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Old 04-30-2005, 08:43 PM   #46
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I was thinking more like New England.
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Old 04-30-2005, 08:45 PM   #47
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Originally posted by beli


You reckon? I dont think so. I guess Im hearing an R heavy USA accent when I hear 'Martiner'. Bit like the way people from California say rule-errrrrrrrrrrrrrrr, instead of roo-laaaaaaaaaaaaa.
When I was actually focusing on pronouncing the 'r', then yeah, that's exactly what happened. But when I said 'Martiner' with the very soft 'r' from 'car', it was pretty close to Martinuh.
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Ian McCulloch the U2 fan:
"Who buys U2 records anyway? It's just music for plumbers and bricklayers. Bono, what a slob. You'd think with all that climbing about he does, he'd look real fit and that. But he's real fat, y'know. Reminds me of a soddin' mountain goat."
"And as for Bono, he needs a colostomy bag for his mouth."

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Old 04-30-2005, 08:45 PM   #48
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I dont think I have heard a New England accent. Most of the USA people over here are from California.

At work, I did once deal with a debt collector in Boston on the phone. He had a different accent.
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Old 04-30-2005, 08:46 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axver


When I was actually focusing on pronouncing the 'r', then yeah, that's exactly what happened. But when I said 'Martiner' with the 'r' from 'car', it was pretty close to Martinuh.
Thats because there is no "r" in car. lol.
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Old 04-30-2005, 08:48 PM   #50
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Originally posted by Angela Harlem


You're the exception, you dusty red hick! You just sound private school whipped, I mean educated.
And you sound like a summers day on the beach.
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Old 04-30-2005, 08:49 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli


Thats because there is no "r" in car. lol.
Hah, yeah. I just tried emphasising the 'r' and it sounded horrifically wrong.

I think with some Kiwi pronunciation, 'uh' and a soft 'r' can get very blurred. I've typed out the Kiwi pronunciation of 'chance' as 'chahnce', 'charnce', and 'chahrnce'. None seem wrong to my ears.
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Ian McCulloch the U2 fan:
"Who buys U2 records anyway? It's just music for plumbers and bricklayers. Bono, what a slob. You'd think with all that climbing about he does, he'd look real fit and that. But he's real fat, y'know. Reminds me of a soddin' mountain goat."
"And as for Bono, he needs a colostomy bag for his mouth."

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Old 04-30-2005, 09:09 PM   #52
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Being from the sticks of Ohio, and an atrocious speller to boot, I probably will be shredded in this here thread.

But I think any plans for going to Australia or New Zealand have just been shot to hell. Yikes! It would freak me out knowing people were picking apart the way I speak. Of course, I always thought y'all had a bastardised form of english anyway, just as we do (except different).
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Old 04-30-2005, 09:16 PM   #53
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Originally posted by indra
Of course, I always thought y'all had a bastardised form of english anyway, just as we do (except different).
Our pronunciation's debatable, I guess (especially Australians, who we Kiwis reckon say 'sex' instead of 'six'), but we do spell properly. And yes, I really do consider Commonwealth English spelling to be proper spelling and US English to be incorrect. *ducks flying objects*
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Ian McCulloch the U2 fan:
"Who buys U2 records anyway? It's just music for plumbers and bricklayers. Bono, what a slob. You'd think with all that climbing about he does, he'd look real fit and that. But he's real fat, y'know. Reminds me of a soddin' mountain goat."
"And as for Bono, he needs a colostomy bag for his mouth."

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Old 04-30-2005, 09:41 PM   #54
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Sorry to return this to the original post, but someone has to!!

With regard to the expression, "I could care less" vs. "I couldn't care less": They are both valid.
"I couldn't care less" is logical, and it's what most English speaking people should say, if they want to sound as if they are making sense.
For "I could care less" to make sense, you would have to imagine what it might sound like if someone actually said it. It's Yiddish in inflection, being very sarcastic in its up-tone: "I could care less??" The first three words are all on the same note, and the last word is a full note higher. It really means: I honestly could not care less, with a big cynical shrug.
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Old 04-30-2005, 09:57 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally posted by indra
Being from the sticks of Ohio, and an atrocious speller to boot, I probably will be shredded in this here thread.

But I think any plans for going to Australia or New Zealand have just been shot to hell. Yikes! It would freak me out knowing people were picking apart the way I speak. Of course, I always thought y'all had a bastardised form of english anyway, just as we do (except different).
Nah, your accent wouldnt be shot to pieces. Your spelling might though.
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Old 04-30-2005, 09:59 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally posted by biff
For "I could care less" to make sense, you would have to imagine what it might sound like if someone actually said it. It's Yiddish in inflection, being very sarcastic in its up-tone: "I could care less??" The first three words are all on the same note, and the last word is a full note higher. It really means: I honestly could not care less, with a big cynical shrug.
That would go right over my head.

Its a bit like how USA people say "I lucked out" and its means something good to some people in the USA. In Australia it means that the person has run out of luck ie something bad has happened.
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Old 04-30-2005, 10:07 PM   #57
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Well, I agree that the expression "I lucked out" means something completely different in our countries, as opposed to the U.S.
But that's an idiomatic expression.
What I'm talking about is inflection and physical gesture, in addition to the actual words. The literal words mean less than the way in which they are expressed.
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Old 04-30-2005, 10:08 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli


That would go right over my head.

Its a bit like how USA people say "I lucked out" and its means something good to some people in the USA. In Australia it means that the person has run out of luck ie something bad has happened.
That phrase is meant to mean something good in the US?

Oh, NOW I find out. I really want to know what's wrong with saying 'I was lucky' - or here, saying 'I wasn't lucky'.

Also, I've been told by a few people that in the US, if you refer to someone as your 'partner', it means they're of the same sex as you - in other words, that you're gay. Any Americans want to confirm or deny this? I'd use 'partner' to refer to someone I'm romantically involved with but not married to. I hate the word 'girlfriend' because it sounds so 13-years-old, but I use it online now after a couple of Americans told me 'partner' makes me sound like I have a boyfriend.
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"Mediocrity is never so dangerous as when it is dressed up as sincerity." - Søren Kierkegaard

Ian McCulloch the U2 fan:
"Who buys U2 records anyway? It's just music for plumbers and bricklayers. Bono, what a slob. You'd think with all that climbing about he does, he'd look real fit and that. But he's real fat, y'know. Reminds me of a soddin' mountain goat."
"And as for Bono, he needs a colostomy bag for his mouth."

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Old 04-30-2005, 10:11 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally posted by biff
Well, I agree that the expression "I lucked out" means something completely different in our countries, as opposed to the U.S.
But that's an idiomatic expression.
What I'm talking about is inflection and physical gesture, in addition to the actual words. The literal words mean less than the way in which they are expressed.
Which is all lost on the internet. Australians have a few expressions that really require visuals to fully appreciate.
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Old 04-30-2005, 10:13 PM   #60
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Originally posted by Axver
Also, I've been told by a few people that in the US, if you refer to someone as your 'partner', it means they're of the same sex as you - in other words, that you're gay. Any Americans want to confirm or deny this? I'd use 'partner' to refer to someone I'm romantically involved with but not married to. I hate the word 'girlfriend' because it sounds so 13-years-old, but I use it online now after a couple of Americans told me 'partner' makes me sound like I have a boyfriend.
In Australian, "partner" used to me a person in a same sex relationship, once upon a time. The definition has loosened over time. Except with some old folks. I wouldn't recommend telling your grandfather you have a partner. loll.
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