MERGED--> all discussion of Israel/Lebanon conflict - Page 23 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind > Free Your Mind Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-25-2006, 02:09 AM   #331
Rock n' Roll Doggie
FOB
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 8,876
Local Time: 08:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by anitram


That is simply untrue - they continue to expand illegal settlements even today, as we speak. These are a clear provocation of the local Palestinian population.

Regarding Israel's will to resolve all issues as you claim:

Since when does David Ben Gurion speak for all Israely's assuming thats even an accurate qoute?

FACT: The Jews living in Israel/Palestine had every right to form their own state when the Ottoman Empire disolved and came to an end. This had been Ottoman land for the previous 400 years. Any of the ethnic groups or nationalities present on the land at the time had every right to form their own independent states on the land they were living on.

30 years after the end of World War I and the end of the Ottoman Empire, Israel became an independent state. The United Nations partition plan offered a Palestinian State as well in 1948, but the Palestinians and the Arabs rejected the plan and attacked Israel on the day of its independence in an attempt to wipe it off the face of the map. Despite being aided by 5 Arab countries, the Palestinians and their Arab allies were defeated. For the next 58 years, Israel would come under invasions and attacks as well as terrorism.

Despite all this, the Israely's offered the Palestinians 95% of what they wanted in the late 90s peace plan. 50 years after the Palestinians rejected an opportunity for an independent state, they rejected this one as well, despite getting 95% of what they asked for!!!

Israel offered Syria 99% of the Golan Heights, but the Syrians rejected the offer!

Israel withdrew from Lebanon in 2000, the result, 6 years of a Hezbollah military build up which has led to the rocketing of Israely towns and violations and incursions into Israely territory.

The same with Gaza, Israel withdraws unilaterally without conditions, and what do the Palestinians do, they launch new attacks on Israel.


These are the examples of Israel's desire to negotiate. Where is the Palestinian or Arab desire among those in the West Bank, Gaza, Lebanon, and Syria to negotiate with Israel? 58 years of terrorism and brutallity towards Israel plus rejection of EVERY peace plan and land partition plan from 1948 right up to today is the answer!

The settlements are irrelevant and can be dismantled and the people taken out, just as Israel did in the Sinai in the late 1970s, and in Gaza just recently.
__________________

__________________
STING2 is offline  
Old 07-25-2006, 03:18 AM   #332
Rock n' Roll Doggie
FOB
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 8,876
Local Time: 08:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by trevster2k


I think for myself and other critics is the nature of the casualties along with the numbers. Many of them have been children, and a few have been targeted by gunships meaning human decisions were involved in attacking the target, i.e the bus, and minivan I do think that there is a small number of Israeli military who are not acting in self-defense but out of vengeance. They are human beings and of course, most are trying to do the best job they can.But a tiny percentage, just as in the any military, are perhaps overstepping their bounds in targeting different objects. That's my take. And I think this is something that the IDF has to reel in and control.

Regarding the buffer zone, yes, it could be effective but this is how Syria gained a foothold in Lebanon in the first place. Who is willing to step into the line of fire to maintain the buffer? Israel has stated it would accept NATO but would the Lebanese, would Hezbelloh? It would provide a temporary solution at best in my mind. And it could open a whole new can of worms and the region could be destablized again.

I agree that this is an ongoing dilemma which stretches back many many years. But for the average person watching the news, all they know is the recent events of the past month. Israel has overlooked Hezbelloh over the past few years and Hezbelloh took advantage by arming itself to the teeth. So I think that is conflict is something bigger than what they are claiming it to be. Initially, the position of Israel was return the soldiers but that is off the table. Now it is the disarming of Hezbelloh. With that as a goal, I don't see how this present turn of events can end without the total destruction of many parts of Lebanon including Beirut. And the scariest thing is that Hezbelloh will just move its' operations somewhere else.

I think in Lebanon's case specifically, the people did recently support a different leadership in the hope of a better future of peace and prosperity. Except they couldn't control the southern regions of Lebanon where Hezbelloh had a strong foothold. Unfortunately, that little bit of hope growing in Lebanon is now extinguished and I don't see it leading to more peace. Like many people who live in regions constantly besieged by war, the Lebanese are very resilent. But their frustration, sadness and disappointment will be directed somewhere in the coming years. Will be towards Hezbelloh or Israel? Time will tell, I guess.

I don't think comparisons between Israel and the Arab nations in the surrounding region based on GDP and prosperity is entirely fair. There is no doubt that Israel is in the good graces of the US and this helps their economy greatly. Not that it is a bad thing,it's just that it is a huge advantage to have favoured status with the US. Canada benefits greatly also along with many other nations. Syria and Lebanon, not so favoured.Which makes it increasing difficult to accelerate the growth of an economy when the biggest trading partner in the world frowns upon your nation. Many people in Gaza and the West Bank are still considered refugees depending on international support which again affects economic production.

Sting, thanks for this exchange. I just hope this whole turn of events ends quickly and people can return to their lives albeit not under the best circumstances for either peoples but to some level of normality.
What evidence do you have that shows that ANYONE in the IDF over the past 14 days has stopped working on the military operation they were doing order to target and murder civilians? Military strikes are done based on intelligence. Israel has no desire to waste military resources on targets that have no impact on their mission and goals, and will only serve the propaganda purposes of those that want to destroy Israel, or always find Israel at fault.

For Israel, the situation is unstable, and regardless of whether or not a settlement is reached or a Buffer zone is set up with NATO troops taking control, Israel is going to remove the Rocket threat to its nothern towns period. If the Lebanese and Hezbollah will not accept a NATO force or another multi-national force of some type in southern Lebanon, then they will probably have the IDF in Southern Lebanon.

Perhaps Hezbollah and the Lebanese, assuming their really serious about having peace, should take a look at what NATO has done for Bosnia, in particular BOSNIAN MUSLIMS. What did they or their Arab brother do from 1992-1995 while 300,000 Muslims were massacred in Bosnia? It was the "Great Satan" that saved the Muslims in Bosnia from further slaughter. Look at the peace that has come to Bosnia as a result of NATO actions. U2's POPMART concert tour came to the capital and the quality of life in the country has dramatically improved from the war years. Once again, the opportunity for peace is here, the question is do those that are in and support Hezbollah want it? Do they want U2 concerts, peace, prosperity a real future, or do they prefer a crap standard of living, no progress and endless war with a country they cannot defeat nor stop from its continual advancement into the future?

How often does Hezbollah launch strikes against Israel from Syrian or Jordanian territory? They don't because the governments in those countries would never stand for it and would use military force to prevent it, unless of course they were interested in war with Israel. So no, Hezbollah can't just pick up and go anywhere. The fact is Lebanon has no control over its territory. Hezbollah is essentially running the show and Hezbollah has declared war on Israel. Israel has no choice but to defend itself. They can't just let Hezbollah grow in size and capability in order to kill Israely citizens and threaten their security. If someone was launching rockets into your neighborhood, how do you think the Police or Military in your area would respond? Think about it, Israel is trying to remove the rocket threat to its northern towns. Can you name another country that would not do the same or at least attempt to if thousands of rockets were being fired into their towns to murder their citizens?

There is a UN resolution calling for the disarmament of Hezbollah, so rather than being something only Israel has called for, this is something that the United Nations has called for. Hezbollah is not the lawful government or military of Lebanon, but that is essentially what they have become over the years, despite the success's in rebuilding a legitimate government in Beirut recently.

The Labanese may direct their anger toward Israel, but history shows that will accomplish nothing. It will not improve their lives or change the situation for them. The problem is Hezbollah and if they decide to support it or are not willing to help take action to stop them, their situation will only get worse. Israel is not going away, their not going to stop defending itself. They have what they want and will do anything to protect it. After 58 years, the people are going to have to realize that Israel is not the problem, Hezbollah and anyone that supports terrorism are the problem. Notice that most Arab governments have condemned Hezbollah and pointed the finger at them for starting this.

Actually the GDP and standard of living comparisons are very revealing. Take a look at Egypt. What few people realize is that the United States actually sends as much or more aid to Egypt than it does Israel. But once again, look at the differences in standard of living. Israel has no oil like the Gulf States do, yet Israel ranks higher than a country like Kuwait in Standard of Living. In addition, the sell of US military hardware to Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, UAE, and Turkey, greatly exceeds US military sales to Israel.

Israel actually produces nearly all of its military hardware for its ground forces. It builds one of the best tanks in the world, the Merkava, and has actually been an innovator in armor design for vehicles for decades now. Israel invented reactive armor which was later used by the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact as well as by US and NATO countries.

Israel has a $160 Billion dollar economy of which US foreign aid is only a fraction. Israely imports from the United States only account for 18% of its total imports. 36% of Israely exports do go to the United States, but that leaves 64% of their exports going to other countries.

Israel is far from being the dependent country that so many make it out to be.

Hezbollah is much stronger and more entrenched then many people thought it was just a year ago. Unless Hezbollah is disarmed or in some way changes its behavior, then the fighting is going to continue. The ultimate solution is the disarmament of Hezbollah and the establishment of a Lebanese government and military that has full control of its internal security situation. There are several ways those goals can be achieved, and the willingness of Hezbollah to get out of the terrorism and military business would go a long way to speed up the process. Israel has no choice but to continue to defend its security and the Lebanese, and world community need to find a way to resolve the key problem which is the inability for any government in Beirut to exercise any real control over its territory.
__________________

__________________
STING2 is offline  
Old 07-25-2006, 06:20 PM   #333
Blue Crack Addict
 
joyfulgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 16,615
Local Time: 01:40 AM
Here is a beautiful article written by the fantastic journalist Robert Fisk who has lived in Beirut for the last 30 years. I hope it's okay to post the whole article--it's pretty long and I just don't know if people really click on those links and read entire articles when just a blurb is posted and my hope is that everyone will read it (and I promise not to make a habit of posting lengthy articles here).

Published on Sunday, July 23, 2006 by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer (Washington)

The Empire Leaves Beirut to Burn
by Robert Fisk

In the year 551, the magnificent, wealthy city of Berytus -- headquarters of the imperial East Mediterranean Roman fleet -- was struck by a massive earthquake. Then, the sea withdrew several miles and the survivors, ancestors of the present-day Lebanese, walked out on the sands to loot the long-sunken merchant ships revealed in front of them.

That was when a tidal wall higher than a tsunami returned to kill them all. So savagely was the old Beirut damaged that the Emperor Justinian sent gold from Constantinople as compensation to every family left alive.

Some cities seem forever doomed. When the Crusaders arrived at Beirut on their way to Jerusalem in the 11th century, they slaughtered everyone in the city. In World War I, Ottoman Beirut suffered a terrible famine; the Turkish army had commandeered all the grain, and the Allied powers blockaded the coast. I still have some ancient postcards I bought here 30 years ago of sticklike children standing in an orphanage, naked and abandoned.

An American woman living in Beirut in 1916 described how she "passed women and children lying by the roadside with closed eyes and ghastly, pale faces. It was a common thing to find people searching the garbage heaps for orange peel, old bones or other refuse, and eating them greedily when found. Everywhere women could be seen seeking eatable weeds among the grass along the roads ... "

How does this happen to Beirut? For 30 years, I've watched this place die and rise from the grave and die again, its apartment blocks pitted with so many bullets they looked like Irish lace.

I lived here through 15 years of civil war that took 150,000 lives, and two Israeli invasions and years of Israeli bombardments that cost the lives of a further 20,000 of its people. I have seen them armless, legless, headless, knifed, bombed and splashed across the walls of houses. Yet they are a fine, educated, moral people whose generosity amazes every foreigner, whose gentleness puts any Westerner to shame, and whose suffering we almost always ignore.

They look like us, the people of Beirut. They have light-colored skin and speak beautiful English and French. They travel the world. Their women are gorgeous and their food exquisite. But what are we saying of their fate today as the Israelis -- in some of their cruelest attacks on this city and the surrounding countryside -- tear them from their homes, bomb them on river bridges, cut them off from food and water and electricity? We say they started this latest war, and we compare their appalling casualties -- 240 in all of Lebanon at the start of last week -- with Israel's 24 dead, as if the figures are the same.

And then, most disgraceful of all, we leave the Lebanese to their fate like a diseased people and spend our time evacuating our precious foreigners while tut-tutting about Israel's "disproportionate" response to the capture of its soldiers by Hezbollah.

I walked through the deserted city center of Beirut last week and it reminded more than ever of a film lot, a place of dreams too beautiful to last, a phoenix from the ashes of civil war whose plumage was so brightly colored that it blinded its own people. This part of the city -- once a Dresden of ruins -- was rebuilt by Rafiq Hariri, the prime minister who was murdered a mile away last year.

The wreckage of that bomb blast, an awful precursor to the present war in which his inheritance is being vandalized by the Israelis, still stands beside the Mediterranean, waiting for the last U.N. investigator to look for clues.

At the empty Etoile restaurant -- where Hariri once dined with Jacques Chirac -- I sat on the pavement and watched the parliamentary guard still patrolling the facade of the French-built emporium that houses what is left of Lebanon's democracy. So many of these streets were built by Parisians under the French mandate, and they have been exquisitely restored, their mock Arabian doorways bejeweled with marble Roman columns dug from the ancient Via Maxima a few meters away.

Hariri loved this place and, taking Chirac for a beer one day, he caught sight of me sitting at a table. "Ah, Robert, come over here," he roared and turned to Chirac like a cat that was about to eat a canary. "I want to introduce you, Jacques, to the reporter who said I couldn't rebuild Beirut!"

Now it is being unbuilt. The Martyr Rafiq Hariri International Airport has been attacked several times by the Israelis, its glistening halls and shopping malls vibrating to the missiles that thunder into the runways and fuel depots. Hariri's wonderful transnational highway viaduct has been broken by Israeli bombers. Most of his motorway bridges have been destroyed. The Roman-style lighthouse has been smashed by a missile from an Apache helicopter. This small jewel of a restaurant in the center of Beirut has been spared. So far.

It is the slums of Haret Hreik and Ghobeiri and Shiyah that have been leveled and "rubble-ized" and pounded to dust, sending a quarter of a million Shiite Muslims to seek sanctuary in schools and abandoned parks across the city. Here, indeed, was the headquarters of Hezbollah, another of those "centers of world terror" that the West keeps discovering in Muslim lands. Here lived Sayed Hassan Nasrallah, the Party of God's leader, a ruthless, caustic, calculating man; and Sayad Mohamed Fadlallah, among the wisest and most eloquent of clerics; and many of Hezbollah's top military planners -- including, no doubt, the men who planned over many months the capture of the two Israeli soldiers 10 days ago.

But did the tens of thousands of poor who live here deserve this act of mass punishment? For a country that boasts of its pinpoint accuracy -- a doubtful notion in any case, but that's not the issue -- what does this act of destruction tell us about Israel? Or about ourselves?

In a modern building in an undamaged part of Beirut, I come, quite by chance, across a well-known and prominent Hezbollah figure, open-neck white shirt, dark suit, clean shoes. "We will go on if we have to for days or weeks or months or ... " And he counts these awful statistics off on the fingers of his left hand. "Believe me, we have bigger surprises still to come for the Israelis -- much bigger, you will see. Then we will get our prisoners and it will take just a few small concessions."

I walk outside, feeling as if I have been beaten over the head. Over the wall opposite there is purple bougainvillea and white jasmine and a swamp of gardenias. The Lebanese love flowers, and Beirut is draped in trees and bushes that smell like paradise.

As for the huddled masses from the bombed-out southern slums of Haret Hreik, I found hundreds yesterday, sitting under trees and lying on the parched grass beside an ancient fountain donated by the Ottoman Sultan Abdul-Hamid. How empires fall.

Across the Mediterranean, two helicopters from the USS Iwo Jima could be seen, heading through the mist and smoke toward the U.S. embassy bunker complex at Awkar to evacuate more citizens of the American Empire. There was not a word from that same empire to help the people lying in the park, to offer them food or medical aid.

Across them all has spread a dark gray smoke that works its way through the entire city, the fires of oil terminals and burning buildings turning into a cocktail of sulphurous air that moves below our doors and through our windows. I smell it when I wake. Half the people of Beirut are coughing in this filth, breathing their own destruction as they contemplate their dead.

The anger that any human soul should feel at such suffering and loss was expressed so well by Lebanon's greatest poet, the mystic Khalil Gibran, when he wrote of the half million Lebanese who died in the 1916 famine, most of them residents of Beirut:

My people died of hunger, and he who
Did not perish from starvation was
Butchered with the sword;
They perished from hunger
In a land rich with milk and honey.
They died because the vipers and
Sons of vipers spat out poison into
The space where the Holy Cedars and
The roses and the jasmine breathe
Their fragrance.

And the sword continues to cut its way through Beirut. When part of an aircraft came streaking out of the sky over the eastern suburbs at the weekend, I raced to the scene to find a partly decapitated driver in his car and three Lebanese soldiers from the army's logistics unit. These are the tough, brave non-combat soldiers of Kfar Chim who have been mending power and water lines these past six days to keep Beirut alive.

I knew one of them. "Hello, Robert. Be quick because I think the Israelis will bomb again, but we'll show you everything we can." And they took me through the fires to show me what they could of the wreckage, standing around to protect me.

A few hours later, the Israelis did come back, as the men of the small logistics unit were going to bed, and they bombed the barracks and killed 10 soldiers, including those three kind men who looked after me amid the fires of Kfar Chim.

And why? Be sure -- the Israelis know what they are hitting. That's why they killed nine soldiers near Tripoli when they bombed the military radio antennas. But a logistics unit? Men whose sole job was to mend electricity lines? Then it dawns on me. Beirut is to die. It is to be starved of electricity now that the power station in Jiyeh is on fire. No one is to be allowed to keep Beirut alive. So those men had to be liquidated.

Beirutis are tough people and are not easily moved. But at the end of last week, many of them were overcome by a photograph in their daily papers of a small girl, discarded like a broken flower in a field near Ter Harfa, her feet curled up, her hand resting on her torn blue pajamas, her eyes -- beneath long, soft hair -- closed, turned away from the camera. She had been another "terrorist" target of Israel and several people, myself among them, saw a frightening similarity between this picture and the photograph of a Polish girl lying dead in a field beside her weeping sister in 1939.

I go home and flick through my files, old pictures of the Israeli invasion of 1982. There are more photographs of dead children, of broken bridges. Yes, how easily we forget these earlier slaughters. Up to 1,700 Palestinians were butchered at Sabra and Chatila by Israel's proxy Christian militia allies in 1982 while Israeli troops, as they later testified to Israel's own court of inquiry, watched the killings. I stopped counting the corpses when I reached 100. Many of the women had been raped before being knifed or shot.

Yet when I was fleeing the bombing of Ghobeiri with my driver, Abed, a week before last, we swept right past the entrance of the camp, the very spot where I saw the first murdered Palestinians. And we did not think of them. We did not remember them. They were dead in Beirut and we were trying to stay alive in Beirut, as I have been trying to stay alive here for 30 years.

I am back on the seacoast when my mobile phone rings. It is an Israeli woman calling me from the United States, the author of a fine novel about the Palestinians. "Robert, please take care," she says. "I am so, so sorry about what is being done to the Lebanese. It is unforgivable. I pray for the Lebanese people, and the Palestinians, and the Israelis." I thank her for her thoughtfulness and the graceful, generous way she condemned this slaughter.

Then, on my balcony -- a glance to check the location of the Israeli gunboat far out in the sea-smog -- I find older clippings. This is from an English paper in 1840, when Beirut was a great Ottoman city. "Beyrouth" was the dateline. "Anarchy is now the order of the day, our properties and personal safety are endangered, no satisfaction can be obtained, and crimes are committed with impunity. Several Europeans have quitted their houses and suspended their affairs, in order to find protection in more peaceable countries."

On my dining-room wall, I remember, there is a hand-painted lithograph of French troops arriving in Beirut in 1842 to protect the Christian Maronites from the Druze. They are camping in the Jardin des Pins, which will later become the site of the French embassy where, only a few hours ago, I saw French men and women registering for their evacuation. Outside the window, I hear again the whisper of Israeli jets, hidden behind the smoke that drifts 20 miles out to sea.

Fairouz, the most popular Lebanese singer, was to perform at this year's Baalbek festival, cancelled like all Lebanon's festivals. One of her most popular songs is dedicated to her native city:

To Beirut -- peace to Beirut with all my heart
And kisses -- to the sea and clouds,
To the rock of a city that looks like an old sailor's face.
From the soul of her people she makes wine,
From their sweat, she makes bread and jasmine.
So how did it come to taste of smoke and fire?

Robert Fisk, who writes for The Independent of Britain, has lived in Beirut 30 years.
__________________
joyfulgirl is offline  
Old 07-25-2006, 10:18 PM   #334
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: London/Sydney
Posts: 6,608
Local Time: 09:40 AM
Mr Annan described the strike as a "co-ordinated artillery and aerial attack on a long established and clearly marked UN post."

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is an interesting situation. What does Israel do here? If they say it was an accident it opens the door to justifying all claims that Israel either is not targetting correctly or not giving a fuck. It legitimises much or most of the argument against Israels course of action. If Israel say it was deliberate...

I guess they just "open a thorough investigation" that lasts so long that everyone forgets? I don't think there's a chance they'll be left alone to ignore it.
__________________
Earnie Shavers is offline  
Old 07-25-2006, 11:08 PM   #335
Rock n' Roll Doggie
FOB
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 8,876
Local Time: 08:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Earnie Shavers
Mr Annan described the strike as a "co-ordinated artillery and aerial attack on a long established and clearly marked UN post."

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is an interesting situation. What does Israel do here? If they say it was an accident it opens the door to justifying all claims that Israel either is not targetting correctly or not giving a fuck. It legitimises much or most of the argument against Israels course of action. If Israel say it was deliberate...

I guess they just "open a thorough investigation" that lasts so long that everyone forgets? I don't think there's a chance they'll be left alone to ignore it.
Why would Israel target a UN observation posts? There is no evidence that they did target it, and it clearly is an obvious mistake. Remember, the IDF has hit its own troops in the past. Friendly Fire is indeed a hazard in any military operation.
__________________
STING2 is offline  
Old 07-25-2006, 11:19 PM   #336
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: London/Sydney
Posts: 6,608
Local Time: 09:40 AM
I don't think they did target it, nor do I think they hit civilians without the greatest care to avoid them. However, the whole right/wrong, PR debate is entirely based on Israeli targeting. Here they have blown up a UN post, in error. It's not a small story. It will be a flashpoint for the debate. All I'm saying is that it will be interesting to see how it will play out, and I've noticed since I posted that the Israeli's have indeed launched an investigation.
__________________
Earnie Shavers is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 03:34 AM   #337
Blue Crack Addict
 
deep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: A far distance down.
Posts: 28,501
Local Time: 12:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by STING2


Why would Israel target a UN observation posts?
The U N has been critical of Israel's tactics.

They did not want the UN observing Israeli War Crimes.
__________________
deep is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 05:59 AM   #338
Refugee
 
all_i_want's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,180
Local Time: 11:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by STING2





Once again, the opportunity for peace is here, the question is do those that are in and support Hezbollah want it? Do they want U2 concerts, peace, prosperity a real future, or do they prefer a crap standard of living, no progress and endless war with a country they cannot defeat nor stop from its continual advancement into the future?

I have a friend who is part Lebanese, he goes to Beirut every once in a while, and that city does not offer a crap standard of living. Of course, when it is not being bombarded.
__________________
all_i_want is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 09:29 AM   #339
Blue Crack Addict
 
nbcrusader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Southern California
Posts: 22,071
Local Time: 12:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by STING2
Why would Israel target a UN observation posts?
With UN "peace keeping" forces in Southern Lebanon for years, were they not complicit with Hezbollah's military build up in the area?
__________________
nbcrusader is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 11:55 AM   #340
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 30,492
Local Time: 03:40 AM
[q]In the past two weeks, more Iraqi civilians have been killed than have died in Lebanon and Israel.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/26/wo...on&oref=slogin

[/q]
__________________
Irvine511 is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 01:03 PM   #341
Blue Crack Addict
 
nbcrusader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Southern California
Posts: 22,071
Local Time: 12:40 AM
Hell From the Heavens

Quote:
At dawn on January 31 this year, Lebanese Army troops stopped a suspicious convoy of 12 trucks trying to cross the border from Syria. Inside, they found tons of unauthorized ammunition, rockets, and other weapons. The convoy's final destination: the arms caches of Hezbollah, the radical Islamic political movement whose militia controls wide swaths of southern and eastern Lebanon. A series of phone calls followed, reportedly reaching the Lebanese prime minister's office, until, finally, the convoy was allowed on its way.

The incident was but a glimpse of a vast supply train running from Iranian arms factories and Syrian warehouses to Hezbollah, whose burgeoning arsenal has prompted Israel's offensive into Lebanon this month. For a quarter century, Hezbollah's backers in Tehran have poured arms, money, and men into the group, helping transform it from a ragtag guerrilla force into one of the world's most formidable militias. Interviews with military and intelligence experts suggest that Hezbollah stands almost alone among groups on the U.S. terrorism list. "This is not merely a terrorist group," says Brig. Gen. Michael Herzog, who served as chief of strategic planning for the Israel Defense Forces. "This is a military."
__________________
nbcrusader is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 01:09 PM   #342
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 30,492
Local Time: 03:40 AM
Iran grows stronger and stronger with each passing day.
__________________
Irvine511 is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 02:10 PM   #343
Blue Crack Addict
 
nbcrusader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Southern California
Posts: 22,071
Local Time: 12:40 AM
Ahmadinejad Calls for Lebanon Cease-Fire

Quote:
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad called for a cease-fire in Lebanon and criticized U.S. policy in the Middle East on Wednesday, saying Washington wants to "recarve the map" of the region with Israel's help.

Ahmadinejad's nation is a major backer of Hezbollah and a sworn enemy of Israel, but he denied that Tehran provides military support to the militant group.


Ahmadinejad's call for a cease fire is really a request to resupply and reload.
__________________
nbcrusader is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 02:15 PM   #344
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 30,492
Local Time: 03:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by nbcrusader
Ahmadinejad Calls for Lebanon Cease-Fire





Ahmadinejad's call for a cease fire is really a request to resupply and reload.


or a perfect way to try to improve Iran's "credibility" as the regions foremost military and political power.

Shiite crescent, anyone?
__________________
Irvine511 is offline  
Old 07-26-2006, 02:33 PM   #345
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
Justin24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Mateo
Posts: 6,716
Local Time: 01:40 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by deep

The U N has been critical of Israel's tactics.

They did not want the UN observing Israeli War Crimes.
What about the War crimes of Hizbolla since they are considered a government party.
__________________

__________________
Justin24 is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com