"I could care less"....??? - U2 Feedback

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Old 04-30-2005, 06:19 PM   #1
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"I could care less"....???

I don't understand when people use this expression. It doesn't make sense. I think the right way of saying it is "I couldn't care less." Is that right or where does this expression come from?

English is my second language so it just might be that I've got it wrong ...or right.
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Old 04-30-2005, 06:23 PM   #2
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"I couldn't care less" is an idiom to express "ambivalence." Similar to "I don't care."

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Old 04-30-2005, 06:24 PM   #3
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It's my belief this is just another example of incorrect phrasing, as it makes no sense when used to write something off entirely.
definately
beleif/beleifs
w/
ect

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Old 04-30-2005, 06:35 PM   #4
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" I could care less" is bad English. I have seen other people use it on websites but the expression is "I couldn't care less".

Theres a website around here somewhere listing all the mangled sayings. I looked up "I could care less" when I first encountered it here on Interference.

Heres one website:

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/g...marlogs366.htm
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Old 04-30-2005, 06:38 PM   #5
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"Mangled grammar" is part of the slow evolution of language. That's probably why, over the centuries, "Old English" and current English are completely different from each other.

I have to wonder if English 1000 years from now will be vastly different or not.

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Old 04-30-2005, 06:47 PM   #6
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I was guilty of using this expression until an Interferencer with a penchant for correcting my sometimes hideous grammar set me straight

Mrs. Edge is going to LOVE this thread!
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Old 04-30-2005, 06:49 PM   #7
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I'm sure it will be vastly different. I have issues reading USA English. I believe I have mentioned this before but I was raised in the outback and the English spoken is an older version with no television references. (eg "pornography" means violence to me, not sexual activities. "Terrific" means scary, horrible. etc)

I have difficulties reading this site some times.

I believe the language is also changing due to a general dumbing down. An other expression that is frequently mangled is "six pence non the wiser". This phrase is often misquoted as "six pence non the richer" which makes no sense.

And nursery rhymes are changing - Pop Goes The Weazel, Ring A Rosie, etc.

If I was given a passage written in a thousand years time I'm sure I wouldn't understand it.
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Old 04-30-2005, 06:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli
I'm sure it will be vastly different. I have issues reading USA English. I believe I have mentioned this before but I was raised in the outback and the English spoken is an older version with no television references.
Quebec actually has a similar problem. Their French is actually 17th century French or something of the sort. They also speak at a faster pace than Parisian French, so even French people get pissed off at Quebec French.

At least English speakers are nicer to those with different dialects...lol.

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Old 04-30-2005, 06:57 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by melon
At least English speakers are nicer to those with different dialects...lol.
You clearly have never heard me rip into US English.

But I'm sick of that argument, so I won't enter into it here.

One phrase that I often see misused is "let's see if we can do it" - I've noticed a lot of people say "can't". Well, you're trying to do something, not trying to not do it, so I see 'can' as correct.
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Old 04-30-2005, 06:58 PM   #10
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American English bothers me so much, it's probably bordering on the FYM definition of bigotry to some. Which is not good, but I view the use of American English as 'not good'. I had a discussion about it with a teacher a few weeks ago who let loose on some of my class for an essay we did, and some used many American spellings and phrases in their research. In this case I suspect it was partly due to not writing entirely on their own and was from 'borrowing' too heavily from their resources. But we'd spent most of that class discussing Imperialism and the Church and America and....I'm going to shut up now before someone hits me
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Old 04-30-2005, 06:58 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by melon


Quebec actually has a similar problem. Their French is actually 17th century French or something of the sort. They also speak at a faster pace than Parisian French, so even French people get pissed off at Quebec French.

At least English speakers are nicer to those with different dialects...lol.

Melon
Thats interesting. I didn't know that. I had heard that the Polynesians speak a different French to Parisians but I wasn't aware of the Canadian issue.

Dunno that English speakers are nicer to those with different dialects. I was certainly ripped to shreds when I first moved to Perth. I still cop it a bit as I have a predominately Red accent. I am getting better at the dialect though. Well I think so anyway. lol
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Old 04-30-2005, 07:10 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli
Dunno that English speakers are nicer to those with different dialects. I was certainly ripped to shreds when I first moved to Perth. I still cop it a bit as I have a predominately Red accent. I am getting better at the dialect though. Well I think so anyway. lol
Also look at how Australians and New Zealanders like to rip each other apart. I got a lot of grief when I first came here for my Kiwi accent. Though I've honestly never really noticed any regional accents within Australia.
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Ian McCulloch the U2 fan:
"Who buys U2 records anyway? It's just music for plumbers and bricklayers. Bono, what a slob. You'd think with all that climbing about he does, he'd look real fit and that. But he's real fat, y'know. Reminds me of a soddin' mountain goat."
"And as for Bono, he needs a colostomy bag for his mouth."

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Old 04-30-2005, 07:14 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by Angela Harlem
American English bothers me so much, it's probably bordering on the FYM definition of bigotry to some. Which is not good, but I view the use of American English as 'not good'. I had a discussion about it with a teacher a few weeks ago who let loose on some of my class for an essay we did, and some used many American spellings and phrases in their research. In this case I suspect it was partly due to not writing entirely on their own and was from 'borrowing' too heavily from their resources. But we'd spent most of that class discussing Imperialism and the Church and America and....I'm going to shut up now before someone hits me
I'd probably be chased out of FYM if I dared to let loose with my opinion on US English. I'm with you on the 'not good' front. I've had a couple of vicious flamewars elsewhere in the past and I honestly don't feel like one again.

But if you or anyone want to bash it privately, I won't hold back then!
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Ian McCulloch the U2 fan:
"Who buys U2 records anyway? It's just music for plumbers and bricklayers. Bono, what a slob. You'd think with all that climbing about he does, he'd look real fit and that. But he's real fat, y'know. Reminds me of a soddin' mountain goat."
"And as for Bono, he needs a colostomy bag for his mouth."

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Old 04-30-2005, 07:25 PM   #14
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double post as a result of the server not serving.
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Old 04-30-2005, 07:30 PM   #15
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There is a cheese ad on the side of the bus here that is written in Kiwi English which I find a little odd.

There are differences in Australian accents, and in the choice of words.

"Avon" is a good word for hearing the difference, as well as "Albany".

Theres Aaaavon in Sydney, and Avvvvvven in Perth. (Accents exaggerated for demonstration purposes). The Perth accent is faster than Sydneys and Brissies. And the rural WA accent is faster again. (well, from some parts anyway)
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