"I could care less"....??? - Page 9 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind > Free Your Mind Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-01-2005, 03:38 PM   #121
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Popmartijn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 32,543
Local Time: 10:46 AM
__________________

__________________
Popmartijn is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 07:26 PM   #122
ONE
love, blood, life
 
indra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 12,689
Local Time: 05:46 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by bammo2
And I really, REALLY hate the way that the british media have started using Americanisms

for example, talking about shopping malls, or sidewalks.



Ummm.... well, what the hell do you call them?


But after reading this thread I've decided that if I ever meet any of you I'm just going to point and grunt! 'Cause I do a lot of the hated pronunciations, spellings, etc.
__________________

__________________
indra is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:24 PM   #123
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 04:46 AM
Is it pavement?
__________________
anitram is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:57 PM   #124
ONE
love, blood, life
 
indra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 12,689
Local Time: 05:46 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by anitram
Is it pavement?
Isn't pavement a band?
__________________
indra is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:02 PM   #125
Blue Crack Addict
 
beli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: In a frock in Western Australia
Posts: 15,464
Local Time: 05:46 PM
Footpath.

At least thats what we say here. I'm guessing the Poms use the same word.


Pavement is a USA word as well as sidewalk.
__________________
beli is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:07 PM   #126
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 04:46 AM
My friend in Manchester definitely uses pavement for sidewalk.
__________________
anitram is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:18 PM   #127
Blue Crack Addict
 
beli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: In a frock in Western Australia
Posts: 15,464
Local Time: 05:46 PM
There you go. Learn something new everyday. I was just guessing. Maybe the Poms say pavement, the people from the USA say sidewalk, and Aussies say footpath.
__________________
beli is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:22 PM   #128
ONE
love, blood, life
 
indra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 12,689
Local Time: 05:46 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by anitram
My friend in Manchester definitely uses pavement for sidewalk.
In the US you don't want to be walking on the pavement, because that's where the cars are. ....then again, there are a few people in this world I wouldn't mind telling to go out and play on the pavement.
__________________
indra is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:22 PM   #129
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 04:46 AM
For a long time I didn't know that Canadian and American English were considered distinct only based on the spelling, but they are.

It's weird, because we do use a z instead of s (recognize, etc) like Americans (+ aluminum), but we also spell neighbourhood like the British, as well as using the -re suffix instead of -er (like in centre, litre).
__________________
anitram is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:24 PM   #130
Blue Crack Addict
 
beli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: In a frock in Western Australia
Posts: 15,464
Local Time: 05:46 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by indra


In the US you don't want to be walking on the pavement, because that's where the cars are. ....then again, there are a few people in this world I wouldn't mind telling to go out a play on the pavement.
So does pavement mean a road to people in the USA? the bitumen? Thats interesting.

PS Which nationality says "pound the pavement"? I thought it was USA but maybe its England?
__________________
beli is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:26 PM   #131
Blue Crack Addict
 
beli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: In a frock in Western Australia
Posts: 15,464
Local Time: 05:46 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by anitram
For a long time I didn't know that Canadian and American English were considered distinct only based on the spelling, but they are.

It's weird, because we do use a z instead of s (recognize, etc) like Americans (+ aluminum), but we also spell neighbourhood like the British, as well as using the -re suffix instead of -er (like in centre, litre).
Canada has metric too, yes? I wonder how Canada ended up with part USA English, part English English....
__________________
beli is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:35 PM   #132
ONE
love, blood, life
 
indra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 12,689
Local Time: 05:46 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by beli


So does pavement mean a road to people in the USA? the bitumen? Thats interesting.

PS Which nationality says "pound the pavement"? I thought it was USA but maybe its England?
Yeah, pavement usually means road. I don't think anyone uses bitumen here (we couldn't pronounce it anyway ).

And yeah, we do use the term "pound the pavement" but that would more or less mean sidewalks (or footpaths ), so maybe that's our Brit heritage showing.
__________________
indra is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:37 PM   #133
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 04:46 AM
Yes, Canada has metric and Celsius (we converted some decades ago). Our pronunciation is also decidedly "American" with some minimal exceptions. Most of our spelling is British. I have no idea how it all happened.
__________________
anitram is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:37 PM   #134
ONE
love, blood, life
 
indra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 12,689
Local Time: 05:46 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by beli


I wonder how Canada ended up with part USA English, part English English....
We're creeping up on those Canucks! Infiltrating their language....going for the hearts and minds next!
__________________
indra is offline  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:44 PM   #135
Blue Crack Addict
 
beli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: In a frock in Western Australia
Posts: 15,464
Local Time: 05:46 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by indra


Yeah, pavement usually means road. I don't think anyone uses bitumen here (we couldn't pronounce it anyway ).

And yeah, we do use the term "pound the pavement" but that would more or less mean sidewalks (or footpaths ), so maybe that's our Brit heritage showing.
So a pavement means a road unless you are pounding the pavement and then its a sidewalk? lol.

Are your roads bitumen or paved?
__________________

__________________
beli is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com