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Old 11-12-2006, 03:02 PM   #31
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So let me understand the logic...I cannot think it great that htis happened if I did not vote for him?

I just do not understand why my voting for him would negate any respect, admiration, excitement over something historical.
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Old 11-12-2006, 03:15 PM   #32
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I was just wondering, given your respect, admiration and excitement, why you didn't vote for him, or why you thought someone else was more worth voting. Not criticizing you, all I've been doing in asking you this is trying to get you to tell me why you thought he wasn't worth voting for? It's an honestly curious question, I'm not trying to be disrespectful.
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Old 11-13-2006, 02:35 PM   #33
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Um unless you live in back bay (where there is a star market in the pru) there are plenty of supermarkets all over Boston, where I live. (I assume thats what you mean by city as I am a Boston snob and I don't consider anywhere else a real city...sorry Tim Murray.) Boston is in a bind as we have hit our liquor lisence cap in some areas and are about to in others and the prices have shot up. This would allow anotehr liquor lisence for every 5000 residents. It not only benefit people in Wayland but would benefit people in the suburbs that are in lower economic brackets - Randolph, Quincy, etc. Further, if you look at where supermarkets currently concentrate their 3 statewide lisences, you see Wholefoods selling in Cambridge and Stop and Shop in Quincy - what kind of alcohol is being catered to these communities where the stores choose to use their 3 lisences is an interesting socioeconomic converstation as wel. But I dont think that was the point of the question; it was about whether we should join practically every other state in allowing supermarkets to sell alcohol. I believe that opening a market like this can only be good, that it's a bit of bullshit that it will increase drunk driving (ironically this was propogated by the packies), and that wine is good for your health . Voting against this because you think people are too lazy is exactly the reason ballot questions are ridiculous - people deciding issues without thinking through the facts and why we have laws in the first place - clue: not to make judgements about laziness.
I think you read too much in to my post. All I said was that the result didn't affect me. How you know which supermarkets are within walking distance to where I live is beyong me. I realize that I am partly to blame for the post being misinterpreted.I guess I was reacting to blaming the "damn Puritans" for the result of question 1. The people I know that voted no are not "damn Puritans", nor were they swayed by the negative ad campaigns stating that there would be an increased number of drunk drivers on the road and that teenagers would have easier access to alcohol. There were other reasons to vote no. Besides, what does the term "Puritan" mean anymore? Is it even relevant now? As for thinking that one stop shopping makes people lazy, it's my opinion. Judgemental? I suppose. Did it influence my vote? No. In fact, I never even said which way I had voted. Maybe I misinterpreted the last part of your post, but as for implying that people don't think issues through because they may not have voted the same way as you, well, that's a little harsh and unfair.
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Old 11-13-2006, 05:30 PM   #34
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I am not saying people didnt think issues through becasue they didn't vote like I did; in fact I don't think I was qualified to vote on question 3 which was ridiculously confusing. I think that we elect representatives to study issues and make laws for us - and if they do a bad job we can unelect them the next time around. I think "people are lazy" is a bad reason to vote agaisnt a question, but there are plenty of legitimate reasons to vote agaisnt question 1 including the murkiness surrounding whether or not it will increase drunk driving.

Puritan to me is a descriptor of the Blue Laws in MA, PA and other states. They exist because of the Puritan origins of the states' original lawmakers and are just now being taken off the books. I meant it was a joke, not to offend, and I intended it to be aimed at the state's founders (many of them great men).

So I guess you read too much into my post too.
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Old 11-13-2006, 07:20 PM   #35
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Puritan to me is a descriptor of the Blue Laws in MA, PA and other states. They exist because of the Puritan origins of the states' original lawmakers and are just now being taken off the books. I meant it was a joke, not to offend, and I intended it to be aimed at the state's founders (many of them great men).
ANd I would argue that the blue laws made my childhood a better one. I was guarenteed a day that I could see both of my parents together.

And I voted against allowing wine to be sold in liquor stores.

So I guess if that makes me a puritain...so be it.
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Old 11-13-2006, 08:46 PM   #36
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Originally posted by Varitek
I am not saying people didnt think issues through becasue they didn't vote like I did; in fact I don't think I was qualified to vote on question 3 which was ridiculously confusing. I think that we elect representatives to study issues and make laws for us - and if they do a bad job we can unelect them the next time around. I think "people are lazy" is a bad reason to vote agaisnt a question, but there are plenty of legitimate reasons to vote agaisnt question 1 including the murkiness surrounding whether or not it will increase drunk driving.

Puritan to me is a descriptor of the Blue Laws in MA, PA and other states. They exist because of the Puritan origins of the states' original lawmakers and are just now being taken off the books. I meant it was a joke, not to offend, and I intended it to be aimed at the state's founders (many of them great men).

So I guess you read too much into my post too.
"people are lazy " did not influence my vote. Perhaps you missed that part of my post. but let's not beat a dead horse.
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Old 01-04-2007, 04:24 PM   #37
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His inauguration was today. I like the history of that Bible.

Here's his speech

"We meet today on a singular occasion. More than the passing of title and honor, more than the ritual transfer of the power of government -- this is the occasion when the people charge new leadership to steward the public trust. It is a profound responsibility. I accept it humbly, mindful of the history that brought us here, and the challenges before us.

For a very long time now we have been told that government is bad, that it exists only to serve the powerful and well-connected, that its job is not important enough to be done by anyone competent, let alone committed, and that all of us are on our own. Today we join together in common cause to lay that fallacy to rest, and to extend a great movement based on shared responsibility from the corner office to the corner of your block and back again.

My journey here has been an improbable one. From a place where hope withers, through great schools and challenging opportunities, to this solemn occasion, I have been supported and loved and lifted up. And I thank the family, the mentors, the teachers – every one of whom is here today in body or in spirit – just as I thank the tens of thousands of campaign volunteers and millions of voters across the Commonwealth who shared this improbable journey with me.

But really America herself is an improbable journey. People have come to these shores from all over the world, in all manner of boats, and built from a wilderness one of the most remarkable societies in human history. We are most remarkable not just for our material accomplishments or military might, but because of the ideals to which we have dedicated ourselves. We have defined those ideals over time and through struggle as equality, opportunity and fair play – ideals about universal human dignity. For these, at the end of the day, we are an envy to the world.

Massachusetts invented America. American ideals were first spoken here, first dreamed about here. Our constitution is the oldest, and one of the most explicit about individual freedoms. Our legislature is the longest continuously operating democratic body on the face of the earth. In so many ways, our struggle, our sacrifice, our optimism shaped the institutions and advanced the ideals of this Nation.

Our founders came on the Mayflower, the Arabella, and the early clipper ships. But there were other boats, too. There was the Amistad and her cargo of kidnapped Africans, who commandeered the ship to sail home to Africa, but who were seized in Long Island Sound and imprisoned in New Haven.

On this very day 165 years ago, a young man named Kinna, who had been part of that rebellion, sent a letter from prison to our own John Quincy Adams, who had retired from public life at home in Massachusetts.

Kinna pleaded with Adams to help the 36 captives from his ship to earn their freedom. Adams took the case all the way to the United States Supreme Court and won.

As a gesture of thanks and respect, the Africans gave Adams a Bible, called the Mendi Bible, after their tribal homeland.

I took the oath this morning with my hand resting on that same Bible -- and with my resolve strengthened by that same legacy. I am descended from people once forbidden their most basic and fundamental freedoms, a people desperate for a reason to hope and willing to fight for it. And so are you. So are you. Because the Amistad was not just a Black man’s journey; it was an American journey. This Commonwealth – and the Nation modeled on it – is at its best when we show we understand a faith in what’s possible, and the willingness to work for it.

So, as an American, I am an optimist. But not a foolish one. I see clearly the challenges before us.

I see the young talent and jobs leaving our state, driven away by the high cost of housing.

I see the poor in terrible shape, and the middle class one month away from being poor.

I see the heroin in the cities and the OxyContin in the suburbs, destroying families with cold indifference to class and status.

I see the way the public schools too often fail poor kids and how the cost of public colleges is pushing young people out.

I see the broken roads and bridges, the soaring health care costs, the high property taxes, the violence in our streets.

But I also see the creativity of our universities.

I also see the ingenuity of our industries.

I also see the skill of our hospitals, the inspiration of our artists.

And I see above all the imagination, the compassion and the energy of our people.

I see what we are capable of – not just as a matter of history, but as a matter of character.

And I am asking you to touch that part of our shared legacy, and reach with me for something better.

I know that we can have more and better jobs, and a stronger economy. But we will need the best prepared workforce on the planet, simpler and faster regulatory processes, a stable and simplified corporate tax structure, and a more cooperative relationship between labor and business. Let’s reach for that.

I know we can have better schools to support that emerging economy, and to prepare today’s and tomorrow’s citizens. But we will need high expectations for our kids at home as well as at schools, more flexibility in the classrooms and even in what we consider to be a “classroom,” early education and after-school programs, and public colleges and universities every bit as well-supported and honored as their private counterparts. Let’s reach for that.

I know we can have more accessible and more affordable health care for ourselves and our families. But it will take transparency among clinicians and health insurers, a system of care that makes more use of community settings, simplified administrative systems, and government stewardship for the whole for the good of the whole. Let’s reach for that.

I know we can have safer neighborhoods. But it will take more community-based patrols, after-school and enrichment programs, summer job and volunteer opportunities for young people, training and pre-release preparation for inmates, and sensible reform of both CORI and sentencing. Let’s reach for that.

We know what to do. We know that our challenges were long in the making and will require long-term solutions. We know what to reach for. And we ought to know that either we invest today or we will surely pay excessively tomorrow. An investment in education today beats an investment in prisons tomorrow. We know that. Let's reach for that.

Quick fixes, gimmicks and sound bites are not enough. That’s not in the spirit of what built this country. That is not what cleared the forest and planted New England’s earliest farms. It’s not what inspired our great universities and museums. It’s not what created the boom in textile manufacturing in its time or a flourishing biotech industry today. It’s not what freed the colonies from oppression or the slaves from bondage or women from second class citizenship.

What has distinguished us at every signature moment of our history is a willingness to look a challenge right in the eye, the instinct to measure it against our ideals, and the sustained dedication to close the gap between the two. That is who we are.

We will need different tools and different approaches, ones for our times. As your governor, I have broad responsibility for what goes right and what goes wrong, but far less authority than I need to influence the course of either. For that reason, I will reorganize the executive branch, to simplify our systems, to make it more modern and accessible and accountable, to enable our public employees to concentrate on the public service at the core of their assignments, and to enable your governor to advance the agenda you elected me to do.

I will ask municipalities to enter into a new partnership with state government, so that we can work together to reduce their operating costs, to better plan across regions, and to rebuild city and town centers into stronger economic cores.

And I will be calling on you each one of you to stay engaged, to bring forward your solutions, not just your problems, to suggest a better way, to keep your eye on the higher ground we seek, and to act like you understand that this State House is your House. You stood up, and you reached out, from every corner of the Commonwealth, working together in the best example in recent memory of a bedrock democratic principle: that to make any difference in our common realities, we must see our stake in each others’ dreams and struggles as well as our own, and act on that.

My point is that we will be doing some things differently. Moving today’s rituals within reach of you is symbolic of that. Change is not always comfortable or convenient or welcome. But it is what we hoped for, what we have worked for, what you voted for, and what you shall have.

I got a letter from a woman in Worcester named Stacy Amaral a few weeks ago. She told me how she – like my own mother -- had raised two children on her own, now both grown and doing well. Stacy now helps care for her mother, a frail 82-year-old woman of just 85 pounds, who is recovering from cancer and a broken hip.

On Election Day, when Stacy went to collect her mother to go to the polls, she arrived to find the elevators in the building weren’t functioning. She had to walk up six flights of stairs to her mother’s apartment. When she told her mother that she was sorry she wouldn’t be able to get back down (or back up for that matter) because the elevators were not working, her mother got her coat and started down the six flights of stairs. Half an hour later, one cautious step after another, her daughter following with her walker in one hand and two pocketbooks in the other. Stacy’s mother got down those six flights of stairs. I have no idea how long it took her to get back up again later on.

That frail 82-year-old did not walk down six flights of stairs for us to conduct the business of government the same old way. It is time for a change. And we are that change.

To the earliest settlers of this Commonwealth, as we have been reminded on a couple of occasions today, this Commonwealth was their shining “City on a Hill.” To this kid from the South Side of Chicago, Massachusetts is my shining city on a hill. For every mother living month to month; for every student struggling to get through school; for every dad working two jobs and wondering which one is going to be shipped overseas; for every fisherman wondering whether this year’s catch will do; for every immigrant wondering whether the American Dream is a myth; for every teacher, every bus driver, every government clerk, every firefighter, every small business owner doing your best and wondering whether anyone appreciates you; for every one of God’s children who calls Massachusetts home – let’s rebuild our “city on a hill,” and make it shine again.

God bless our work and God bless you all. Thank you so much."
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Old 01-04-2007, 04:51 PM   #38
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We had a law like that in Alabama.........thank God we voted to abolish it. The Southern Baptist Convention lost that one. Egads.
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Old 01-04-2007, 05:18 PM   #39
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I am now sitting here in utter amazement that my state's liquor sales laws are more liberal than those of Massachusetts. Alabama is a bastion of conservativism, as everyone and their brother knows, and Massachusetts is a bastion of liberalism.......but it was founded by the Puritans. My state, by contrast, was founded by the often hard-drinking Scotch-Irish.
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Old 06-10-2007, 09:21 AM   #40
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By Michael Levenson, Globe Staff

As the Legislature prepares for a crucial debate on same-sex marriage next week, Gov. Deval Patrick today became the first sitting governor to march in Boston's gay pride parade.

Strolling alongside Mayor Thomas Menino, Patrick waved to the crowd amid cheers as the parade made its way through Boston's South End.

"I didn't know the governor was going to be here. It's very respectful. We're supported by the highest official," said Richard Smith, 53, of Shrewsbury.

Patrick has been working to help defeat a proposed constitutional amendement banning same-sex marriage that will come up for vote in a constitutional convention next week.

If the gay marriage ban gets at least 50 votes at the constitutional convention, it will go before voters on the 2008 ballot.

Patrick marched in the last two parades as a candidate for governor. Organizers said Menino has marched in the parade throughout his tenure as mayor.
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Old 06-10-2007, 02:46 PM   #41
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Hey, do you guys want Kwame? Detroit will trade you.
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Old 06-21-2007, 10:47 PM   #42
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I marched with his campaign in the parade last year. I held the banner up front - it was quite a workout actually because it was heavy and windy. It was a lot of fun and he was the only candidate who marched (Gabrielli's people stood on the side - it was hilarious when we passed them).
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Old 06-21-2007, 11:51 PM   #43
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Wait a minute.

In other states you can buy liquor in grocery stores?
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Old 06-22-2007, 12:12 AM   #44
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Quote:
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Wait a minute.

In other states you can buy liquor in grocery stores?
Yeah it varies from state to state...

Illiniois you could 24 hours a day.
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Old 06-22-2007, 01:45 AM   #45
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God damn scare tactics killing that ballot question....
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