area. We drove through there earlier, and it was unbelievable. Thousands and thousands and thousands of people spent the night sleeping on the street, on the sidewalk, on the median.

The convention center is a place that people were told to go to because it would be safe. In fact, it is a scene of anarchy.

There is absolutely nobody in control. There is no National Guard, no police, no information to be had.

The convention center is next to the Mississippi River. Many people who are sleeping there feel that a boat is going to come and get them. Or they think a bus is going to come. But no buses have come. No boats have come. They think water is going come. No water has come. And they have no food.

As we drove by, people screamed out to us -- "Do you have water? Do you have food? Do you have any information for us?"

We had none of those.

Probably the most disturbing thing is that people at the convention center are starting to pass away and there is simply nothing to do with their bodies. There is nowhere to put them. There is no one who can do anything with them. This is making everybody very, very upset.
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:22 AM   #175
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New Orleans Mayor Issues 'Desperate SOS'
Sep 01 5:39 PM


By ADAM NOSSITER
Associated Press Writer

NEW ORLEANS

Storm victims were raped and beaten, fights and fires broke out, corpses lay out in the open, and rescue helicopters and law enforcement officers were shot at as flooded-out New Orleans descended into anarchy Thursday. "This is a desperate SOS," the mayor said.

Anger mounted across the ruined city, with thousands of storm victims increasingly hungry, desperate and tired of waiting for buses to take them out.

"We are out here like pure animals. We don't have help," the Rev. Issac Clark, 68, said outside the New Orleans Convention Center, where corpses lay in the open and the and other evacuees complained that they were dropped off and given nothing _ no food, no water, no medicine.

About 15,000 to 20,000 people who had taken shelter at the convention center to await buses grew increasingly hostile. Police Chief Eddie Compass said he sent in 88 officers to quell the situation at the building, but they were quickly beaten back by an angry mob.

"We have individuals who are getting raped, we have individuals who are getting beaten," Compass said. "Tourists are walking in that direction and they are getting preyed upon."

In hopes of defusing the unrest at the convention center, Mayor Ray Nagin gave the refugees permission to march across a bridge to the city's unflooded west bank for whatever relief they can find. But the bedlam at the convention center appeared to make leaving difficult.

A military heliocpter tried to land at the convention center several times to drop off food and water. But the rushing crowd forced the choppers to back off. Troopers then tossed the supplies to the crowd from 10 feet off the ground and flew away.

National Guardsmen poured in to help restore order and put a stop to the looting, carjackings and gunfire that have gripped New Orleans in the days since Hurricane Katrina plunged much of the city under water.

In a statement to CNN, Nagin said: "This is a desperate SOS. Right now we are out of resources at the convention center and don't anticipate enough buses. We need buses. Currently the convention center is unsanitary and unsafe and we're running our of supplies."

In Washington, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said the government is sending in 1,400 National Guardsmen a day to help stop looting and other lawlessness in New Orleans. Already, 2,800 National Guardsmen are in the city, he said.

But across the flooded-out city, the rescuers themselves came under attack from storm victims.

"Hospitals are trying to evacuate," said Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Cheri Ben-Iesan, spokesman at the city emergency operations center. "At every one of them, there are reports that as the helicopters come in people are shooting at them. There are people just taking potshots at police and at helicopters, telling them, `You better come get my family.'"

Some Federal Emergency Management rescue operations were suspended in areas where gunfire has broken out, Homeland Security spokesman Russ Knocke said in Washington. "In areas where our employees have been determined to potentially be in danger, we have pulled back," he said.

A National Guard military policeman was shot in the leg as he and a man scuffled for the MP's rifle, police Capt. Ernie Demmo said. The man was arrested.

"These are good people. These are just scared people," Demmo said.

Outside the Convention Center, the sidewalks were packed with people without food, water or medical care, and with no sign of law enforcement. Thousands of storm refugees had been assembling outside for days, waiting for buses that did not come.

At least seven bodies were scattered outside, and hungry people broke through the steel doors to a food service entrance and began pushing out pallets of water and juice and whatever else they could find.

An old man in a chaise lounge lay dead in a grassy median as hungry babies wailed around him. Around the corner, an elderly woman lay dead in her wheelchair, covered with a blanket, and another body lay beside her wrapped in a sheet.

"I don't treat my dog like that," 47-year-old Daniel Edwards said as he pointed at the woman in the wheelchair. "I buried my dog." He added: "You can do everything for other countries but you can't do nothing for your own people. You can go overseas with the military but you can't get them down here."

The street outside the center, above the floodwaters, smelled of urine and feces, and was choked with dirty diapers, old bottles and garbage.

"They've been teasing us with buses for four days," Edwards said.

People chanted, "Help, help!" as reporters and photographers walked through. The crowd got angry when journalists tried to photograph one of the bodies, and covered it over with a blanket. A woman, screaming, went on the front steps of the convention center and led the crowd in reciting the 23rd Psalm.

John Murray, 52, said: "It's like they're punishing us."

The Superdome, where some 25,000 people were being evacuated by bus to the Houston Astrodome, descended into chaos as well.

Huge crowds, hoping to finally escape the stifling confines of the stadium, jammed the main concourse outside the dome, spilling out over the ramp to the Hyatt hotel next door _ a seething sea of tense, unhappy, people packed shoulder-to-shoulder up to the barricades where heavily armed National Guardsmen stood.

At the front of the line, heavily armed policemen and guardsmen stood watch and handed out water as tense and exhausted crowds struggled onto buses. At the back end of the line, people jammed against police barricades in the rain. Luggage, bags of clothes, pillows, blankets were strewn in the puddles.

Many people had dogs and they cannot take them on the bus. A police officer took one from a little boy, who cried until he vomited. "Snowball, snowball," he cried. The policeman told a reporter he didn't know what would happen to the dog.

Fights broke out. A fire erupted in a trash chute inside the dome, but a National Guard commander said it did not affect the evacuation. After a traffic jam kept buses from arriving at the Superdome for nearly four hours, a near-riot broke out in the scramble to get on the buses that finally did show up.

Col. Henry Whitehorn, head of state police, said authorities are working on establishing a temporary jail to hold people accused of looting and other crimes. "These individuals will not take control of the city of New Orleans," he said.

The first of hundreds of busloads of people evacuated from the Superdome arrived early Thursday at their new temporary home _ another sports arena, the Houston Astrodome, 350 miles away.

But the ambulance service in charge of taking the sick and injured from the Superdome suspended flights after a shot was reported fired at a military helicopter. Richard Zuschlag, chief of Acadian Ambulance, said it was too dangerous for his pilots.

The military, which was overseeing the removal of the able-bodied by buses, continued the ground evacuation without interruption, said National Guard Lt. Col. Pete Schneider. The government had no immediate confirmation of whether a military helicopter was fired on.

Terry Ebbert, head of the city's emergency operations, warned that the slow evacuation at the Superdome had become an "incredibly explosive situation," and he bitterly complained that FEMA was not offering enough help.

"This is a national emergency. This is a national disgrace," he said. "FEMA has been here three days, yet there is no command and control. We can send massive amounts of aid to tsunami victims, but we can't bail out the city of New Orleans."

In Texas, the governor's office said Texas has agreed to take in an additional 25,000 refugees from Katrina and plans to house them in San Antonio, though exactly where has not been determined.

In Washington, the White House said President Bush will tour the devastated Gulf Coast region on Friday and has asked his father and former President Clinton to lead a private fund-raising campaign for victims.

The president urged a crackdown on the lawlessness.

"I think there ought to be zero tolerance of people breaking the law during an emergency such as this _ whether it be looting, or price gouging at the gasoline pump, or taking advantage of charitable giving or insurance fraud," Bush said. "And I've made that clear to our attorney general. The citizens ought to be working together."

On Wednesday, Mayor Ray Nagin offered the most startling estimate yet of the magnitude of the disaster: Asked how many people died in New Orleans, he said: "Minimum, hundreds. Most likely, thousands." The death toll has already reached at least 126 in Mississippi.

If the estimate proves correct, it would make Katrina the worst natural disaster in the United States since at least the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire, which was blamed for anywhere from about 500 to 6,000 deaths. Katrina would also be the nation's deadliest hurricane since 1900, when a storm in Galveston, Texas, killed between 6,000 and 12,000 people.

Nagin called for a total evacuation of New Orleans, saying the city had become uninhabitable for the 50,000 to 100,000 who remained behind after the city of nearly a half-million people was ordered cleared out over the weekend.

The mayor said that it will be two or three months before the city is functioning again and that people would not be allowed back into their homes for at least a month or two.

"We need an effort of 9-11 proportions," former New Orleans Mayor Marc Morial, now president of the Urban League, said on NBC's "Today" show.

"A great American city is fighting for its life," he added. "We must rebuild New Orleans, the city that gave us jazz, and music, and multiculturalism."

Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu toured the stricken areas said rescued people begged him to pass information to their families. His pocket was full of scraps of paper on which he had scribbled down their phone numbers.

When he got a working phone in the early morning hours Thursday, he contacted a woman whose father had been rescued and told her: "Your daddy's alive, and he said to tell you he loves you."

"She just started crying. She said, `I thought he was dead,'" he said.
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:29 AM   #176
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:29 AM   #177
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Originally posted by sulawesigirl4


I'm glad someone brought this up because I didn't want to be the one to say it. I know that people probably get tired of me harping on this, but since I am after all living in the middle of the poor, developing world, it is something I feel strongly about.

What you are seeing happen in NOLA is horrible. It shouldn't be happening. It goes against all of what we hold dear regarding human dignity and the value of a well-organized society.

But I hope that if anything it might help people realize the horrible realities of poverty. People all across the world live in chaos and filth and poverty like this on a daily basis. And there is little to no outcry. Sure, we all feel bad for the poor and hope that those folk in Africa will someday "advance" to our level and be able to "compete in the global marketplace" but from where I am standing, there are critical issues that have to be addressed on the ground. Things like clean water to drink and safe houses to live in, medical care to combat malaria and AIDS, basic education, and maternal care to combat the shocking amount of infant deaths and deaths of mothers during delivery....just to name a few.

No one said it would be easy and of course efforts to help have to be coordinated and properly managed, but the fact of the matter is that it is a disgrace to all of us who partake in the human race when our brothers and sisters are suffering in these conditions. People are people, no matter what color they are and no matter where they live. Maybe it is cheesy and simplistic, but I think that Bono was on to something. "Where you live should not decide whether you live or whether you die."
Yes.
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:34 AM   #178
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From the news coverage I've seen, I'm kind of off set by the how emotional the people are..........

unfortunately, I suppose this is a testament to the lack of leadership in the area. I can only hope the president can establish some things. But I don't think him showing up will do crap.


I guess I can only hope that someone steps it up and tries to keep order in the area. Calm it down.....


==============


I agree with you as well, sulawesigirl4
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:44 AM   #179
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Quote:
Originally posted by sulawesigirl4


I'm glad someone brought this up because I didn't want to be the one to say it. I know that people probably get tired of me harping on this, but since I am after all living in the middle of the poor, developing world, it is something I feel strongly about.

What you are seeing happen in NOLA is horrible. It shouldn't be happening. It goes against all of what we hold dear regarding human dignity and the value of a well-organized society.

But I hope that if anything it might help people realize the horrible realities of poverty. People all across the world live in chaos and filth and poverty like this on a daily basis. And there is little to no outcry. Sure, we all feel bad for the poor and hope that those folk in Africa will someday "advance" to our level and be able to "compete in the global marketplace" but from where I am standing, there are critical issues that have to be addressed on the ground. Things like clean water to drink and safe houses to live in, medical care to combat malaria and AIDS, basic education, and maternal care to combat the shocking amount of infant deaths and deaths of mothers during delivery....just to name a few.

No one said it would be easy and of course efforts to help have to be coordinated and properly managed, but the fact of the matter is that it is a disgrace to all of us who partake in the human race when our brothers and sisters are suffering in these conditions. People are people, no matter what color they are and no matter where they live. Maybe it is cheesy and simplistic, but I think that Bono was on to something. "Where you live should not decide whether you live or whether you die."
Yes, I'm sure that the people who are living this horrid nightmare will be able to empathize more with the Third World after all this. But unfortunately, these are not the people who are able to make a true change.
The government is.
And I doubt that they will learn from it and implement a new awereness in their foreign politics. Because that would mean they learn from the past and.....yeah that's right, they don't.
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:57 AM   #180
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Mrs Springsteeen, thats some stories..

pretty bad over there. I hope most of the people will get out soon. But its FOUR days they are inside of that chaos.. why doesn´t it work faster, one asks. Buses stuck in traffic, Helis geting fired at, what does the FEMA do in that case? Do they have zilch of plans?

And most important: How could it be that the dams broke? That the authorities were so incredibly stupid not to check and make them safe for whatever price it may cost?

In the Carribbean sea, 20 - yes TWENTY - oil platforms are MISSING. Apparently they can´t be found on satellite photos or I dont know what. Does one have to assume they have drowned, the oil lines that go deep down are opened, and there is gonna be an ecological disaster that we can´t see and realize as of yet? That the Carribbean sea will be covered in oil in the next 20 years? Is ANYTHING done about this at the moment?

Civilisation, civilisation... the traps of civilisation.
Nature, nature.. the power of nature.

Sometimes I have the feeling that nature just beats back. The tsunamis, global warmth, hurricanes etc. are the effects of the pollution we caused 20 years ago (contrary to what some experts that are apparently paid for their analysis say). One can only imagine the future.

Will people ever learn? I don´t think so. sorry to be negative, but do you think Bush will sign the international treaties now? I don´t think so. He has probably been busy cashing in with the ups and downs of oil prices, why not make some side money. Then Friday, lets make a little aero trip to see what´s up there. Uh, and let´s condemn the looters, after all we are brave Republicans and it´s so important to repeat that again and again. Why doesn´t this bag of shit who has the nerve to call himself President go into the Superdome? He was able to tell us great news from an aircraft carrier in Iraq, so why not here?

Most of the people in New Orleans were poor anyway. In the nespapers they write that most of those who were rich enough to own a car, fled the hurricane in time. The ones that got no transport had to stay there. Why wasnt massive evacuation planned for those people? It isn´t enough to warn and tell the people to leave the city. Because only the middle class and the richer folks could afford that.
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